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Robert A.M. Stern: Old-Fashioned yet Unfazed

00:00 - 17 November, 2013
Robert A.M. Stern: Old-Fashioned yet Unfazed, Robert A.M Stern. Image
Robert A.M Stern. Image

In the mutable world of architecture it's easy to get distracted by the trendy new thing, be it the tallest tower or the "blobbiest" form. Robert A. M. Stern (Dean of the Yale School of Architecture and a practicing architect in his own right), on the other hand, remains purposefully old-fashioned (to the point of becoming obsolete). In an exquisitely written article for the New York Magazine, Justin Davidson reports that, despite the mockery of his colleagues, Stern seems unfazed. If his architecture has the power to inspire, he says, then he's done his job. Read the full must-see article here.

Reclaiming Rivers: The Latest Trend in Urban Design

09:30 - 7 November, 2013
Reclaiming Rivers: The Latest Trend in Urban Design, Floods in Calgary displaced over 100,000 people. Image © Wikimedia Commons
Floods in Calgary displaced over 100,000 people. Image © Wikimedia Commons

For years, rivers were a source of transport and power, upon whose banks our cities were born.  But as cities industrialized, many of them clogged with filth and disease – making them not only ugly, but dangerous.  Unless they were useful, rivers were often diverted, covered, pushed underground, and forgotten.

Not anymore. Reclaiming rivers seems to be the newest trend in urban design, and cities across the world are hopping on the bandwagon. In the UK, the Environment Council is working to restore 9,500 miles of river; in Los Angeles, the eponymous river is about to undergo a complete transformation.

Milwaukee Urban Farm Movement Grows

00:00 - 2 November, 2013
Milwaukee Urban Farm Movement Grows, Courtesy of Truly Living Well Center for Natural Urban Agriculture
Courtesy of Truly Living Well Center for Natural Urban Agriculture

After the foreclosure crisis, hundreds of cities despaired at the downturn - but in Milwaukee, the HomeGr/own Initiative saw opportunity. The organization converts empty lots into urban farms, calling upon citizens to assist in this growing local food movement. But while other cities have tried similar projects (and failed), Fast.Co reports that the HomeGr/own Initiative seems suited to last. Learn why here.

New Tel Aviv High-Rise By Richard Meier Nears Completion

14:00 - 30 October, 2013
New Tel Aviv High-Rise By Richard Meier Nears Completion, © Richard Meier
© Richard Meier

Pritzker Laureate Richard Meier’s iconic new residential tower in the heart of Tel Aviv is nearing completion. Located in Rothschild Boulevard, the city’s bustling high-end commercial, cultural and financial district, it is no surprise that over 70% of the 42-story luxury tower has already been sold.

More on the tower, and its potentially controversial context, after the break...

Could an Architecture Peace Corps Be the Answer to Student Debt?

09:30 - 30 October, 2013
The WPA completed some of the US' most famous structures. Would a similar program today make sense for recently-graduated architecture students?. Image © Wikimedia Commons
The WPA completed some of the US' most famous structures. Would a similar program today make sense for recently-graduated architecture students?. Image © Wikimedia Commons

Graduating architecture students are welcomed to the professional world with few job opportunities, lots of competition, and, for many, shockingly high student debt. Barring winning the lottery, there's nothing for it but to work the decades it takes to pay them off. But what if there was another way? Shervan Sebastian, of AIArchitect, explores a new possibility for student debt relief designed specifically for architects in "Proposal Combines Student Debt Relief with Community Design Support," reprinted here. Read on to see how you could one day pay off your student debt and help your community at the same time.

Public service loan assistance programs have for decades been a driving force in attracting talent to some of America’s neediest and underserved regions and sectors of the economy. Programs as varied as AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps as well as the medical, legal, and dental professions have all employed these incentives to provide communities with talented, civically engaged professionals, while offering one of the most coveted forms of support for financially burdened graduates: student loan assistance.

What might a national design service corps look like for the architecture profession? The AIA is proposing legislation that offers architecture school graduates loan re-payment assistance opportunities similar to those offered to graduates of other professions who contribute their services to their communities. The National Design Services Act (NDSA) provides student loan assistance for architects who work at community design centers by securing grants from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to reduce loan balances of participating students.

Talking With Thom

10:30 - 15 October, 2013
Talking With Thom, Four Towers In One (Competition). Image © Morphosis
Four Towers In One (Competition). Image © Morphosis

Despite what you may think, Thom Mayne isn't the "bad boy" of architecture - at least, not according to Thom Mayne. He sees himself more as a skilled negotiator than a starchitect (a phrase he hates) - after all, he reasons, how else would he have completed so many buildings? In this interview, originally published on Metropolis Magazine's Point of View blog as "Q&A: Thom Mayne," Andrew Caruso and Mayne discuss Morphosis, SCI-ARC, the early days of his career, and his architectural ethos.

Andrew Caruso: Your professional career began in the discipline of planning. What led to the shift toward architecture and your eventual partnership with Jim Stafford?

Thom Mayne: I started working at the Pasadena redevelopment agency doing low cost housing, and that’s where I met Jim [Stafford]. Coming out of USC, I had no background about Mies, Khan or Corbusier, for example. USC was very strong in being anti-historical, looking forward instead of backward. I was essentially naive.

Jim was a year ahead of me at USC and had part of the older regime at the school. When I met him at the planning agency, he started introducing me to history. I got fascinated by [Paul] Rudolph; and then it just took off. Jim guided me through this thought process, reestablishing me in the tradition of architecture.

Beyond the Tent: Why Refugee Camps Need Architects (Now More than Ever)

09:30 - 14 October, 2013
Beyond the Tent: Why Refugee Camps Need Architects (Now More than Ever), Courtesy of refugeecamp.ca
Courtesy of refugeecamp.ca

In 2013 alone some 1 million people have poured out of Syria to escape a civil conflict that has been raging for over two years. The total number of Syrian refugees is well over 2 million, an unprecedented number and a disturbing reality that has put the host countries under immense infrastructural strain.

Host countries at least have a protocol they can follow, however. UN Handbooks are consulted and used to inform an appropriate approach to camp planning issues. Land is negotiated for and a grid layout is set. The method, while general, is meticulous – adequate for an issue with an expiration date.

Or at least it would be if the issue were, in fact, temporary.

London Calling: How to Solve the Housing Crisis

09:30 - 2 October, 2013
London Calling: How to Solve the Housing Crisis, Nakagin Capsule Tower / Kisho Kurokawa. Image Courtesy of arcspace
Nakagin Capsule Tower / Kisho Kurokawa. Image Courtesy of arcspace

In recent weeks both the national papers and the London Evening Standard have been reporting dramatic increases in the price of houses in the capital. Up 8% in a year they say. This isn’t great. Rents are also rising sharply. Soon, many, particularly young, Londoners will be trapped, unable to rent or buy.  No doubt this is increasingly the case in many big cities. But England is still arguably in a recession, the worst for nearly a century. 

In an attempt to find affordable homes people move further away from their work, especially those on low wages, and spend too much of their salary and their time commuting. The cost of housing affects what we eat, whether we exercise and how much spare time we have. It affects our quality of life.

So, this is not about business or property. It’s more important. This is about home. Home is a refuge. It’s our emotional harbour. In fact it is a human right. As the UN Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights states: it is 'the right of everyone to an adequate standard of living for himself and his family, including adequate ... housing'. 

Can architects help? Yes. As architects, we need to ask what home actually is, and, how it fits into the city. Indeed, the answer is as much anthropological as it is architectural, as it lies in re-thinking the house itself, in creating - not housing - but homes.

A Delightfully Candid Interview with Chicago's Lifetime Achievement Winner: Stanley Tigerman

00:00 - 29 September, 2013
A Delightfully Candid Interview with Chicago's Lifetime Achievement Winner: Stanley Tigerman, © Wikimedia Commons
© Wikimedia Commons

Stanley Tigerman, an outspoken force on the Chicago architecture scene, was recently bestowed (much to his amazement) AIA Chicago's highest honour: the Lifetime Achievement Award. "I’ve done some damage to them and I’m aware of it. I’ve challenged them..." he explains to Meg Graham of Chicago Grid. "So that they then turn around in a way and turn the other cheek and give me this award does not go unnoticed by me. And I’m thrilled by it." You can find the full, wonderfully entertaining interview, in which he discusses the award, keeping up in a digital world, and getting older (without becoming "ridiculous"),here.

In Tokyo, A Vertical Farm Inside and Out

00:00 - 29 September, 2013
In Tokyo, A Vertical Farm Inside and Out, Courtesy of Kono Designs
Courtesy of Kono Designs

As young people migrate to cities in ever growing numbers, so grows the concern for the future of agriculture. Prototypes for urban/vertical farms have been developed and, considering projected urban growth, seem a likely forecast for our future.

In the offices of Pasona, the future has already arrived. The Tokyo based recruitment agency has dedicated 20% of their 215,000 square foot office to growing fresh vegetables, making it the largest urban farm in Japan.

Preston Bus Station Listed, Escapes Demolition

00:00 - 24 September, 2013
Preston Bus Station Listed, Escapes Demolition, © Wikimedia Commons
© Wikimedia Commons

Following news last week that four post-war buildings had been listed in the UK, the campaign to Save Preston Bus Station reached a victory today when it was announced that Ed Vaizey (Architecture and Heritage Minister) has listed the Brutalist icon, removing the threat of demolition. The campaign, which has garnered words of support from the likes of Richard Rogers and Rem Koolhaas, has been been underpinned by support from Angela Brady PRIBA, former President of the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Could Ho Chi Minh City's Architecture Be Saved by Its Economic Rut?

09:30 - 22 September, 2013
Could Ho Chi Minh City's Architecture Be Saved by Its Economic Rut?, Ho Chi Minh City by night. Image © Wikimedia Commons
Ho Chi Minh City by night. Image © Wikimedia Commons

In this article, originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "A Time-Out," Carl Robinson reminisces about the architecture of the Ho Chi Minh City he remembers from the 1960s and discusses how the urban landscape has changed in subsequent years. As Vietnam grapples with economic downturn, he asks, how might the city to develop?

Over the past 15 years, as Vietnam finally left its long years of war behind, the former capital of South Vietnam—Saigon—became the country’s economic powerhouse. Until fairly recently, Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) was a boomtown. Even before touching down at its busy international airport, I see new buildings rising up through the sprawling and tightly packed suburbs, splayed across the city’s surrounding delta landscape and muddy meandering rivers.

Off in the distance along the wide Saigon River, where the spires of the city’s French Colonial Roman Catholic cathedral once dominated downtown, an impressive silhouette of high-rises reach to the tropical sky. The city’s twenty-first-century feel continues through its sweeping new terminal (designed by GWA) and then down a wide boulevard past contemporary office buildings and shops. Eventually I reach the intimate tree-lined streets of old Saigon, the residential quarter created by the French more than 150 years ago.

Honoring Architecture's Digital Pioneers

09:30 - 20 September, 2013
Honoring Architecture's Digital Pioneers, A Hoberman arch at the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City. Chuck Hoberman is one of the architects highlighted in the ongoing "Archaeology of the Digital". Image © Wikimedia Commons
A Hoberman arch at the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City. Chuck Hoberman is one of the architects highlighted in the ongoing "Archaeology of the Digital". Image © Wikimedia Commons

Many would consider Greg Lynn the leader of computer-aided design in architecture - but Lynn himself begs to differ. He and the Canadian Centre for Architecture recently collaborated on "Archaeology of the Digital," the first in a series of exhibitions that will showcase the work of the earliest adopters of digital techniques in architecture. The exhibit, which opened on May 7, focuses on work by Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, Chuck Hoberman, and Shoei Yoh. In this interview, originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "Computer Control," Avinash Rajagopal speaks with Greg Lynn about some of the projects and the inspiration behind the exhibit itself.

AD Classics: The Tate Modern / Herzog & de Meuron

00:00 - 17 September, 2013
AD Classics: The Tate Modern / Herzog & de Meuron, © wikimedia commons
© wikimedia commons

London’s Bankside Power Station stood disused from 1981 until 2000, when it opened to the public as The Tate Modern. Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron approached the conversion with a relatively light hand, creating a contemporary public space without diminishing the building's historical presence. The impressive cultural icon has since become the most visited museum of modern art in the world, revitalizing its formerly sequestered, industrial neighborhood.

© Javier Gutierrez Marcos © Simone Graziano Panetto © Simone Graziano Panetto © Darrell Godliman + 18

Eight Years Later, A Post-Katrina Report Card

18:00 - 14 September, 2013
Eight Years Later, A Post-Katrina Report Card, A landscaped pedestrian path that was part of the construction efforts post-Katrina. Image © Wikimedia Commons
A landscaped pedestrian path that was part of the construction efforts post-Katrina. Image © Wikimedia Commons

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, design charettes involving the Gulf coast community led to many proposals, ranging from the large-scale (establishing Gulfport as a major harbor city) to the more personal (bike paths). Eight years after the fact, many of these projects are still in progress, or have yet to begin - but the outlook remains bright. The Sun-Herald's Michael Newsom explores the background behind these efforts, and explains the hurdles they’ve faced along the way. Read the full piece here.

AD Classics: The National Art Schools of Cuba / Ricardo Porro, Vittorio Garatti, Roberto Gottardi

10:30 - 12 September, 2013
AD Classics: The National Art Schools of Cuba / Ricardo Porro, Vittorio Garatti, Roberto Gottardi, School of Ballet by Vittorio Garatti . Image © Adrián Guerra Rey via places.designobserver.com
School of Ballet by Vittorio Garatti . Image © Adrián Guerra Rey via places.designobserver.com

“Cuba will count as having the most beautiful academy of arts in the world.” - Fidel Castro (1961)

The Cuban National Schools of Arts, originally imagined by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in 1961, are perhaps the largest architectural achievements of the Cuban Revolution. The innovative design of the schools, which aimed to bring cultural literacy to the nation, encapsulated the radical, utopian vision of the Revolution. Unfortunately, the nation’s idealistic enthusiasm lasted for a fleeting moment in time and the Schools quickly fell out of favor; they were left to decay before even being completed. Today, following nearly four decades of neglect, the architects have returned to try and bring these derelict schools to back to their intended glory.

School of Ballet by Vittorio Garatti . Image © John Loomis: Revolution of Forms Site plan. Image © John Loomis: Revolution of Forms School of Modern Dance by Ricardo PorroSchool of Modern Dance by Ricardo Porro. Image © Adrián MALLOL i MORETTI School of Plastic Arts by Ricardo Porro. Image © Norma Barbacci/World Monuments Fund + 64

When Urban Planning Gets Political: The History of Taksim Square

00:00 - 14 June, 2013
When Urban Planning Gets Political: The History of Taksim Square, via Plataforma Urbana
via Plataforma Urbana

Over the last two weeks, the world has witnessed history unfold in a small park in the heart of Istanbul, Taksim Square. What started out as a peaceful protest to save Gezi Park and its trees from destruction has turned into a country-wide (and, to some degree, worldwide) movement that rejects the ever-increasing autocratic tendencies of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

The urban policies and projects that PM Erdogan and his government have been loutishly implementing in Istanbul offer only a few examples of the way this government has manifested its undemocratic attitudes. In that regard, it would be misleading to consider the protest over Taksim and Gezi Park as an isolated incident. Instead, development over Istanbul’s quintessential square constitutes the last straw in a series of neo-liberal policies, themselves the result of a century of history, that have shaped Istanbul over the course of the last decade.

More after the break...

Richard Rogers Joins Preservation Efforts for Preston Bus Station

00:00 - 3 June, 2013
Richard Rogers Joins Preservation Efforts for Preston Bus Station, © Wikimedia Commons
© Wikimedia Commons

As reported by BDOnline, Richard Rogers of Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners has announced his support in the long-standing battle to save England’s Preston Bus Station from demolition. In a letter to the English Heritage, Rogers described the 1969 brutalist landmark as “truly a major modern building and an outstanding piece of 20th century architecture” that is in dire need of refurbishment.

“Preston Bus Station is not only admired internationally, but it also continues to be fully functioning. It is a critical transport hub,” he stated. “I would encourage you to consider listing the bus station and support a much-needed refurbishment.”