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Chernobyl: The Latest Architecture and News

The Architecture of Chernobyl: Past, Present, and Future

14:30 - 30 April, 2018
Abandoned amusement park, Pripyat. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/oinkylicious/2329332355/in/photolist-4xQrmF-Zy21ao-Kk1D9g-Gb2HP2-Gbd54x-JowQgL-Gbd2dH-kmncdm-HhH4ar-vjHaG4-UEr5H6-a18skw-4Jfgyq-a15xDt-b8aKqR-79Cs8L-7f8k5o-6mTumV-AchudK-nMskBH-21Paa6J-YtFY7A-Zym38a-GqNxX-Zu4Rj7-Zvy49y-o4Cvtz-GvJskr-Zvy4ZV-a18r3j-nMrmxp-22mw4E4-a18sfj-9pfhyd-a18srJ-6mTu12-8AFucS-6mTu6v-6mXBWu-a18q1b-6mXBNJ-a18rMf-a15AuP-a15Aor-aR4JPT-CJcGwg-d7Z5uq-GqPr6-GqKb1-a15B3P'>Flickr user oinkylicious</a> licensed under <a href=' https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Abandoned amusement park, Pripyat. Image © Flickr user oinkylicious licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

April 26th saw the 32nd anniversary of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster, with the explosion of the Reactor 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine causing the direct deaths of 31 people, the spreading of radioactive clouds across Europe, and the effective decommissioning of 19 miles of land in all directions from the plant. Thirty-two years later, a dual reading of the landscape is formed: one of engineering extremes, and one of eeriness and desolation.

As the anniversary of the disaster and its fallout passes, we have explored the past, present, and future of the architecture of Chernobyl, charting the journey of a landscape which has burned and smoldered, but may yet rise from the ashes.

Reator 4, Chernobyl has been encased in the world's largest movable metal structure. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/entoropi/35375407185/in/photolist-VU1d6x-ikWQJ1-TsSEwh-9qYCRm-9r6pCQ-5m9uAf-hQxGTt-9qW5dX-9qZ86h-ikXxJp-VGwNBV-9r3mCk-9qW8b4-JnBeTu-JEs1bN-JPwDqi-5m9uKY-VTZpwk-9qW1gt-pquPBw-o5xhEA-o5CtPv-ikXzoX-9qYYe5-9qW5Cv-ViPtB3-a1f2LP-24v4vJn-ikXG5T-ikXae5-ikXbbA-HS2sCx-ikX47f-JFgyt9-ikWQvz-JFuDgD-4JaWEF-9qYUAA-4JaXwp-ikX25w-ikX5uL-9r3dEz-21K4gzj-VLhgQ8-9qZaH1-9qVN4v-9r3vVX-9qYCb9-qVuDsv-9qW9kr'>Flickr user entoropi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a> The unfinished 5th reactor at Chernobyl. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/spoilt_exile/35540029246/in/photolist-W9xWuW-8EJWzQ-8EFKjR-nYASP9-b5mfSF-KaKzfq-JoyU1p-LeqYKQ-db7Rjb-g9sy6Z-eFjTwt-8EJRUJ-9HxbYc-9ChyMP-eFqD41-9r6syY-b5jZX8-8E3Gq8-UBvtEu-eFjVJH-2cMJbu-S1h3Ni-G8UJNf-HbTHda-oDXEJ-SSthoT-JFpB8R-oDXyo-76kFmX-sfX8km-atjDdx-8EJBQm-GbcxvD-GbcuAR-FL67kj-FfKC19-G8UGMb-Gbchbv-25mkvaF-FBeQuK-HgSNsj-8EJX9S-5m9vfu-22Epjzj-fai36Q-8EJP1W-4jMERm-JFuDgD-YYzhkv-eFqCuS'>Flickr user spoilt_exile</a> licensed under <ahref='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Abandoned swimming pool, Pripyat. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/22746515@N02/26563907296/in/photolist-GtmYaE-eLaenJ-eeUnTA-SF9h32-Bo4Gq1-7f8nJw-uQ48C-6qxrvs-9BV2oD-HFWifd-6qxqAm-eLaehW-4JEQH3-RX8AcC-SNS9DU-RPNywP-TC6jR6-7FU6vg-D3PFi5-UYXshy-eLaeey-SSsDqz-V3p7Lt-TNWtAx-TNRUWT-TKSjx9-V3se2D-TKVEVC-TKWHey-6w9yh1-TNqymV-TNVDBr-RX6McY-V3r94z-TNpNft-RzXz6U-6jNwgu-TNsYHr-UN3K7h-UQEByr-V3rvgz-UYsKFu-UQKsgt-TKrHko-UMYEZY-9dGEHv-XRsh7D-7f8k5o-XArcfz-UsfA6W'>Flickr user Bert Kaufmann</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> Abandoned amusement park, Pripyat. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/thedakotakid/6216419723/in/photolist-atjM1p-9qZbyw-fai36Q-VU1fxr-fahXd9-o1wcX3-Dy5et5-VU1d6x-ikWQJ1-TsSEwh-9qYCRm-9r6pCQ-5m9uAf-hQxGTt-9qW5dX-9qZ86h-ikXxJp-VGwNBV-9r3mCk-9qW8b4-JnBeTu-JEs1bN-JPwDqi-5m9uKY-VTZpwk-9qW1gt-pquPBw-o5xhEA-o5CtPv-ikXzoX-9qYYe5-9qW5Cv-ViPtB3-a1f2LP-24v4vJn-ikXG5T-ikXae5-ikXbbA-HS2sCx-ikX47f-JFgyt9-ikWQvz-JFuDgD-4JaWEF-9qYUAA-4JaXwp-ikX25w-ikX5uL-9r3dEz-21K4gzj'>Flickr user thedakotakid</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 18

Open Call: Slavutych 86 Festival of Film and Urbanism Residency

12:40 - 19 February, 2018
Open Call: Slavutych 86 Festival of Film and Urbanism Residency, Map of Slavutych. The city was built in 1986 to rehouse the workers at Chernobyl NPP. Each district was built by a different Soviet Republic, expressing different vernaculars and Soviet modernism.
Map of Slavutych. The city was built in 1986 to rehouse the workers at Chernobyl NPP. Each district was built by a different Soviet Republic, expressing different vernaculars and Soviet modernism.

86 Festival of Film and Urbanism (9th-13th May 2018) is an annual festival that takes places in the city of Slavutych, the city built to re-house the workers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and their families after the explosion in 1986. Different Soviet Republics were invited to build a district in Slavutych, which upon completion were named accordingly - Vilnius, Riga, Moscow, Baku etc.

6 Structures Designed to Save Humanity From Itself

10:50 - 26 April, 2016
6 Structures Designed to Save Humanity From Itself

On April 26th 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the city of Pripyat in northern Ukraine suffered a catastrophic failure, resulting in a nuclear meltdown and a series of explosions which scattered radioactive material across large areas of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia. More than 50,000 people were evacuated the following day, and over the next 14 years another 300,000 people were moved, leading to an exclusion zone today measuring 2,600 square kilometers that will likely remain in place for hundreds of years. To this day, the human cost of the disaster is still unknown, with estimates that in their lifetimes, anywhere between 4,000 and 200,000 people will be affected by cancers attributable to the incident. Along with the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster of 2011, the Chernobyl Disaster is one of only two level 7 nuclear events in history.

Today, exactly 30 years later, the incident at Chernobyl remains one of the most poignant demonstrations of humanity’s mastery over its environment, and also one of the most powerful demonstrations of how easily, and how catastrophically, that mastery can go awry. But humans are if nothing else resilient, and throughout history have used every means at their disposal to put right the problems they have caused for themselves - including a number of structures constructed to mitigate the effects of man-made disasters, both from humanity’s past and its possible future.