Create a Mini Metropolis with Sticky Page Markers

14:00 - 11 July, 2015
Create a Mini Metropolis with Sticky Page Markers, via Duncan Shotton Design Studio
via Duncan Shotton Design Studio

Building a city has never been so easy. With Duncan Shotton Design Studio's Sticky Page Markers you can create your own urban landscape, while marking the pages of your books, catalogues, or notes.

Amanda Levete's MPavilion Inspired by Forest Canopy

16:23 - 10 July, 2015
Amanda Levete's MPavilion Inspired by Forest Canopy, © AL_A
© AL_A

Images have been released of Melbourne's second annual MPavilion. Designed by British architect Amanda Levete of AL_A, the temporary structure will use the latest technology in nautical engineering to stimulate a forest-like canopy within the city’s Queen Victoria Gardens. A series of three- and five-meter wide petals made from ultra-thin translucent composite and carbon fiber will "sway" on top slender columns, mimicking the tree line to the site's east.

Kengo Kuma, SANAA and Nikken Design New Shibuya Skyscraper

12:24 - 10 July, 2015
Kengo Kuma, SANAA and Nikken Design New Shibuya Skyscraper, © Tokyu Corporation
© Tokyu Corporation

Tokyu Corporation has unveiled a new skyscraper planned will rise adjacent to Tokyo's Shibuya Station. A collaborative design by Japanese firms Kengo KumaSANAA and Nikken, the 230-meter mixed use tower will feature an unprecedented, 3,000-square-meter public sky deck that promises "views of Mt. Fuji" (on a clear day).  

The Shibuya tower is planned to open in 2019, a year before the Tokyo Olympics.

4 Ways Technology Can Improve Architecture for (and by) the Blind

09:30 - 10 July, 2015
4 Ways Technology Can Improve Architecture for (and by) the Blind, inTACT Sketchpad for the visually impaired. Image via Dwell Magazine, Courtesy of Don Fogg
inTACT Sketchpad for the visually impaired. Image via Dwell Magazine, Courtesy of Don Fogg

Seven years after waking up without sight, San Francisco-based architect Chris Downey is helping to revolutionize the built environment with interactive technologies optimized for the blind. One of the world's leading blind architects, Downey intrinsically understands the issues facing blind and visually impaired people worldwide. As a consultant to a variety of organizations serving to advance universal access, Downey has played an integral role in the development and integration of new, non-invasive technologies designed to assist the blind. 

In a recent article in Dwell, Downey illustrates the various technologies currently being tested and implemented in San Francisco - a city notorious for its topographical challenges to differently abled residents. See four takeaways from Dwell's interview with Downey on how technology can help bridge the gap between architecture and universal access after the break.

Help Save Odile Decq’s BPO Building From Being Demolished

08:00 - 10 July, 2015
Help Save Odile Decq’s BPO Building From Being Demolished , The BPO Building, currently up for demolition. Image Courtesy of Studio Odile Decq
The BPO Building, currently up for demolition. Image Courtesy of Studio Odile Decq

Designed by Odile Decq and Benoit Cornette, the BPO Building in Montgermont, France is now being threatened by a demolition permit. Inaugurated in 1990 and having won no less than 12 awards in its lifetime - including a Golden Lion at the 1996 Venice Biennale - the building has been widely lauded for its technical innovations, including a double-glazed suspended façade and panoramic elevators. It has appeared as the focus of theses internationally, and is featured at the Cité de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine and Palais de Chaillot, illustrating its pivotal role in architectural growth. It was one of the first buildings in the 90s to demonstrate an acute response to the quality of workplaces, and stands as an example of conscious, thoughtful design.

Monocle 24 Examines the Impact of the 'Illegal City'

04:00 - 10 July, 2015
Monocle 24 Examines the Impact of the 'Illegal City', Metropolitan Graffiti Art. Image Courtesy of Monocle
Metropolitan Graffiti Art. Image Courtesy of Monocle

In the latest edition of The Urbanist, Monocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities," the team tackle the illegal city and look at how our cities are dealing with those who are bending the rules. From Portugal to Albania to Brazil, Andrew Tuck and his correspondents explore how crime and illegality have become ubiquitous in our urban environment, from informal settlements and illegal housing, street art and rough sleeping, to the more sinister impact of inner-city organised crime.

Rogers Partners, Ken Smith and ASD's St. Petersburg's "Pier Park" Wins City Approval

14:52 - 9 July, 2015
Rogers Partners, Ken Smith and ASD's St. Petersburg's "Pier Park" Wins City Approval, © The Pier Park / Rogers Partners Architects+Urban Designers, ASD, Ken Smith
© The Pier Park / Rogers Partners Architects+Urban Designers, ASD, Ken Smith

The St. Petersburg City Council has approved Rogers Partners, Ken Smith and ASD's "Pier Park" redesign, allocating funds towards demolition of the current pier and pre-construction work. The design, selected through a city-sponsored competition, will replace "an aging icon" - a 1970s inverted pyramid structure that occupies the pier's head - and focus on integrating flexible, community-oriented program throughout the site and surrounding area. 

“Each of the pier’s past incarnations had its own set of programs and uses, some more ambitious than others,” commented John Curran, studio leader at ASD and lead project manager for the new pier. “The ones that succeeded appealed to both visitors and residents, and were active day and night, throughout the year. This flexibility was essential to our approach to the new design.”

Ennead Teams Up with Chilean Architects to Design Cape Horn Sub-Antarctic Center

12:51 - 9 July, 2015
Ennead Teams Up with Chilean Architects to Design Cape Horn Sub-Antarctic Center, Courtesy of Ennead Architects
Courtesy of Ennead Architects

As a result of a public competition, the Chilean Regional Government has commissioned Ennead Architects to collaborate with Chilean architects Cristian Sanhueza and Cristian Ostertag on the design of the Cape Horn Sub-Antarctic Center. Planned for a site within the UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Puerto Williams, a town on Navarino Island in the Chilean Sub-Antarctic Province, the center will provide a home for the Biocultural Research and Conservation Program led by Dr. Ricardo Rozzi, Professor at the University of North Texas, the Universidad de Magallanes and the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity.

Spotlight: Michael Graves

10:00 - 9 July, 2015
Spotlight: Michael Graves, Portland Building (1982). Image © Steve Morgan via Wikimedia Commons
Portland Building (1982). Image © Steve Morgan via Wikimedia Commons

As a firm believer in the importance of making good design accessible to the public, Michael Graves (July 9, 1934 – March 12, 2015) produced an enormous body of work that included product design alongside his architecture. Graves brought Postmodernism to the public eye through his emphasis on ornament and aesthetics, and stood firmly behind his design philosophy even as it went out of vogue.

"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships

09:30 - 9 July, 2015
"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships, Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA
Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA

The world of architecture is small. So small in fact, that Rem Koolhaas has been credited with the creation of over forty practices worldwide, led by the likes of Zaha Hadid and Bjarke Ingels. Dubbed “Baby Rems” by Metropolis Magazine, this Koolhaas effect is hardly an isolated pattern, with manifestations far beyond the walls of OMA. The phenomenon has dominated the world of architecture, assisted by the prevalence and increasing necessity of internships for burgeoning architects.

In a recent article for Curbed, Patrick Sisson dug into the storied history of internships to uncover some unexpected connections between the world's most prolific architects. With the help of Sisson's list, we've compiled a record of the humble beginnings of the household names of architecture. Where did Frank Gehry get his start? Find out after the break.

Renzo Piano's pavilion at Louis Kahn's Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Robert Laprelle Jeanne Gang worked on OMA's Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Mies van der Rohe worked on Behren's AEG Turbine Factory. Image © Flickr CC user Joseph The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York by Louis Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Jack E. Boucher +8

Article 25 Launch Appeal After Uncovering "Multiple Unapproved Payments" in Excess of £200,000

09:11 - 9 July, 2015
Article 25 Launch Appeal After Uncovering "Multiple Unapproved Payments" in Excess of £200,000

Article 25, the charity which designs, builds, and manages projects to provide buildings for some of the world’s most vulnerable communities, have announced that late last month "the Managing Director [...] was made aware by its bank of irregular account activity." They have stated that a full investigation was immediately launched and the trustees have since "uncovered what appears to be a systematic falsification of financial statements that have hidden multiple unapproved payments, which are believed to be in excess of £200,000" (€280,000 or $310,000 USD). They have announced that William Golding, the office manager and book keeper, "was absent on Monday June 29 and has been uncontactable since then."

Find out how you can help after the break.

How Popular Could "Anti-Builder" and "Anti-Architect" Homes Become?

04:00 - 9 July, 2015

The UK is in the midst of a housing crisis, the intricacies of which were detailed by Rowan Moore earlier this year. For decades the typical British housing stock has been of relatively poor quality, proliferated by developer-led consortiums and characterised by ruthless cost-efficiency for maximum profit. From this formula comes nothing but a monotony of off-the-shelf constructions which have, over time, become a national benchmark. These houses – often built of brick, boxy in form, and using as little space in the facade for openings – are commonly dark, spatially inadequate, and far below the standards that should be being aimed for. It’s like living in a well-appointed cave.

BIG, Jean Nouvel, and 5 Others Reinterpret Arne Jacobsen's Series 7 Chair

15:52 - 8 July, 2015
BIG, Jean Nouvel, and 5 Others Reinterpret Arne Jacobsen's Series 7 Chair, Bjarke Ingels Group. Image via www.fritzhansen.com
Bjarke Ingels Group. Image via www.fritzhansen.com

Sixty years ago Arne Jacobsen designed the Series 7 chair - the "Sevener." Unlike many other Jacobsen designs, the chair was not designed for a specific use, leaving it to interpretation. In light of the chair's 60th anniversary, Fritz Hansen commissioned "seven cool architects" - BIG, Zaha Hadid, Jean Nouvel, Snøhetta and three others - to recreate the chair. The results, after the break. 

Zaha Hadid Design. Image via www.fritzhansen.com Jun Igarashi Architects. Image via www.fritzhansen.com Neri&Hu Design & Research Office. Image via www.fritzhansen.com Jean Nouvel Design. Image via www.fritzhansen.com +15

Populous Designs Tottenham Hotspur's New Stadium in London

14:43 - 8 July, 2015
Populous Designs Tottenham Hotspur's New Stadium in London, © Populous
© Populous

British football club Tottenham Hotspur has released plans for a new stadium designed by Populous. Planned to be built in the London borough of Haringey, the "visually dramatic" 61,000-seat proposal is designed to host both English and American football. If approved, it will feature a state-of-the-art retractable pitch and a 17,000 capacity single tier end stand that will be the UK's largest.

Beyond the field, the new stadium will feature a permanent visitors center and arrivals hub with an interactive museum to celebrate club history and local heritage, a cinema, the club megastore, ticket office and café. At the top of the stadium will be a "Sky Walk" showcasing vistas of London. 

Zaha Hadid Named "New Londoner of the Year"

12:40 - 8 July, 2015
Zaha Hadid Named "New Londoner of the Year", London's dense center. Image Courtesy of NLA
London's dense center. Image Courtesy of NLA

New London Architecture (NLA) has named the winners of this years New London Awards, celebrating the best projects and architects shaping London today. Taking home top honors, Zaha Hadid was crowned "New Londoner of the Year" for her influential work, both in the UK and abroad. The jury commended Hadid for "her role as a champion of design to both the government and the general public alike," citing her success with the London Aquatic Center and the Serpentine Sackler Gallery

Out of the 51 projects awarded, Pringle Richards Sharratt's Black Cultural Archives (BCA) in Brixton was named London's best new building. The Grade II listed structure, which had been on the English Heritage's Heritage at Risk Register since 1992, was restored as a new home for BCA’s extensive archives, serving as an exemplar for preservation and reuse

Building Elements Come Alive with this Pinecone-Inspired Material that Reacts to Moisture

11:30 - 8 July, 2015

Reactive materials hold huge potential for architects and engineers in the near future, offering forms of interactive and customizable construction that could, if used properly, seriously alter the way in which people interact with their built environment. The massive expansion in the capabilities of touch screens and other glass based technologies have opened up user interfaces to levels where interactive cityscapes are becoming reachable - but creating materials which are themselves reactive is a much less-explored solution. Water Reaction, a project by Royal College of Art student Chao Chen, is an attempt at exactly that: creating a material that reacts to external conditions with no human input required.

An artificial pinecone proof of concept. Image © Chao Chen The reactive surface when open. Image © Chao Chen The reactive canopy when dry. Image © Chao Chen The reactive canopy when wet. Image © Chao Chen +19

Spotlight: Philip Johnson

10:00 - 8 July, 2015
Spotlight: Philip Johnson, The Glass House. Image © Flickr user Melody Kramer
The Glass House. Image © Flickr user Melody Kramer

When he was awarded the first ever Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1979, the jury described Philip Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) as someone who “produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the environment," adding that "as a critic and historian, he championed the cause of modern architecture and then went on to design some of his greatest buildings.” However, even after winning the Pritzker Prize at age 73, Johnson still had so much more of his legacy to build: in the years after 1979, Johnson almost completely redefined his style, adding another chapter to his influence over the architecture world.

AMO Designs Paris Pop-Up Club

08:00 - 8 July, 2015
AMO Designs Paris Pop-Up Club , ©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA
© Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA

On Saturday, July 4, designer Prada and AMO—a research studio subset of OMA architecture—hosted The Miu Miu Club, a pop-up event, featuring dinner, a fashion show, and several musical performances in Paris, France.

Inside of the 1937 art deco Palais d-Iena, Paris’ current CESE government offices, the one-night event was held in the Hypostyle, using a scaffolding ring to create a “room within a room.” Strip lighting, metal grids, PVC sheets, and arrangements of luxurious furniture were also used to enhance the space. 

©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA ©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA © Alberto Moncada, Courtesy of OMA ©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA +11