Japanese and Chilean Architects Collaborate to Design Houses for the Ochoalcubo Project

Ochoalcubo (Eight-Cubed) is a pioneering project in Chile that seeks to unite leading Chilean and Japanese practices with ground-breaking architecture. The collaborative enterprise was started by Eduardo Godoy, a design impresario who began working in Chile in the 1980s and who has always been a strong advocate for innovative design and architecture in the country. For a nation that boasts more than forty individual schools of architecture, the ever growing number of professionals seems to have had a relatively small impact on Chilean cities. Faced with the seemingly infinite landscape of ‘cookie-cutter housing’ in the suburbs, Godoy implemented Ochoalcubo in order to provide opportunities for young professionals, alongside fostering a new kind of appreciation for the profession itself. With a large number of architects having taken part in the first stage, including Smiljan Radic (designer of the 2014 Serpentine Pavilion), the third and fourth stage of what is certainly one of the world’s largest active architectural laboratories will be launched in the coming days.

See images from all sixteen proposals from third and fourth stages of the Ochoalcubo project, including those by SANAASou FujimotoKengo KumaAlejandro Aravena and Atelier Bow Wow, after the break.

City As A Vision: Tribute to Michel Ragon

Architects Souk Mirage, 2013 © Architects. Image Courtesy of FRAC Centre

Architects have always questioned what the cities of the future will look like. In the 1960s and 70s, one of the most prominent advocates of this field of “futurology” within architecture was historian and critic Michel Ragon. In an upcoming exhibition entitled City As A Vision, the FRAC Centre pays tribute to Ragon by presenting both historical and prospective urban concepts by architects throughout the last fifty years.

New Images Released of Krumbach, Austria’s Famous Bus Stops

© Hufton + Crow

What happens when seven internationally acclaimed architects are invited to design sculptural bus stops for a tiny Austrian village of 1000 inhabitants? Collaborating with local architects and utilizing local materials to design the pavilions, Alexander Brodsky, Rintala Eggertsson, Ensamble Studio, Architecten de Vylder Vinck Taillieu, Smiljan Radic, Sou Fujimoto, and Wang Shu’s Amateur Architecture Studio worked with Austria’s Verein Kultur Krumbach to carry out the BUS:STOP project and usher in a unique new facet of culture to Krumbach. We brought you images of the design proposals earlier, and now we have photos of the incredible results: Hufton + Crow has just released a stunning new set of images showcasing the completed bus stops.

Hufton + Crow’s brilliant photography captures the inimitable originality and sensational quality of the uniquely crafted pavilions embedded within the Austrian landscape. Immerse yourself in Krumbach and check out the latest images after the break.

BUS:STOP Unveils 7 Unusual Bus Shelters by World Class Architects

Sou Fujimoto’s BUS:STOP design. Image © Yuri Palmin

A year in the making, Krumbach in Austria has unveiled seven eye-catching bus shelters which have turned the world’s gaze on the tiny village. Designed by internationally renowned architects such as Wang Shu, Sou Fujimoto and Smiljan Radic, who worked in collaboration with local architects and craftsmen, the whimsical structures will put the village of 1000 residents on the map.

Curator Dietmar Steiner praised the commitment of those involved, saying “the entire project succeeded because it was supported in the most generous fashion by more than 200 people.” This included the architects, who took up their projects for little more than a free holiday in the area and the chance to engage in an unusual challenge. However, BUS:STOP was not merely a vanity project: Verena Konrad, Director of vai Vorarlberger Architektur Institut, noted that the project was important for “the successful connection of infrastructure and mobility for the rural area.”

See images of all 7 shelters after the break

Solo Houses: When Architects Are Given Carte Blanche

Casa Fujimoto / Sou Fujimoto. Image © by-encore.com, via

French developer Christian Bourdais has enlisted eight architects to develop vacation homes on a 50-hectare nature reserve about two hours south of Barcelona. So far, so normal. However, each participant in the “Solo Houses” experiment was given what every architect dreams of (and hardly ever receives): carte blanche. The results, from the likes of Sou Fujimoto, Pezo von Ellrichshausen, and more, are stunning. See them all after the break…

Zaha Hadid’s 2020 Olympic Stadium to Be “Scaled Down”

© ZHA

UPDATE: The Washington Post reports that Japan’s minister of education, Hakubun Shimomura, has announced a plan to trim the budget proposed for the Olympic stadium (now expected to cost $3 billion) designed by . While he did not reveal the details of the scale-down, he maintained that the “design concept will be kept.” 

Pritzker Prize laureate Fumihiko Maki has rallied together a number of Japanese architects – including Sou Fujimoto, Toyo Ito and Kengo Kuma – to oppose the massive scale of Zaha Hadid’s competition-winning National Stadium. Planned to be ’s main venue for the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic games, Hadid’s 290,000 square meter stadium is accused of being “too big and too artificial” for the surrounding context. 

Sou Fujimoto Designs “Structural Waterfall” for Miami

Courtesy of

The Miami Design District, an 18 square-block neighborhood between Miami’s downtown and South Beach, has announced that the facade of its new mixed-use retail building will be designed by Sou Fujimoto. The two-floor, 17,000 square foot structure, which will feature “an elongated series of glass fins extending from the rooftop down to the open courtyard,” will create unique pedestrian arcades covered by a “structural waterfall.”

The Miami Design District, owned by Miami Design District Associates, aims to combine commerce with high-quality design, fashion, art and architecture, and has chosen Fujimoto on the merit of his past award-winning works, from House N in Tokyo, to the Musashino Art University & Library, to – most recently – his design of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London.

Sou Fujimoto Designs New Wing for Germany’s Kunsthalle Bielefeld

First Proposal: Stacked Landscape. Image © Architects

Sou Fujimoto has unveiled three design proposals for an extension to Philip Johnson’s Kunsthalle Bielefeld in Germany. Since its completion in 1968, the museum has built a reputation for hosting temporary exhibitions. However, with the construction of the new wing, Kunsthalle Bielefeld will expand their services to accommodate a contemporary art gallery.

Read on to review Sou Fujimoto’s three proposals…

How Engineering the Serpentine Almost Brought AECOM’s Computers to a Halt

©

AECOM has published an article detailing the way they helped engineer this year’s Serpentive Pavilion. “A typical building might have between 1-2,000 such steel supports, and it’s estimated that the Eiffel Tower has just over 18,000 steel struts, but the Serpentine’s new pavilion has over 26,000 – each one working hard to lend form and strength…The level of detail nearly brought ’s computer systems to a halt. In fact a system upgrade was required to manage the information.” On ’s website you can read more about the challenges of lighting and fireproofing Fujimoto’s complicated structure.

Sou Fujimoto Awarded Marcus Prize

2013 Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto © Iwan Baan

As the youngest architect ever to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London, it is no surprise that 41-year-old Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto has been selected as winner of the $100,000 Marcus Prize. Awarded by the Milwaukee-based Marcus Corporation Foundation, the biennial prize is dedicated to honoring emerging designers by requiring only a decade of exceptional leadership in their field.

This award doesn’t come with responsibility, as Fujimoto will be required to visit the graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture and Urban Planning a handful of times through the next year, in addition to skyping with a class as often as once per week.

BUS:STOP Krumbach: 7 Architects, 7 Buildings, 7 Statements

© Adolf Bereuter

BUS:STOP Krumbach is a recently initiated project in the Bregenzerwald region of Austria that will pair seven well-known architecture offices from around the world with seven local architects and allow them to work together on the design of seven new bus shelters in the town of Krumbach. A true collaboration between tradition and innovation, national and international, BUS:STOP hopes to create a series of small and functional buildings with their own unique characters that tell not only the story of these architects, but also of this special region.

For the list of participating offices and to learn more about BUS:STOP, read on. 

Sou Fujimoto’s Serpentine Pavilion Through the Lens of James Aiken

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Dazzling viewers with its “tron-like landscape of infinite white,” as described by Guardian critic Oliver Wainwright, ’s Serpentine Pavilion in Hyde Park is arguably “one of the most radical pavilions to date.” The 350 square-meter latticed structure melts into its surrounding by fusing together the man-made and natural world, creating a lush, semi-transparent terrain in which transforms into a variety of seating, steps and side tables that complement its interior coffee bar (view more images here).

This video was provided by film maker James Aiken, in collaboration with The Serpentine Gallery, and commissioned by COS.

2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto, Photos by Danica Kus

© Danica Kus

Featured here are photos of Sou Fujimoto‘s 2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion taken by Danica Kus. Capturing the semi-transparent, multi-purpose social space situated in , this delicate, three-dimensional structure is enjoyed by its visitors, creating an inviting social setting.

Fujimoto, the youngest architect to accept the ’s invitation at 41, describes his work as, “…a transparent terrain that encourages people to interact with and explore the site in diverse ways. Within the pastoral context of Kensington Gardens, I envisage the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life woven together with a constructed geometry. A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and the man-made merge; not solely architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two.” More images by Danica Kus after the break.

Fujimoto’s Serpentine Pavilion Receives High Praise from Critics

© Daniel Portilla

With the opening of his cloud-like gridded structure in Hyde Park last week, Sou Fujimoto became the youngest architect in the pantheon of Serpentine Gallery Pavilion designers. The pavilion is an annual commission for a temporary structure, always given to a well known architect who is yet to build in the UK. In previous years the commission has been awarded to Herzog & de Meuron with Ai Weiwei (2012), Peter Zumthor (2011), Jean Nouvel (2010), SANAA (2009), stretching back to the original pavilion designed by in 2000.

With such a prolific history of star designers over the past 13 years, Fujimoto’s ethereal design has a lot to live up to. But despite these high expectations, architecture critics have been gushing over the new design. See a full round-up of opinions after the break…

Serpentine Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto

© Daniel Portilla

This Thursday, the official opening of the Serpentine Pavilion, by Sou Fujimoto, took place in Hyde Park, . It was the first time the public could interact with the structure.

The pavilion, which has already gotten the “cloud” nickname because of its shape and lightness, is generated through a three-dimensional steel grid of about 40 centimetre modules which morphs on each side. The structure is broken to allow people access as well as to generate different uses around, below and upon it.

More pictures and the architect’s statement after the break.

2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto

© Iwan Baan

Sou Fujimoto’s 2013 Serpentine Pavilion, now complete and standing on the front lawn of London’s Serpentine Gallery, has opened to the press and we are now able to see Iwan Baan’s photographs of the temporary pavilion. Fujimoto will be lecturing to a sold out crowd this coming Saturday (June 8th) when the pavilion opens to the general public. The semi-transparent, multi-purpose social space will be on view until October 20th.

Fujimoto (age 41) is the youngest architect to accept the Serpentine Gallery’s invitation, joining the ranks of Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012)Peter Zumthor (2011)Jean Nouvel (2010)SANAA (2009)and more. He described his Serpentine project as “…an architectural landscape: a transparent terrain that encourages people to interact with and explore the site in diverse ways. Within the pastoral context of Kensington Gardens, I envisage the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life woven together with a constructed geometry. A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and the man-made merge; not solely architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two.”

The Guardian has posted both print and video reviews by Oliver Wainwright.

More images by Iwan Baan after the break. See also In Progress: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto.

Video: Sou Fujimoto at IE Master in Architectural Design

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IE Master in Architectural Design opens its 2013 lecture series program, at the Círculo of Bellas Artes in Madrid, with the Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto.

Sou Fujimoto’s lecture, “Evolving Ideas: Primitive Future”, served as a forum for students to participate in open discussions between scholars, critics, independent professionals, entrepreneurs, curators and cultural activists.

What is the meaning of Architecture? How does it relate to nature? These are the two questions that Sou Fujimoto continues to ponder on. His projects are a pure reflection of his continuous research of the relationship between: City and architecture, architecture and landscape, inside and outside, and nature and architecture.

Enjoy the interview with Sou Fujimoto and summary of the event.

The Fujimoto Experiment: Five Students, Five Days, One Model

© flickr – maxximuseo

Last week an online call was put out by Rome’s MAXXI museum promising the first five architecture students to respond a chance to travel to and build a model of Sou Fujimoto’s latest project. The five selected entrants started on their work at MAXXI on Monday and their experience is being broadcast over the course of this week in a series of photos and videos detailing the ups, downs, opinions and thoughts of the students as they work.

Read more about the model and exhibition after the break…