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Daniel Libeskind: The Latest Architecture and News

Inside the Homes of Eight Famous Architects

05:30 - 12 July, 2019
Inside the Homes of Eight Famous Architects, Shigeru Ban's Tokyo house. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai
Shigeru Ban's Tokyo house. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai

Originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "Inside the Homes and Workspaces of 8 Great Architects", this article shows the spaces occupied by some of the best-known architects in the world. Documented for an exhibition that will be featured at the Milan Design Week 2014, the images give a glimpse inside the private worlds of some of our favorite designers.

It's a cliche that architects have messy workspaces. From chaos comes creation, so the phrase goes. But an upcoming exhibition at this year's Salone del Mobile intends to dispel the myth. Studio Mumbai.

Curator Francesca Molteni interviewed each of the designers in their private homes and came away with one finding: architects are actually quite tidy. The studios are all pristinely ordered; books are neatly stowed away, figurines and objets astutely displayed, and table tops swept clean. The photographs below are part of the exhibition materials, produced with the help of scenographer Davide Pizzigoni, which faithfully document the physical environments in images, video, and audio. These will be used to recreate the architects’ “rooms” at Salone del Mobile in April.

Where Architects Live is not limited to satisfying our curiosity about what these architects’ homes look like. Richard Rogers’ affirmation that “a room is the beginning of a city” resonates with the project’s aim in trying to articulate its subjects’ personal tastes and obsessions, and how those are reflected in their architectural work.

Read on to see more images of the inside of architects' homes and studios

© Davide Pizzigoni © Davide Pizzigoni © Romulo Fialdini © Davide Pizzigoni + 17

Daniel Libeskind Creates Installation to Mark Auschwitz Liberation

07:35 - 31 May, 2019
Daniel Libeskind Creates Installation to Mark Auschwitz Liberation, © Studio Libeskind
© Studio Libeskind

Daniel Libeskind has collaborated with photographer Caryl Englander and curator Henri Lustiger Thaler from the Amud Aish Memorial Museum to present a temporary exhibition at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum. “Through the Lens of Faith” opens on July 1st, 2019, marking the 75th anniversary of the concentration camp’s liberation in 1945.

© Studio Libeskind © Studio Libeskind © Studio Libeskind © Studio Libeskind + 6

Watch Daniel Libeskind's Advice for Young Architects

08:30 - 24 April, 2019

Louisiana Channel has released a video interview conducted with world-renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, where he advises young architects to follow their dreams, take risks, and expose themselves to the possibilities of short term sacrifice for long term gain. Reflecting on the pace of change, Libeskind says “the world is always changing, but not very slowly. It changes just suddenly. It doesn’t change by evolution, it changes suddenly. If a young architect realizes this, it is a big help. It took me a while to realize that.”

Daniel Libeskind to Design the Regional Museum of Iquique in Northern Chile

08:30 - 21 March, 2019
Daniel Libeskind to Design the Regional Museum of Iquique in Northern Chile, Cortesía de I. Municipalidad de Iquique y autorías ©StudioLibeskind
Cortesía de I. Municipalidad de Iquique y autorías ©StudioLibeskind

“The Dragon of Tarapacá,” a new project for Museo Antropológico Regional de Iquique (Regional Museum of Iquique) that will overlook Playa Huayquique, is moving forward with the design presented by Daniel Libeskind. The proposal comes after extensive work that began in December of last year, when the American-born architect visited Chile to familiarize himself with the the project, originally proposed by Mauricio Soria Macchiavello, the local mayor.

The first inklings of the project started almost 30 years ago, as the city sought to optimize the spaces along the coastline, allowing residents better access to the sea and optimizing the community's public spaces. 

Thesis Works of Daniel Libeskind, Liz Diller and Others Exhibited at the Cooper Union

09:00 - 1 November, 2018
Thesis Works of Daniel Libeskind, Liz Diller and Others Exhibited at the Cooper Union, Author: Christian Dickson. Project Title: The Mark of Cain and Cain’s Mark. Course/AY: Thesis, 1991-92. Professors: John Hejduk, Roderick Knox, Sean Sculley, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union
Author: Christian Dickson. Project Title: The Mark of Cain and Cain’s Mark. Course/AY: Thesis, 1991-92. Professors: John Hejduk, Roderick Knox, Sean Sculley, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York has unveiled an exhibition showcasing 50 years of undergraduate architectural thesis projects by students of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture.

Drawing together the works of Elizabeth Diller, Laurie Hawkinson, Daniel Libeskind, and others, the exhibition titled “Archive and Artifact: The Virtual and the Physical” presents hand-drawn, digital, and three-dimensional works.

Margaux Wheelock-Shew The Factory of Fake Autonomy: Reassembling the Social Landscape of Labor. Thesis, 2017-18. Photo by Lea Bertucci. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Stanley Allen. Project Title: The Theater of Production. Course/AY: Thesis, 1980-81.  Professors: John Hejduk, Raimund Abraham, Anthony Candido, Ricardo Scofidio, Robert Slutzky, Bernard Tschumi. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Daniel Libeskind. Project Title: Collage. Course/AY: Thesis, 1969-70. Professors: John Hejduk, Lewis Davis, Robert Slutzky, Fred Travsiano. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Edward Arcari. Project Title: Construction Site. Course/AY: Thesis, 1985-86. Professors: John Hejduk, Donald Wall, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union + 13

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

09:30 - 18 October, 2018
Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions, Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes + 20

Color, Form, and Material: Andres Gallardo Spotlights Berlin's Post-War Modernist Charm

12:00 - 6 October, 2018
Color, Form, and Material: Andres Gallardo Spotlights Berlin's Post-War Modernist Charm, © Andres Gallardo
© Andres Gallardo

In the next chapter of his ongoing Urban Geometry project, self-taught Spanish photographer Andres Gallardo captures the elements of color, form, and materiality of post-war architecture in Berlin. This photo series, with installments featuring the modern marvels of Beijing, Seoul, Copenhagen, and Tallinn, among other cities, has become representative of Gallardo's personal growth from his humble start in his career as a professional photographer.

© Andres Gallardo © Andres Gallardo © Andres Gallardo © Andres Gallardo + 21

Life on the Moon, According to 8 Architects and Artists

11:00 - 2 October, 2018
Life on the Moon, According to 8 Architects and Artists, Asif Khan's Vantablack Pavilion at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Image © Luke Hayes
Asif Khan's Vantablack Pavilion at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Image © Luke Hayes

Following the announcement by SpaceX founder Elon Musk that Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa would be the first paying customer to visit the Moon, the retail tycoon generated further excitement by declaring he would bring between six and eight artists to accompany him.

The “Dear Moon” project would see a painter, musician, film director, and others, accompany Maezawa in order to “dream dreams that have never been dreamed…to sing songs that have never been sung, to paint that which has never been seen before.”

Drawings by Tchoban, Holl, and Calatrava Among Stunning Entries for the First Athens Architecture Club Exhibition

14:00 - 16 August, 2018
Drawings by Tchoban, Holl, and Calatrava Among Stunning Entries for the First Athens Architecture Club Exhibition, New Entry 5 / Sergei Tchoban (Gold Medal Winner). Image Courtesy of The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design
New Entry 5 / Sergei Tchoban (Gold Medal Winner). Image Courtesy of The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design

Russian-German architect Sergei Tchoban of Tchoban Voss Architekten has won the Gold Medal in the First Athens Architecture Club Exhibition, organized by the Chicago Athenaeum and The European Centre for Architecture Art Design. Participating architects included Steven Holl, Daniel Libeskind, and Santiago Calatrava.

The Athens Architecture Club seeks to resurrect the historical architecture clubs of the 19th century, functioning as an “open forum, an infrastructural framework, and support platform for architects, artists, and writers to discuss, challenge and enrich a dialogue among practitioners and scholars.

Monster / Alessandro Mendini. Image Courtesy of The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design View of Lyon / James Von Klemperer. Image Courtesy of The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design Concept Sketch of Imperial War Museum North / Daniel Libeskind. Image Courtesy of The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design The Dance / Santiago Calatrava. Image Courtesy of The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design + 6

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

14:00 - 11 June, 2018
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public.

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan + 38

Daniel Libeskind Retraces his Life and Architectural Career in Engaging In-Depth Interview

14:00 - 24 May, 2018
Daniel Libeskind Retraces his Life and Architectural Career in Engaging In-Depth Interview, North Pool looking Southeast. Image © Joe Woolhead
North Pool looking Southeast. Image © Joe Woolhead

Louisiana Channel has released a new video interview with acclaimed architect Daniel Libeskind, in which he retraces the story behind his architectural career. In the interview, Libeskind unravels his view of architecture, and the architectural profession, drawing comparisons between architecture and music, while reflecting on the adherence to legislation and inherent optimistic outlook required to practice architecture.

In the 30-minute in-depth interview, Libeskind guides observers through his childhood, the roots of his architectural career, and reflects upon his most noted schemes, including the Jewish Museum in Berlin and the World Trade Center Masterplan in New York.

Spotlight: Daniel Libeskind

06:00 - 12 May, 2018
Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht
Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht

In the architecture world, few designers can claim to have a more clearly-defined style than Daniel Libeskind (born May 12, 1946). Much of Libeskind's work is instantly recognizable for its angular forms, intersecting planes, and frequent use of diagonally-sliced windows, a style that he has used to great effect in museums and memorials—but which he has equally adapted to conference centers, skyscrapers, and shopping malls.

Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht Jewish Museum, Berlin. Image © Mal Booth Dresden’s Military History Museum. Image © Bitter Bredt, Courtesy of Studio Daniel LIbeskind Mons International Congress Xperience (MICX) / Studio Libeskind + H2a Architecte & Associés. Image © Hufton+Crow + 18

Daniel Libeskind On the Poetics of Memory and Time in Architecture

16:00 - 15 April, 2018

In PLANE-SITE's latest video from their Time-Space-Existence series, Daniel Libeskind describes his work in relation to Shakespeare's quote that "time is out of joint." Weaving in his philosophy regarding time, memory and architecture, Libeskind discusses his seminal works such as the Jewish Museum Berlin and the Ground Zero master plan. These ideas will be transferred to his new project named Facing Gaia, an architectural sculpture to be located in Giardini Marinaressa, which explores the connections between climate, time, space and existence.

National Holocaust Monument. Image© Doublespace Facing Gaia Sketch. Image© Studio Libeskind Mons International Cogress Xperience. Image© Georges de Kinder Modern Art Museum Vilnius. Image© Studio Libeskind + 12

The Stories Behind 7 of the Most Iconic Eyeglasses in Architecture

09:30 - 11 December, 2017
The Stories Behind 7 of the Most Iconic Eyeglasses in Architecture

Eyeglasses: the quintessential accessory of the architect. They are mini pieces of architecture you can wear, and an outward expression of your inner persona. Whether they be square, round, or wire-frame, black, white, tortoiseshell, or bright neon tones, they represent our visionary ideals. As such, many of the most iconic spectacles have an interesting history behind them; so here are the stories behind seven of the most recognizable eyeglasses in the architecture world.

Studio Libeskind's Military Museum Through the Lens of Alexandra Timpau

08:00 - 17 November, 2017
Studio Libeskind's Military Museum Through the Lens of Alexandra Timpau, © Alexandra Timpau
© Alexandra Timpau

The complications of war and violence demanded a bold piece of architecture to provoke the public's understanding of the impact it had on Germany. Daniel Libeskind chooses to engage with such events in his extension to Dresden's Military History Museum, by crashing a huge steel and concrete structure through the neoclassical facade, tearing apart the symmetry of the original building. Photographer Alexandra Timpau has captured the sharp edges and harsh angles of the museum's extension that convey the pain and the stark reality of war Libeskind and the museum refer to.

© Alexandra Timpau © Alexandra Timpau © Alexandra Timpau © Alexandra Timpau + 28

The Unexpected First Jobs of Seven Famous Architects

09:30 - 31 July, 2017
The Unexpected First Jobs of Seven Famous Architects

Seniority is infamously important in the field of architecture. Despite occasionally being on the butt end of wage jokes, the field can actually pay relatively well—assuming that you’ve been working for a couple of decades. Even Bjarke Ingels, the tech-savvy, video-producing, Netflix-documentary-starring provocateur and founder of the ultra-contemporary BIG isn’t a millennial; at 42 the Dane is a full nine years older than Mark Zuckerberg.

As a result of this, it's common to lead a rich and complex life before finding architectural fame, and many of the world’s most successful architects started their careers off in an entirely different field. If you haven't landed your dream job yet, you may find the following list of famous architects' first gigs reassuring.