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Urban Realm: The Latest Architecture and News

CROSSROADS : Life in the Resilient City Documentary for SBAU 2021 Explores Dwellers' Experience of Rapidly Changing Urban Environments

Created in association with the Seoul Biennale Of Architecture And Urbanism 2021, the documentary CROSSROADS: Life in the Resilient City pieces together five stories illustrating how individuals appropriate the rapidly changing urban environments of New York, Seoul, Mumbai, Paris and Nairobi. Created by cinematographer Nils Clauss, together with filmmaker and videographer Neil Dowling, the film captures architecture and urban landscape as both the backdrop and the protagonist of these narratives blending reality and imagination.

CROSSROADS : Life in the Resilient City Documentary for SBAU 2021 Explores Dwellers' Experience of Rapidly Changing Urban EnvironmentsCROSSROADS : Life in the Resilient City Documentary for SBAU 2021 Explores Dwellers' Experience of Rapidly Changing Urban EnvironmentsCROSSROADS : Life in the Resilient City Documentary for SBAU 2021 Explores Dwellers' Experience of Rapidly Changing Urban EnvironmentsCROSSROADS : Life in the Resilient City Documentary for SBAU 2021 Explores Dwellers' Experience of Rapidly Changing Urban Environments+ 10

The Shape of Our Existing Buildings

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Jeffry Burchard explores in his essay the "opportunity found by extending the life and purpose of viable existing buildings", that have shaped our cities. Arguing that "we have an abundant supply of buildings", the author proposes four essential steps to transform existing buildings.

Deck Parks are Increasingly in Vogue, But Are They Always a Good Fit?

"Deck parks are increasingly in vogue in the Southwest’s downtown cores but aren’t a good fit for El Paso," writes Sito Negron. Recently a lot of cities around the world have been rethinking urban spaces dedicated to transportation, introducing public areas over highways while expanding the vehicular realm. In this week's reprint from the Architect's Newspaper, the author explores the limits of this trend and questions its implementation in some cases.

GeoGuessr Game Uses Street View to Create a Geographical Puzzle

A geographic discovery game based on Google imagery, GeoGuessr requires players to guess various locations worldwide using only the clues provided by a Street view. Created in 2013, the game has taken on new relevance amidst the pandemic, as it provides a virtual travel experience. From desolate roads to famous sites, the game teases deductive reasoning, requiring players to make use of any clue, from signs, language, flags, landscape, to pinpoint their surroundings.

GeoGuessr Game Uses Street View to Create a Geographical PuzzleGeoGuessr Game Uses Street View to Create a Geographical PuzzleGeoGuessr Game Uses Street View to Create a Geographical PuzzleGeoGuessr Game Uses Street View to Create a Geographical Puzzle+ 10

Emanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein from Christ & Gantenbein to Curate Uzbekistan's First Participation at the 2021 Venice Biennale

“Mahalla: Urban Rural Living” is the first participation of the Republic of Uzbekistan at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia. Open to the public from May 22 to November 21, 2021, at Quarta Tesa, Arsenale, the exhibition is curated by Emanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein, professors of architecture and design at ETH Zurich, and founding partners of Christ & Gantenbein.

Emanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein from Christ & Gantenbein to Curate Uzbekistan's First Participation at the 2021 Venice BiennaleEmanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein from Christ & Gantenbein to Curate Uzbekistan's First Participation at the 2021 Venice BiennaleEmanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein from Christ & Gantenbein to Curate Uzbekistan's First Participation at the 2021 Venice BiennaleEmanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein from Christ & Gantenbein to Curate Uzbekistan's First Participation at the 2021 Venice Biennale+ 7

The Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and Future

Abandoned amusement park, Pripyat. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/oinkylicious/2329332355/in/photolist-4xQrmF-Zy21ao-Kk1D9g-Gb2HP2-Gbd54x-JowQgL-Gbd2dH-kmncdm-HhH4ar-vjHaG4-UEr5H6-a18skw-4Jfgyq-a15xDt-b8aKqR-79Cs8L-7f8k5o-6mTumV-AchudK-nMskBH-21Paa6J-YtFY7A-Zym38a-GqNxX-Zu4Rj7-Zvy49y-o4Cvtz-GvJskr-Zvy4ZV-a18r3j-nMrmxp-22mw4E4-a18sfj-9pfhyd-a18srJ-6mTu12-8AFucS-6mTu6v-6mXBWu-a18q1b-6mXBNJ-a18rMf-a15AuP-a15Aor-aR4JPT-CJcGwg-d7Z5uq-GqPr6-GqKb1-a15B3P'>Flickr user oinkylicious</a> licensed under <a href=' https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Abandoned amusement park, Pripyat. Image © Flickr user oinkylicious licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

April 26th saw the 32nd anniversary of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster, with the explosion of the Reactor 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine causing the direct deaths of 31 people, the spreading of radioactive clouds across Europe, and the effective decommissioning of 19 miles of land in all directions from the plant. Thirty-two years later, a dual reading of the landscape is formed: one of engineering extremes, and one of eeriness and desolation.

As the anniversary of the disaster and its fallout passes, we have explored the past, present, and future of the architecture of Chernobyl, charting the journey of a landscape which has burned and smoldered, but may yet rise from the ashes.

The Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and FutureThe Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and FutureThe Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and FutureThe Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and Future+ 18