RIBA To Launch Retrospective of Edwin Smith’s Photography

To coincide with the opening of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)’s new Architecture Gallery at their headquarters in London’s Portland Place, the first major retrospective of Edwin Smith will open next month. Smith, one of Britain’s foremost 20th century photographers, was considered a master of capturing the essence of the places, landscapes and buildings he documented over an extensive career. The exhibition, entitled Ordinary Beauty, will display over a hundred carefully curated black and white images from a collection of over 60,000 negatives and 20,000 prints donated by Olive Cook, Smith’s widow and collaborator, to the RIBA Library.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Shows Workload Forecasts Are Firmly In Positive Territory

Courtesy of RIBA

The results of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBAFuture Trends Survey for June show that the Workload Index among UK practices increased slightly to +34 (from +33 in May) with confidence levels amongst RIBA practices about the level of future workloads remaining “very strong and widespread across the whole of the UK”. Whereas last month’s survey showed Wales and the West with the brightest outlook, this month’s survey saw Scotland top the index with a balance figure of +50, the and East Anglia tailing closely behind with a figure of +48. Workload forecasts from practices of all sizes are optimistically reporting positive balance figures.

Jane Duncan Elected as the next President of the RIBA

Courtesy of Jane Duncan

Jane Duncan, an Architect based in the English county of Buckinghamshire, has been elected as the 76th President of the Royal Institute of British Architects (). Taking over the reigns from current President Stephen Hodder in September 2015, Duncan will become only the third female President after beating fellow candidate Oliver Richards (by a majority of 52% of the vote) to the institute’s highest position. According to the Architects’ Journal, only 16.7% of RIBA members voted in the election.

Critical Round-Up: The 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist

Though O’Donnell + Tuomey’s Building for the LSE is not the bookie’s favourite, many critics feel it is most deserving of the Stirling Prize. Image © Dennis Gilbert

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has now announced the six projects that form this year’s Stirling Prize Shortlist, the award that is the ultimate prize for any British building. As the ’s most publicly prominent award, the Stirling Prize is often a prime demonstration of the tension between architecture that is widely appreciated by the general populace, and that which is lauded by architectural critics and practitioners.

This year is no exception, with perhaps the country’s highest-profile project in years – the Shard - just part of the controversy. What did the critics make of the RIBA’s selection? Find out after the break.

RIBA Announces 2014 Stirling Prize Shortlist

The RIBA has announced the six projects that will compete for the 2014 Stirling Prize, the award for the building that has made the greatest contribution to British architecture in the past year. The six nominees will now be judged head to head for British architecture’s highest honour, based on “their design excellence and their significance in the evolution of architecture and the built environment,” with a winner announced on October 16th. See the full shortlist after the break.

RIBA Report Aims to Put Architecture at the Heart of Next Government’s Agenda

One proposal made by the report is to funnel transport money into ‘active transport’ routes, such as the Hackney Greenway which was created as part of the Olympic Legacy. Image © Flickr CC User Andy Wilkes

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has published a report which it hopes will influence government policy writers in time for the general election next year. The report outlines the ’s stance on a wide variety of architectural issues, from planning policy, to school building, to designing healthy cities.

The report hopes to build on the recommendations made by the Farrell Review, which among many other things recommended the appointment of a chief architect to advise the government, as well as an overhaul of the current planning system. However, in one sense the RIBA report goes further than the Farrell Report by saying that the government should implement a defined architecture policy, pointing to the success of such policies in countries such as Denmark.

Read on after the break for more on the report’s recommendations

Leading Architects Come Together for London’s Summer Exhibition

The Architecture Room. Image Courtesy of Royal Academy of Arts

The Royal Academy of Arts’ annual Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission exhibition providing “a unique platform for emerging and established artists to showcase their works to an international audience.” From 12,000 total works of art, spanning a complete range of disciplines, 140 architectural works have been selected and hung by Royal Academician and Architect Eric Parry, after some early dialogue with former RIBA President Sir Richard MacCormac. Work featured this year includes a model by Thomas Heatherwick and prints by Louisa Hutton of Sauerbruch Hutton, alongside Norman Foster, Zaha Hadid, Nicholas Grimshaw, Richard Rogers and Eva Jiřičná.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Demonstrates Continued Stability

Courtesy of RIBA

The results of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBAFuture Trends Survey for May show that the Workload Index among practices was slightly down in comparison to April (from +35 to +33) with the recovery in confidence levels remaining consistently “very strong” across the country. Although last month’s survey showed London as the region with the brightest outlook, confidence levels reported by architects in Wales and the West topped the index with a balance figure of +49. Workload forecasts in the private sector, public sector and community sector have all significantly increased.

RIBA Drops Israel Motion, Sets Up Global Ethics Group in Response to Controversy

The original motion by was a response to architecture’s role in the occupation of Palestine. Image © Rianne Van Doevern via Flickr CC User The Advocacy Project

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has dropped their controversial proposal to ban the Israeli Association of United Architects (IAUA) from the umbrella organization the International Union of Architects (UIA). Intended as a sanction against the IAUA for failing to “resist projects on illegally-occupied land,” supporters of the proposal had hoped it would be discussed at the UIA World Congress in Durban in August, however the has confirmed that it will not include the motion as it is beyond their ‘political scope’.

In response to the highly controversial episode – which garnered criticism both in the UK and as far afield as the United States - the RIBA has announced a new working group that will “consider the institute’s role in engaging with communities facing civil conflict and natural disaster.”

More on the decision by the UIA and the new RIBA Ethics Group after the break

RIBA Announces 2014 National Award Winners

King’s Cross Station / John McAslan + Partners. Image © Hufton+Crow

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the 44 buildings in the UK and 12 EU projects to win 2014 RIBA National Awards. The list includes instantly recognizable projects such as The Shard by Renzo Piano and Mecanoo‘s Library of Birmingham, but also rewards plenty of well-crafted smaller projects, for example Lens House by Alison Brooks Architects.

From this list of National winners, the RIBA will select the shortlist for the RIBA Stirling Prize, which will be revealed next month. See the full list of winners after the break.

UK Architecture Unemployment Falls to Pre-Crash Levels

© Rene de Wit

The number of unemployed architects in the UK has fallen to its lowest level since before the financial crisis, according to the Office of National Statistics. This is based on the number of architects claiming Jobseekers’ Allowance, which fell to just 310 in May, a figure that has almost halved since May 2013 when 615 architects were claiming.

These statistics are backed up by observations revealed by the RIBA Future Trends Survey for May, released later this month, which reportedly shows a 10% increase in workload among UK practices.

More on the recovery of UK architecture after the break

RIBA Stirling Prize To Be Renamed As It Regains Cash Prize

2013 Stirling Prize Winner: Astley Castle / . Image © Helene Binet

The annual RIBA Stirling Prize is set to regain its £20,000 cash prize following a year of no prize money in which Witherford Watson Mann scooped the accolade for Astley Castle. Considered to be the UK’s most prestigious architecture award, the Stirling Prize is presented annually to the “building that has made the greatest contribution to the evolution of architecture in the past year”. Brockton Capital have agreed to support the prize for the next three years starting from 2015, after which the prize will be known as the RIBA Brockton Stirling Prize. The lack of prize money in 2013 raised questions about the significance of the award.

“Live Work Play”: An Exhibition of Local Award Winning Architecture from South England

Courtesy of Live Work Play

Live Work Play, an organised as part of the Hampshire Festival of Architecture 2014 (), showcases over 100 projects from “within the country, the , and beyond.” Featuring a range of “thoughtful, robust, elegant and ingenious designs”, the show will include designs from local practices such as PAD Studio, Design Engine, AR Design Studio, Design ACB and John Pardey Architects. The exhibition will be open seven days a week between the 14th June and the 16th July. Find out more from RIBA Hampshire.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Shows Confidence Remains High

Courtesy of

The results of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Future Trends Survey for April show that confidence among UK practices remains high at a Workload Index of +35, the same as in March. The positive figures came from across the board, with practices of all sizes and from all regions of the predicting increased workloads in the near future. However, after last months’ survey showed Scotland as the region with the brightest outlook, the balance of power has shifted back to London, where architects reported the highest index of +45.

Has Prince Charles “Shut Down Debate” on UK Architecture?

The extension to the National Gallery by Venturi Scott Brown replaced the design by ABK which was scrapped after Prince Charles’ criticisms. Image © Nick Weall via e-architect

To mark the 30th anniversary of Prince Charles‘ famous “Carbuncle Speech”, last week the RIBA held a discussion focusing on the speech’s impact on British architecture. The speech in which the prince protested the design of a proposed extension to the National Gallery has been seen by some as expanding the debate around architectural quality, but the panelists on the night disagreed with this view: Owen Hatherley said “The idea he broadened the debate is curious. He shut it down.” Similarly, Charlie Luxton commented “He turned the debate from one of quality to one of style – and architecture suffered.” You can read more of the panelists’ views on BD Online.

AIANY Denounces RIBA’s Israel Motion

The motion by is a response to architecture’s role in the occupation of Palestine. Image © Rianne Van Doevern via Flickr CC User The Advocacy Project

The New York chapter of the AIA has officially voiced its objection to a proposal by the RIBA to suspend the Israeli Association of United Architects (IAUA) from the International Union of Architects (UIA). A letter drafted by AIANY President Lance Jay Brown and Chief Executive Rick Bell, and unanimously approved by AIANY’s board of directors, states that “the ’s stated goal is to unite the architects of the world without any form of discrimination”, and refers to the proposal to suspend the IAUA as “directly antithetical to the purpose of the much appreciated umbrella organization”.

The original proposal by the RIBA, adopted on March 19th, condemns the IAUA for its failure to “resist projects on illegally-occupied land” in the West Bank and Gaza, and calls on the UIA to suspend the body until it “acts to resist these illegal projects, and observes international law, and the UIA Accords and Resolution 13.”

Read on for more on the controversial backstory to the RIBA’s motion

RIBA Regional Awards Spotlight Best of Southern UK

Mary Rose Museum / Wilkinson Eyre Architects. Image © Hufton+Crow

The winners of RIBA Regional Awards have been announced for the South, South East and South West regions. Among the were further successes for Wilkinson Eyre‘s Mary Rose Museum, and Adam Richards Architects‘ Ditchling Museum of Art and Craft, both of which were also recently featured on the UK Museum of the Year Shortlist

The award winning projects will join winners from other regions to be considered for the 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize.

Read on after the break for all the winners from the three regions

2014 RIBA London Awards

© Hufton+Crow

The winners of the 2014 RIBA London Awards were announced in a ceremony last night. The awards recognize the RIBA London Architect of the year and 2014 RIBA Emerging Architect of the Year (Haworth Tompkins and RCKa, respectively) as well as a host of project awards which join other regional awards to make up the longlist for the 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize.

Among the winners are Zaha Hadid‘s Aquatics Centre, which becomes the final Olympics project to shoot for the Stirling Prize now that its seating wings have been removed; the Shard; the renovation of the Tate Britain by Caruso St John; and the transformation of King’s Cross by John McAslan + Partners. Read on after the break for a full list of winners.