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Daniel Libeskind: The Latest Architecture and News

5 Art Movements that Influenced Architecture

As far as history goes back, art and architecture have always been interrelated disciplines. From the elaboration of the Baroque movement, to the geometric framework of modernism, architects found inspiration from stylistic approaches, techniques, and concepts of historic art movements, and translated them into large-scale habitable structures. In this article, we explore 5 of many art movements that paved the way for modern day architecture, looking into how architects borrowed from their characteristics and approaches to design to create their very own architectural compositions.

Pop Art Influence on Architecture. Image via Flickr User Ruth Hartnup | Flickr User Noel Y. Calingasan (nyclovesnyc)Surrealist Render. Image © Victor EnrichPop Art Influence on Architecture. Image © Jamie McGregor SmithDe Stijl Influence on Architecture. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Claude Truong-Ngoc+ 13

Daniel Libeskind Revives his Polish Hometown with the Łódź Architecture Center

Daniel Libeskind and inLodz21 Institution are designing Nexus21, an urban revitalization project of 21 structures that vary between residential and commercial buildings to urban spaces. The new cultural hub is located in particular neighborhoods to promote the creativity and innovation that lies in the city, such as architecture, textiles, fashion, and film, which are all part of its heritage. The master plan will also work on the spaces in between the revived structures, creating a vibrant nexus between the old and the new, while adding value to the historic neighborhoods of Łódź, Poland.

Courtesy of Studio LibeskindCourtesy of Studio LibeskindCourtesy of Studio LibeskindCourtesy of Studio Libeskind+ 4

Works by David Adjaye, Daniel Libeskind, and More for Bid to Support Black Women Architecture Students

Architecture for Change (ARCH), a newly launched nonprofit initiative dedicated to addressing systemic racism in the architecture and design industry, is kicking off with an online auction featuring donated works—sketches, models, plans, photographic prints, and more—from a host of notable architects including Sir David Adjaye, Daniel Libeskind, Michel Rojkind, David Rockwell, Jennifer Bonner, Trey Trahan, and others.

Architects, not Architecture: Daniel Libeskind

Architects, not Architecture decided to open their archive to help us cope with the current situation of not being able to go out as usual and create a source of inspiration and entertainment through sharing one of the unique talks from their previous 35 events, which have never been published before – including, Tatiana Bilbao, Peter Cook, Richard Rogers, Massimiliano Fuksas, Kim Herforth Nielsen, Ben van Berkel, Benedetta Tagliabue, Anupama Kundoo, Sadie Morgan, Dan Stubbergaard, Manuelle Gautrand and Kjetil Thorsen.

Every week, Archdaily will be sharing one of the Architects, not Architecture. talks which they are currently publishing online in the form of daily full-length video uploads as part of their “new event”: Home Edition 2020 (www.architectsnotarchitecture.com).

Inside the Homes of Eight Famous Architects

Originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "Inside the Homes and Workspaces of 8 Great Architects", this article shows the spaces occupied by some of the best-known architects in the world. Documented for an exhibition that will be featured at the Milan Design Week 2014, the images give a glimpse inside the private worlds of some of our favorite designers.

It's a cliche that architects have messy workspaces. From chaos comes creation, so the phrase goes. But an upcoming exhibition at this year's Salone del Mobile intends to dispel the myth. Studio Mumbai.

Curator Francesca Molteni interviewed each of the designers in their private homes and came away with one finding: architects are actually quite tidy. The studios are all pristinely ordered; books are neatly stowed away, figurines and objets astutely displayed, and table tops swept clean. The photographs below are part of the exhibition materials, produced with the help of scenographer Davide Pizzigoni, which faithfully document the physical environments in images, video, and audio. These will be used to recreate the architects’ “rooms” at Salone del Mobile in April.

Where Architects Live is not limited to satisfying our curiosity about what these architects’ homes look like. Richard Rogers’ affirmation that “a room is the beginning of a city” resonates with the project’s aim in trying to articulate its subjects’ personal tastes and obsessions, and how those are reflected in their architectural work.

Read on to see more images of the inside of architects' homes and studios

© Davide Pizzigoni© Davide Pizzigoni© Romulo Fialdini© Davide Pizzigoni+ 17

Daniel Libeskind Creates Installation to Mark Auschwitz Liberation

Daniel Libeskind has collaborated with photographer Caryl Englander and curator Henri Lustiger Thaler from the Amud Aish Memorial Museum to present a temporary exhibition at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum. “Through the Lens of Faith” opens on July 1st, 2019, marking the 75th anniversary of the concentration camp’s liberation in 1945.

© Studio Libeskind© Studio Libeskind© Studio Libeskind© Studio Libeskind+ 6

Watch Daniel Libeskind's Advice for Young Architects

Louisiana Channel has released a video interview conducted with world-renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, where he advises young architects to follow their dreams, take risks, and expose themselves to the possibilities of short term sacrifice for long term gain. Reflecting on the pace of change, Libeskind says “the world is always changing, but not very slowly. It changes just suddenly. It doesn’t change by evolution, it changes suddenly. If a young architect realizes this, it is a big help. It took me a while to realize that.”

Daniel Libeskind to Design the Regional Museum of Iquique in Northern Chile

“The Dragon of Tarapacá,” a new project for Museo Antropológico Regional de Iquique (Regional Museum of Iquique) that will overlook Playa Huayquique, is moving forward with the design presented by Daniel Libeskind. The proposal comes after extensive work that began in December of last year, when the American-born architect visited Chile to familiarize himself with the the project, originally proposed by Mauricio Soria Macchiavello, the local mayor.

The first inklings of the project started almost 30 years ago, as the city sought to optimize the spaces along the coastline, allowing residents better access to the sea and optimizing the community's public spaces. 

Thesis Works of Daniel Libeskind, Liz Diller and Others Exhibited at the Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York has unveiled an exhibition showcasing 50 years of undergraduate architectural thesis projects by students of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture.

Drawing together the works of Elizabeth Diller, Laurie Hawkinson, Daniel Libeskind, and others, the exhibition titled “Archive and Artifact: The Virtual and the Physical” presents hand-drawn, digital, and three-dimensional works.

Margaux Wheelock-Shew The Factory of Fake Autonomy: Reassembling the Social Landscape of Labor. Thesis, 2017-18. Photo by Lea Bertucci. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper UnionAuthor: Stanley Allen. Project Title: The Theater of Production. Course/AY: Thesis, 1980-81.  Professors: John Hejduk, Raimund Abraham, Anthony Candido, Ricardo Scofidio, Robert Slutzky, Bernard Tschumi. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper UnionAuthor: Daniel Libeskind. Project Title: Collage. Course/AY: Thesis, 1969-70. Professors: John Hejduk, Lewis Davis, Robert Slutzky, Fred Travsiano. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper UnionAuthor: Edward Arcari. Project Title: Construction Site. Course/AY: Thesis, 1985-86. Professors: John Hejduk, Donald Wall, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union+ 13

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan BaanSerpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan BaanSerpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John OffenbachSerpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes+ 20

Color, Form, and Material: Andres Gallardo Spotlights Berlin's Post-War Modernist Charm

In the next chapter of his ongoing Urban Geometry project, self-taught Spanish photographer Andres Gallardo captures the elements of color, form, and materiality of post-war architecture in Berlin. This photo series, with installments featuring the modern marvels of Beijing, Seoul, Copenhagen, and Tallinn, among other cities, has become representative of Gallardo's personal growth from his humble start in his career as a professional photographer.

© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo© Andres Gallardo+ 21

Life on the Moon, According to 8 Architects and Artists

Following the announcement by SpaceX founder Elon Musk that Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa would be the first paying customer to visit the Moon, the retail tycoon generated further excitement by declaring he would bring between six and eight artists to accompany him.

The “Dear Moon” project would see a painter, musician, film director, and others, accompany Maezawa in order to “dream dreams that have never been dreamed…to sing songs that have never been sung, to paint that which has never been seen before.”