Amsterdam’s Glass Music Hall Faces Demolition, Seeks Home

Courtesy of Octatube

A mere twenty-five years after its inauguration, the Music Hall at the former Exchange of Berlage in Amsterdam is looking for a new home, where it will be relocated and reassembled for free. The innovative space, originally designed for the Dutch Chamber Music Orchestra, has garnered international attention and multiple awards, but sadly no longer meets the needs of the facility. 

Designed by architect Pieter Zaanen and structural designer Mick Eekhout, the Glass Music Hall sits in the center of an existing space, defying stereotypes about what glass can do. Being a hard material, the reverberation time in a blunt glass hall would be approximately 5 seconds. However, this number was brought down to 1 or 2 seconds in this instance, proving glass can be used to create a fantastical acoustical environment. 

How Safe Are Glass Skyscrapers Really?

The Willis Tower’s Glass Balcony. Image Courtesy of Jared Newman, DesignCrave.com

Imagine standing on a glass platform with Chicago 1300 feet directly below. Suddenly, the glass holding you begins to crack. This actually happened to Alejandro Garibay at the Willis Tower (formerly the Sears Tower) just last week. Luckily, Garibay wasn’t hurt, but the occurrence begs the question: how safe is glass - the most common material used in skyscrapers nowadays - really? Karrie Jacobs At Fast Company – Design, asked  experts to find out “The Truth Behind Building With Glass.”

Foster + Partners’ Unfinished Vegas Tower Approved for Demolition

Harmon Hotel via Wikimedia Commons

A court approved ruling has sealed the fate of Foster + Partners’ half-built Harmon Hotel in Las Vegas. Unfinished due to structural defects, the 27-story tower was once envisioned to be the staple of the $8.5 billion CityCenter entertainment complex. However, since problems arose in 2008, the stunted hotel and casino has instead served as a glorified billboard.

Though it has yet to be determined who will be blamed for the faulty construction, owner MGM Resorts International has been granted permission to dismantle the blue glass building floor-by-floor at a cost of $11.5 million.

Seaweed, Salt, Potatoes, & More: Seven Unusual Materials with Architectural Applications

The “Saltygloo” project is an igloo made of printed translucent modular salt panels. Image Courtesy of Matthew Millman

The following article is presented by ArchDaily Materials. In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine, Lara Kristin Herndon and Derrick Mead explore seven innovative architectural materials and the designers behind them. Some materials are byproducts, some will help buildings breathe and one is making the leap from to .

When Arthur C. Clarke said that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, he was speaking from the spectator’s point of view, not the magician’s. As our list of smart materials shows, technology solves difficult problems, but getting there requires more than just a wave of the magic wand. Each of the following projects looks past easy answers. Whether it’s a new way of looking at old problems, a new material that maximizes the efficiency of an old technique, or a new method to tap the potential of an abundant or underutilized resource, here are seven innovators who take technology out of the realm of science fiction.

Light Matters: Richard Kelly, The Unsung Master Behind Modern Architecture’s Greatest Buildings

Seagram Building, New York.

Richard Kelly illuminated some of the twentieth century’s most iconic buildings: the House, Seagram Building and Kimbell Art Museum, to name a few. His design strategy was surprisingly simple, but extremely successful.

Lighting for architecture has been and still often is dominated by an engineering viewpoint, resigned to determining sufficient illuminance levels for a safe and efficient working environment. With a background in stage lighting, Kelly introduced a scenographic perspective for architectural lighting. His point of view might look self-evident to today’s architectural community, but it was revolutionary for his time and has strongly influenced modern architecture.

Read more about Richard Kelly’s remarkable, and unsung, contribution to architecutre, after the break.

Material Inspiration: 10 Projects Inspired by Glass

To celebrate the launch of ArchDaily Materials, our new product catalog, we’ve rounded up 10 awesome projects from around the world that were inspired by one material: . Check out the projects after the break…

Light Matters: Glass Beyond Transparency with James Carpenter

7 World Trade Center. New York, NY 2003-2007. Image © David Sundberg

In Modernism’s attempt to dissolve spatial boundaries with transparency, the material used – glass – is all too often dematerialised. In contrast, the New York-based designer James Carpenter is interested in multiple readings of glass – beyond transparency.

As Carpenter explains: “People approach light in relationship to architecture. It is that the light is the means by which the architecture is revealed and the architecture is basically defined by the way the light enters the space. I tend to think actually from the opposite direction where the light itself is what informs the architecture. The architecture is in service of light rather than the other way around.”

More , after the break…

Apple Patents Glass Cylinder Design

Courtesy of Apple

Apple has successfully secured a patent for the cylindrical, glass entrance to its Shanghai store. After trademarking the design and layout of its retail stores last January, this is one more battle Apple has won for copyrighting its signature look.

More on the patented design after the break.

“A Short History of the Highrise”

Oscar Niemeyer – Brasília, 1958. Image © Marcel Gautherot/IMS

The Times has published “A Short History of the Highrise” – an interactive documentary that explores the 2,500-year global history of vertical living and issues of social equality in an increasingly urbanized world. Organized in four short films – “Mud,” “Concrete,” “,” and “Home” – viewers are given the option to “dig deeper” into each subject and explore additional archival material while viewing the film. Check out the film here.

100 years under the Dome : 1912-2012

Festival de la mode, David Lachapelle, 1999 © Archives Galeries Lafayette

Beginning on October 16th, 2012, Galeries Lafayette in Paris, , will be celebrating the 100 year anniversary of the Dome designed by architect Ferdinand Chanut and glass artist Jacques Gruber in 1912.  100 years under the Dome will be held at the flagship store of the boulevard Haussmann, a true Parisian symbol.  In addition, the gallery will launch an exhibition called 1912-2012. Chronicles of a Creative Itinerary by architect Rem Koolhaas and his studio , along with a collaboration called Chrysalide between visual artist Yann Kersalé and Djuric Tardio – Architectes.

Join us after the break for more stunning images for the anticipated celebration.

Mediatheek Delft / Dok Architecten

Courtesy of ; © Arjen Schmitz

Architecture Firm: Dok Architekten
Architect: Liesbeth van der Pol
Location:  centrum-Delft-Vesteplein 100-2611 WG Delft,
Design Team: P. Cannon, M. Hardonk, R. Bos, A. Koch, A. Derksen
Client: Gemeente Delft 
Photographer: Arjen Schmitz 

   

MyZeil Shopping Mall / Studio Fuksas

© Karsten Monnerjahn

Architects: Studio Fuksas - Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas
Interior Design: Fuksas Design
Location: Frankfurt,
Address: Grosse Eschenheimer Strasse 10-14
Period: 2002-2009 
Client: PalaisQuartier GmBH & CO., KG
Surface:  Built Surface – 77,000 sq.m., Facade – 8,500 sq.m., Cover – 13,000 sq.m.
Engineering:  Structures – Knippers-Helbig Beratende Ingenieure, Stuttgart; Krebs und Kiefer Beratende Ingenieure für das Bauwesen GmbH, Darmstadt | Realization of the façade and covering – Waagner Biro Stahlbau AG, Wien

   

Carlo Scarpa. Venini 1932–1947 at Rooms for Glass / Selldorf Architects

Corroded, 1973 by Carlo Scarpa | via

The new exhibition space Rooms for Glass (Le Stanze del Vetro) in Italy, designed by Selldorf Architects, will open this summer in August 2012.  The first exhibit to inaugurate the space will be Carlo Scarpa. Venini 1932–1947, a collection of over 300 glassworks by architect Carlo Scarpa. The exhibit will run until November 29, 2012, after which Rooms for  will continue showcasing the art of Venetian glassmaking in the 20th century with other exhibits.

Read on for more after the break.

Bright Future / Pratt Manhattan Gallery

Courtesy of Aron Losonczi

Pratt Manhattan Gallery has unveiled their exhibition “Bright Future: New Designs in featuring innovative and mesmerizing uses for the centuries-old material.  The exhibit, which features furniture, tableware, architectural elements and lighting designs, will be on display until May 5th, 2012.  The artists and firms featured here displays a refined use of glass in conjunction with metal, and pigment to evoke its qualities of flexibility and transparency.  In conjunction with this exhibit, Pratt will be hosting a free panel discussion: “Glass, Light and Public Space” on April 5th at 6pm in Lecture Hall 213 of Pratt’s Manhattan Campus at 144 West 14th Street, Second Floor.

Read on after the break to see previews of the exhibit and for more on the panel discussion.

AD Classics: Wall House 2 / John Hejduk

© Liao Yusheng

With a history unlike any other, Wall House 2 redefines the limits of architectural design as a function of context in both time and culture. 28 years after the completion of the initial designs and one year after the death of architect , construction began in a completely different environment than where it was initially imagined.

The house is a study of the relationship between inside and outside and is reminiscent of Corbusian architecture, although a bit more eccentric.

More on the history of Wall House 2 after the break.

Video: Glassworks / Krueck + Sexton

Ron Krueck, Mark Sexton and Tom Jacobs of Krueck + Sexton Architects speak about their relationship to, and explorations with, through the lens of three innovative projects: the Transparent House, the Crown Fountain in Millennium Park and the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies in .

Video Art: Spirit of Space

Indiana Convention Center Expansion / RATIO Architects

© Bill Zbaren Photography

Architect: RATIO Architects
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana,
Project Area: 700,000 sq ft
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Bill Zbaren Photography

In 2006, the Indiana Stadium and Convention Building Authority selected RATIO Architects to create a major expansion to the Indiana Convention Center as a response to ongoing increased convention and trade show demand. The more than 700,000 sq. ft. expansion includes exhibition space, meeting rooms, and pre-function and support space – all within a tight urban site in the heart of Indianapolis, directly connected to 4,700 hotel rooms and within easy walking distance of restaurants, retail shops and at the head of a new pedestrian/event street. More about the Indiana Stadium and Convention Building after the break.

On the Corner / Eastern Design Office

© Koichi Torimura

Architects: Eastern Design Office
Location: ,
Client: TOYO-KAIHATSU Co., ltd
Constructor: Okudakomuten Co., Ltd
Structure Planning: HOJO STRUCTURE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 261 sqm
Photographs: Koichi Torimura