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The One Big Problem That Advocates of Copenhagen-Style Urbanism Often Overlook

09:30 - 12 July, 2017
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/diversey/15325678721/'>Flickr user diversey</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Flickr user diversey licensed under CC BY 2.0

This article was originally published on Common Edge as "What We Can (and Can’t) Learn from Copenhagen."

I spent four glorious days in Copenhagen recently and left with an acute case of urban envy. (I kept thinking: It’s like... an American Portland—except better.) Why can’t we do cities like this in the US? That’s the question an urban nerd like me asks while strolling the famously pedestrian-friendly streets, as hordes of impossibly blond and fit Danes bicycle briskly past.

Copenhagen is one of the most civilized cities on the planet. The world’s “most livable,” it’s often called, with some justification. (Although a Danish relative did caution me, “Spend a few weeks here in January before you make that pronouncement.”) But the seemingly effortless civility, Copenhagen’s amazing level of grace, is not an accident of place or happenstance. It’s the product of a shared belief that transcends urban design, even though the city is a veritable laboratory for pretty much all of the best practices in the field.

Decades After the Rise of CAD, Architecture Is Going “Paperless”—For Real This Time

09:30 - 11 July, 2017
Decades After the Rise of CAD, Architecture Is Going “Paperless”—For Real This Time, A view of Sean Gallagher's work as seen in Morpholio's Trace App. Image Courtesy of Morpholio
A view of Sean Gallagher's work as seen in Morpholio's Trace App. Image Courtesy of Morpholio

If you visit an architecture office today, you may sense a slight change. The days of bulky desktops, ergonomic mouse pads and tower-high stacks of drawing sets are slowly giving way to digital pencils, tablets, and tons of architects’ hand-drawings—both physical and digital. Architects across the globe are clearing their desks, literally, and utilizing emerging touchscreen tools and software for designing, sharing and collaborating. It seems possible that, for the first time in years, the architecture profession could revisit Bernard Tschumi’s “paperless” studio which formed a key part of his tenure as dean of Columbia University’s GSAPP in the mid-1990s. However, this time, “paperless” starts with a pencil, instead of a click.

Kersten Geers of OFFICE KGDVS on the Role of Book-Making in Architectural Practice

10:30 - 10 July, 2017
Kersten Geers of OFFICE KGDVS on the Role of Book-Making in Architectural Practice, Courtesy of OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen
Courtesy of OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen

In this episode of GSAPP ConversationsKersten Geers—co-founder of OFFICE KGDVS—and Amale Andraos discuss their shared obsession with books, and the integral role that book-making plays in their professional offices and teaching. In this podcast, Geers echoes Aldo Rossi’s call to evaluate architecture within a cultural context, positioning books as the best tool to create a place in which architectural work acquires value and meaning; a device to establish a context of ideas.

7 Mistakes That Will Destroy A Successful Architecture Resume/CV

09:30 - 10 July, 2017
7 Mistakes That Will Destroy A Successful Architecture Resume/CV, Alex Rodríguez Santibáñez <a href='https://unsplash.com/@alexrds?utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=photographer-credit&utm_content=creditBadge'>Via Unsplash</a>
Alex Rodríguez Santibáñez Via Unsplash

This article was originally published on Brandon Hubbard's blog, The Architect's Guide.

According to a new study released by TheLadders, recruiters spend only six seconds on average looking at your resume. This proves the importance of having a concise, well-formatted resume that emphasizes your greatest skills and experience.

I have the "benefit" of reading hundreds, if not thousands, of architecture resumes throughout the year. This gives me a unique opportunity to see a range of good and bad examples. Often the weaker samples come from younger candidates who haven't been in the job market for very long. If you are just starting out in your career the task of creating a resume can be daunting.

118 Impressive Architecture Tattoo Designs

08:00 - 10 July, 2017
118 Impressive Architecture Tattoo Designs, stacy.hounsome. <a href='https://www.instagram.com/p/BPAmzuABpY2/'>Via Instagram</a>
stacy.hounsome. Via Instagram

Creative, expressive, visual, a little bit edgy – tattoos convey many of the same qualities we as architects strive to achieve both in designing buildings and crafting our own personal identities. Whether it’s a small geometric motif or a full-back masterpiece, a tattoo is an immediate statement of who you are and what interests you.

Luckily for architects, the subjects of our affections just so happen to also make great source material for tattoos, from your favorite Miesian plan to a simple city skyline to the elaborate facade of a gothic cathedral.

Here, we’ve rounded up 118 of the most impressive architectural tattoos from across the internet and from submissions by our own ArchDaily readers. Each tattoo has its own story to tell (one reader even shared that his tattoos were inspired by scars obtained through model making mishaps).

Feeling inspired for some ink? Check out the list below!

Architecture and the Human Scale: The Best Photos of The Week

09:30 - 9 July, 2017

The incorporation of the human figure is one of the most effective tools employed in architectural photography: it helps the viewer decipher the scale of work. While it successfully communicates a rough idea of the measurements of the elements photographed, it also makes architecture more relatable and accessible. People engage better with the built environment when it is populated; the human sense of society and community is the cornerstone of our civilization. With this in mind, we showcase a selection of our favorite photographs where the human figure takes center stage to enhance our reading of architecture.

© Doublespace © Hufton + Crow © Jordi Castellano © Adrien Williams + 11

This Video Presents an Abstract Reflection on Our Modern Cities of Glass

09:30 - 8 July, 2017

In this visual essay, Greek filmmaker Yiannis Biliris documents the all-pervasive pall of glass that covers the modern city. The three-and-a-half-minute-long film, produced by Visual Suspect and shot entirely in Hong Kong, captures the vivid reflections seen in the facades of the city’s buildings, as Biliris selectively pans and zooms his camera to instill a strong sense of urgency in the viewer’s mind.

The essay, beautifully haunting in its imagery, might be seen as a reflective commentary on the state of our built environment today. Inspired by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which states that mass causes a distortion in space and time, it seems to subtly ask if our understanding of reality is warped itself. Describing the video as "a visual essay about perception and knowledge as [a] reflection of our reality," Biliris comments that "mass curves space and time, while the observer has his own perspective."

Christian de Portzamparc: “No One But an Architect Can Solve the Problems of the Contemporary City”

09:30 - 7 July, 2017
Christian de Portzamparc: “No One But an Architect Can Solve the Problems of the Contemporary City”, Luxembourg Philharmonie, Luxembourg, 2005. Image © Wade Zimmerman
Luxembourg Philharmonie, Luxembourg, 2005. Image © Wade Zimmerman

Of the Pritzker Prize’s illustrious list of laureates, the 1994 winner Christian de Portzamparc is perhaps the least covered by the media. However, this relatively low profile belies the subtle and insightful understanding of architectural and urban issues that in many ways puts him decades ahead of the curve – with the sociologically-led principles he has been developing since the early 1980s now becoming widely popular in architectural circles. In this interview, the latest in Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” column, Portzamparc explains the journey that led to this unique take on architecture.

Paris Opera Ballet School, Nanterre, 1987. Image © Nicolas Borel Credit Lyonnais Tower, Lille, 1995. Image © Wade Zimmerman Cidade das Artes, Rio de Janeiro, 2013. Image © Hufton + Crow Suzhou Cultural Center Proposal, Suzhou, 2017. Image © Christian de Portzamparc + 69

Shortlist Revealed for World Architecture Festival Awards 2017

05:05 - 7 July, 2017
Shortlist Revealed for World Architecture Festival Awards 2017

The World Architecture Festival has announced the shortlist for their 2017 awards slate, featuring 434 projects ranging from  small family homes, to schools, stations, museums, large infrastructure and landscape projects. The world’s largest architectural award program, the WAF Awards year saw more participation this year than ever before, with a total of 924 entries received from projects located in 68 countries across the world.

How OMA's First Project in Shanghai Acts As a Connecting Element for the City

09:30 - 6 July, 2017

#donotsettle is an online video project created by Wahyu Pratomo and Kris Provoost about architecture and the way it is perceived by its users. Having published a number of videos on ArchDaily over the past two years, Pratomo and Provoost are now launching an exclusive column, “#donotsettle extra,” which will accompany some of their #donotsettle videos with in-depth textual analysis of the buildings they visit.

After a stop in Doha to visit IM Pei’s Museum of Islamic Art, and a peek inside MVRDV’s house office in Rotterdam, we are bringing you to Shanghai for our 3rd #donotsettle Extra column. Last week we visited OMA’s first project in Shanghai, the Lujiazui Exhibition Centre, and had the privilege to get a sneak preview before it opens to the public in the next months. Please tag along!

© Wahyu Pratomo and Kris Provoost © Wahyu Pratomo and Kris Provoost © Wahyu Pratomo and Kris Provoost © Wahyu Pratomo and Kris Provoost + 17

7 Alternative, Interdisciplinary Graduate Courses for Architects

09:30 - 5 July, 2017
The Harvard Graduate School of Design offers a "Master in Design Engineering (MDE)" in conjunction with the university's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/peterhess/5827571398'>Flickr user peterhess</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
The Harvard Graduate School of Design offers a "Master in Design Engineering (MDE)" in conjunction with the university's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Image © Flickr user peterhess licensed under CC BY 2.0

As final juries draw to a close, graduating architecture students are left with a crucial decision to make. While some might take a plunge into the scary real world looking to gain professional experience, others might choose to further reinforce their architecture education and skill set. Of the latter, most enroll in an MArch program, or take well-trodden paths into urban design and planning, landscape architecture, historic preservation, or theory and criticism. But in an increasingly complex world faced with myriad problems, what about those graduate architects looking to bolster their education in other related disciplines that will give them a more unique perspective on design problems? Here, we shortlist seven alternative, interdisciplinary graduate programs offered by architecture schools worldwide.

Critics Laud Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Pavilion for Its Simplicity and Authenticity

09:30 - 4 July, 2017
Critics Laud Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Pavilion for Its Simplicity and Authenticity, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

London’s annual temporary architecture pavilion spectacular has returned. Each summer the Serpentine Pavilion program selects an accomplished architect who has yet to create work in the United Kingdom, and asks them to build a temporary shelter on the gallery's lawn. The resulting structure is erected in June and dismantled in October.

This year’s offering is designed by Francis Kéré—the first pavilion designed by an African Architect to grace Kensington Gardens. Kéré’s project is composed of a series of curving blue walls shaded by an elliptical cantilevering wood and steel canopy. Thus far the design has been universally lauded by critics; read on to find out why they thought the project was so appealing.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Iwan Baan © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 6

The World's Most Expensive Cities in 2017 (And Why They Are So Expensive)

09:30 - 3 July, 2017
The World's Most Expensive Cities in 2017 (And Why They Are So Expensive)

As anyone who has recently attempted apartment-hunting in a major urban area will know, reasonably-priced housing can be difficult to come by for many and salaries don’t always seem to match the cost of living. This gap is contributing to housing crises in developed and developing countries worldwide. People are simply being priced out of cities, where housing has become a commodity instead of a basic human right. Financial speculation and states’ support of financial markets in a way that makes housing unaffordable has created an unsustainable global housing crisis. 

Earlier this year the 13th Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey was released for 2017, revealing that the number of “severely unaffordable” major housing markets rose from 26 to 29 this year; the problem is getting worse. The study evaluates 406 metropolitan housing markets in nine of the world's major economies and uses the “median multiple” approach to determine affordability. By dividing the median house price by the median household income of an area, this method is meant to be a summary of “middle-income housing affordability.”

The Democratic Monument: Adam Nathaniel Furman's Manifesto for a New Type of Civic Center

04:00 - 3 July, 2017
The Democratic Monument: Adam Nathaniel Furman's Manifesto for a New Type of Civic Center, © Adam Nathaniel Furman
© Adam Nathaniel Furman

Civic buildings are, as a rule, both austere and intimidating. They are often designed to represent authority above all, taking cues from Classical architectural language to construct an image of power, dominance, and civic unity. Adam Nathaniel Furman, a London-based architect and thinker, has at once eschewed and reengaged this typology in order to propose an entirely new type of civic center ("Town Hall") for British cities. The proposal, which was commissioned by the 2017 Scottish Architectural Fringe as part of a New Typologies exhibition in which architects are imagining "how our shared civic infrastructure will exist in the future, if at all", is currently on display in Glasgow.

By "re-grouping various civic functions into one visually symbolic composition of architectural forms," references and types of ornament and allusions have been configured "depending on the metropolitan area within which it is situated in and embodies." In short, Furman states, the Democratic Monument "is an expression of urban pride, chromatic joy, and architectural complexity" which has universal symbolism but remains a beacon to its vicinity.

© Adam Nathaniel Furman © Adam Nathaniel Furman © Adam Nathaniel Furman © Adam Nathaniel Furman + 20

Is this the “Best Drone for Architects”?

09:30 - 2 July, 2017

Architect and author of the Architect + Entrepreneur book series Eric Reinholdt recently released a video detailing the results of his research into the best drone for architects and designers. The drone he chose is the Mavic Pro from DJI, which he says balances multiple factors like cost, portability, camera quality, stability, ease of operation, and flight time. The only major negative Reinholdt mentions is the camera’s fixed aperture; he recommends counteracting this by purchasing neutral density filters, which help adjust the camera’s exposure. But why architects? Reinholdt mentions the variety of possible uses for a drone throughout a project, but most importantly, he sees video as the future of telling the story of architecture. Through video, you can simulate a user's movement through spaces and mimic the experience of architecture.

See Thyssenkrupp's Sideways-Moving Elevator in Action

09:30 - 1 July, 2017

In this video, British YouTuber Tom Scott explores Thyssenkrupp’s potentially disruptive new "MULTI" elevator system,” which the company revealed in detail this week. Though only in its beta stage of development, being tested within the confines of ThyssenKrupp’s 246-meter tall “innovation” tower in Rottweil, Germany, Multi aims to transform high rise building design with horizontally moving elevator cabs.

The German firm’s cable-free system utilizes vertically mounted tracks, in-cab braking systems, and pivoting elevator tracks to whisk occupants up and across buildings faster and safer than traditional shaft based systems.

Envisioning a Hip-Hop Urbanism in Washington DC

09:30 - 30 June, 2017
Collage from Ivy City, a preliminary stage of the Ivy City Redux project. Image © Kyle Simmons
Collage from Ivy City, a preliminary stage of the Ivy City Redux project. Image © Kyle Simmons

The following is a manifesto, in search of a movement... In it, I am proposing a theory of architecture based around a ruffneck, antisocial, hip-hop, rudeboy ethos. [1]
– Kara Walker

In her companion publication to the 2014 group exhibition “Ruffneck Constructivists,” the show’s curator, Kara Walker, lays down a radical manifesto for urban intervention. Just months before Ferguson [2] and a year before Baltimore, [3] Walker proposes her theory through which installation artists (along with architects and designers by extension) can become “defiant shapers of environments.” [4] The invocation and juxtaposition of the terms hip-hop and architecture in the intro to her manifesto is particularly remarkable given the show’s exclusive assembly of visual and installation artists.

See Jože Plečnik's Unrealized "Cathedral of Freedom" Animated For The Very First Time

07:00 - 30 June, 2017

Jože Plečnik is often described as Slovenia's greatest architect despite his passing over seven decades ago. The trace of his hand, which was trained in Vienna under Otto Wagner, can be seen across the country – and especially so in Ljubljana. Although Plečnik is often most keenly remembered for his restorative work and renovation of Prague Castle in the 1920s, the impact he left on the Slovenian capital is unmistakable.

Today, the city is dominated by a medieval castle, sat definatly atop a hill. It was for here, on this particularly charged site, that Plečnik proposed a radical intervention in the mid-20th Century. He wanted to build a new Slovene Parliament – a structure of State to house the legislature of the People's Republic of Slovenia within the second Yugoslavia. With this plan rejected by the authorities, Plečnik proposed a second design—known colloquially as the "Cathedral of Freedom"—here rebuilt and animated for the first time by Kristijan Tavcar.

Jože Plečnik's unrealised second proposal for the Slovenian Parliament. Image © Kristijan Tavcar Jože Plečnik's unrealised second proposal for the Slovenian Parliament. Image © Kristijan Tavcar Jože Plečnik's unrealised second proposal for the Slovenian Parliament. Image © Kristijan Tavcar Jože Plečnik's unrealised second proposal for the Slovenian Parliament. Image © Kristijan Tavcar + 12