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Reinier de Graaf Discusses Moscow's Development and the "Major Stupidity" of Brexit

09:30 - 16 July, 2016

At the recently concluded Moscow Urban Forum, Renier de Graaf shared his opinion on a range of topics, from UK’s Brexit and the EU identity to OMA’s work in Russia, particularly in shaping the recent growth of Moscow. De Graaf is a partner at OMA and as director of the firm’s Think Tank, AMO, he produced The Image of Europe, an exhibition hoping to portray a “bold, explicit and popular” European Union. Thus, it comes as no surprise that De Graaf, along with Rem Koolhaas, is particularly outspoken about the recent events within the European Union.

Ulterior Motives: OMA/AMO's Reinier de Graaf on "Research," Europe and the 2014 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 21 June, 2016
Ulterior Motives: OMA/AMO's Reinier de Graaf on "Research," Europe and the 2014 Venice Biennale, Installation in the Central Pavilion of the Giardini at the 2014 Venice Biennale, directed by OMA/AMO. Image Courtesy of OMA
Installation in the Central Pavilion of the Giardini at the 2014 Venice Biennale, directed by OMA/AMO. Image Courtesy of OMA

The following interview with Reinier De Graaf was first published by Volume Magazine in their 48th issue, The Research Turn. You can read the Editorial of this issue, Research Horizonshere.

Architectural practice requires a degree of intimacy and insight into complex sets of forces. While building is architecture’s bread and butter, it’s not always the best format to make a statement. It’s sometimes not even the most appropriate language to respond to a brief. Volume spoke with Reinier de Graaf of OMA/AMO about how research and media can become a vessel for political agendas.

AMO's Stratified Scenography for Prada's 2017 S/S Collection is Presented as "Total Space"

12:30 - 20 June, 2016
AMO's Stratified Scenography for Prada's 2017 S/S Collection is Presented as "Total Space", © Agostino Osio
© Agostino Osio

In the latest scenographic set for Prada's fashion collections, AMO have created a set "conceived as a stratification of architectures" – Total Space. Remnants from previous shows sit around the periphery of the room creating a foundation and aesthetic background for the house's 2017 Spring/Summer collection. A linear structure, which sits centrally and divides the room, is designed to "amplify its perceived proportions."

© Agostino Osio © Agostino Osio © Agostino Osio © Alberto Moncada +9

"There is Much More at Stake Than Simply Being In or Out" – Rem Koolhaas Speaks Out Over a Potential EU 'Brexit'

13:15 - 17 June, 2016
"There is Much More at Stake Than Simply Being In or Out" – Rem Koolhaas Speaks Out Over a Potential EU 'Brexit', EU Barcode (OMA*AMO). Image © flickr user eager. Licensed under CC BY 2.0.
EU Barcode (OMA*AMO). Image © flickr user eager. Licensed under CC BY 2.0.

In a recent interview with the BBCRem Koolhaas (OMA) has spoken out against the campaign seeking to remove the United Kingdom from the European Union, upon which the British people will vote in a referendum next week. Reflecting on his time spent at London's Architectural Association (AA) in the 1960s and '70s, Koolhaas fears that advocates for withdrawal may be looking at the past through rose-colored glasses.

If you look at the arguments to leave you can see this is a movement of people who want to fundamentally change England back into the way it supposedly was before.

Panel Discussion: Presentation Night ‘With the Masses’

14:30 - 12 April, 2016
Panel Discussion: Presentation Night ‘With the Masses’, Credit: Astrid Nieuwborg
Credit: Astrid Nieuwborg

Five acclaimed international guests join OMA/AMO's Reinier de Graaf and the students of the Berlage Theory Master Class for a final debate on With the Masses - Architecture and Participation this Friday Night. Expect new insights into Het Nieuwe Insituut's collection and new formats for vigorous debate designed by the students. With a.o. Françoise Fromonot, architecture critic and educator, Ricardo E. Bofill, architect, and Lucien Kroll, Atelier Kroll.

Introducing Volume #47: The System*

04:00 - 24 March, 2016
Introducing Volume #47: The System*, Volume #47: The System*. Image © Volume
Volume #47: The System*. Image © Volume

Volume is an "agenda-setting" quarterly magazine, published by the Archis Foundation (The Netherlands). Founded in 2005 as a research mechanism by Ole Bouman (Archis), Rem Koolhaas (OMA*AMO), and Mark Wigley (Columbia University Laboratory for Architecture/C-Lab), the project "reaches out for global views on designing environments, advocates broader attitudes to social structures, and reclaims the cultural and political significance of architecture."

Over the next six weeks Volume will share a curated selection of essays from The System* on ArchDaily. This represents the start of a new partnership between two platforms with global agendas: in the case of ArchDaily to provide inspiration, knowledge and tools to architects across the world and, in the case of Volume, "to voice architecture any way, anywhere, anytime [by] represent[ing] the expansion of architectural territories and the new mandate for design."

AMO Brings Prada's 2016 S/S Collection to Life with "Real Fantasies" Video

16:00 - 4 February, 2016

AMO has released the 16th edition of Prada Real Fantasies - a conceptual reinterpretation of the 2016 Spring/Summer Prada collection.

"AMO graphically reinterprets the Indefinite Hangar as a synthetic sunset fixed within a 3 dimensional blank space. The abstract hangar is populated with geometric objects and furniture. Characters move through a neutral scene between the undefined and distilled fragments of daily life. The horizon and scale constantly shifts, manipulating the frame and disrupting a linear sequence: an artificial landscape where fiction and collection collide," says the OMA research studio.  

OMA/AMO's Latest Prada Runway is Inspired by 17th Century Auto-Da-Fé Trials

16:00 - 18 January, 2016
OMA/AMO's Latest Prada Runway is Inspired by 17th Century Auto-Da-Fé Trials, © OMA. Photographed by Agostino Osio
© OMA. Photographed by Agostino Osio

When it comes to the modern-day fashion show, the internet has fundamentally changed the way audiences interact with models and designers, say OMA/AMO, arguing: "The assemblage of recorded impressions and digital reactions inserts itself into the once autonomous narrative of the fashion show. The statement of the collective spreads. The mass of fragmented instant data is uploaded and critiqued by a multitude of voices."

With their latest fashion show design for Prada, which was used to showcase the designer's upcoming fall/winter menswear collection in Milan yesterday, the firm sought to enhance this sense of public judgement. "This consumption of images is like a public trial, a contemporary transposition of the Auto-da-fé," explains their press release, referring to the ceremonies of public penance which took place in the Portuguese and Spanish Inquisitions in the 15th-17th centuries.

© OMA. Photographed by Agostino Osio © OMA. Photographed by Alberto Moncada © OMA. Photographed by Agostino Osio © OMA. Photographed by Agostino Osio +7

'What is The Netherlands?' Exploring the World Expo at Rotterdam's Nieuwe Instituut

04:00 - 20 July, 2015
'What is The Netherlands?' Exploring the World Expo at Rotterdam's Nieuwe Instituut, Based on a circular framework inspired by Frédéric Le Play's design for the 1867 WE in Paris in which the 14 historic Dutch World fair entries are 'equal'. Image © Peter Tijhuis
Based on a circular framework inspired by Frédéric Le Play's design for the 1867 WE in Paris in which the 14 historic Dutch World fair entries are 'equal'. Image © Peter Tijhuis

Now at the halfway point of the six month long World Expo in Milan, in which 145 countries are participating in a concentration of national spectacle surrounding the theme of "feeding the planet," Rotterdam's Nieuwe Instituut (HNI)—the centre for architecture in the Netherlands—is exhibiting an altogether more reflective display of national civic pride.

Rotterdam, which was blitzed and decimated during the Second World War, is a place well suited to host an exhibition whose underlying theme centres on the fragile, often precarious notion of national self-image. Following the war Rotterdam was forced to rebuild itself, carving out a new place on the world stage and reestablishing its importance as an international port. Now, seventy years later, Rotterdam is a very different place. In demonstrating just how delicate the construction of a tangible national identity can be this latest exhibition at the HNI offers up a sincere speculative base for self-reflection.

A chronology of chairs presents a brief history of Dutch seating at the World's Fair. Image © Peter Tijhuis Diagrammatic model by AMO of the 1970 Osaka pavilion by Carel Weeber and Jaap Bakema. Image © AMO Where the inner ring focuses on a dialectic between governance and lyricism, the second ring presents a selection of artefacts from the respective pavilions. Image © Mimmink The second (outer) ring features emblematic found objects  of Dutch innovation at the World's Fair. Image © Peter Tijhuis +10

AMO Designs Paris Pop-Up Club

08:00 - 8 July, 2015
AMO Designs Paris Pop-Up Club , ©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA
© Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA

On Saturday, July 4, designer Prada and AMO—a research studio subset of OMA architecture—hosted The Miu Miu Club, a pop-up event, featuring dinner, a fashion show, and several musical performances in Paris, France.

Inside of the 1937 art deco Palais d-Iena, Paris’ current CESE government offices, the one-night event was held in the Hypostyle, using a scaffolding ring to create a “room within a room.” Strip lighting, metal grids, PVC sheets, and arrangements of luxurious furniture were also used to enhance the space. 

©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA ©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA © Alberto Moncada, Courtesy of OMA ©  Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA +11

Rem Koolhaas On Preservation, The Fondazione Prada, And Tearing Down Part Of Paris

16:00 - 24 May, 2015
Rem Koolhaas On Preservation, The Fondazione Prada, And Tearing Down Part Of Paris, © Bas Princen – Fondazione Prada
© Bas Princen – Fondazione Prada

With the opening of their Fondazione Prada building in Milan at the start of this month, OMA got the chance to show off a skill that they don't get the chance to use very often: preservation. In this interview with Kultur Spiegel, Rem Koolhaas talks at length on the topic, explaining that he believes "we have to preserve history," not just architecture, and arguing that the rise in popularity of reusing old buildings comes from a shift toward comfort, security and sustainability over the ideals of liberty, equality and fraternity. "The dimensions and repertoire of what is worthy of preserving have expanded dramatically," he says, meaning that "we shouldn't tear down buildings that are still usable." Still, he says, that doesn't mean we shouldn't tear down and start again in some cases - an entire Parisian district beyond La Défense, for example. Read the full interview here.

Reinier de Graaf on Cultural Amnesia and the "Fall" of the Berlin Wall

06:00 - 4 March, 2015
Reinier de Graaf on Cultural Amnesia and the "Fall" of the Berlin Wall, Throughout his article, de Graaf's argument is illustrated with images of lively scenes from 1980s East Berlin, challenging the common misconception that life on the other side of the Wall was bleak. Image © Lutz Schramm/Wikipedia
Throughout his article, de Graaf's argument is illustrated with images of lively scenes from 1980s East Berlin, challenging the common misconception that life on the other side of the Wall was bleak. Image © Lutz Schramm/Wikipedia

"Twenty-five years after the Berlin Wall’s demise, it is as though a large part of the twentieth century never happened," writes OMA principle Reinier de Graaf in his article for Metropolis Magazine "The Other Truth". "An entire period has been erased from public consciousness, almost like a blank frame in a film." Through the course of the article, de Graaf outlines how the West has rewritten the history of the cold war, erasing the "other truth" that existed for nearly half a century in East Berlin, the USSR, and other soviet-aligned states - a truth that we forget to our peril. It may not be immediately architectural, but the essay provides an interesting look into the political thoughts of de Graaf who, as the principle of one of architecture's most prominent research organizations in AMO, has an important influence on the profession's understanding of the wider world. Read the article in full here.

Video: The Construction of AMO's "Infinite Palace" for Prada in a 32-Second Timelapse

00:00 - 16 February, 2015

Last month, Prada introduced their latest Fall/Winter line not on a catwalk, but in an "Infinite Palace" of disorienting spaces designed by AMO. Continuing the partnership with OMA/AMO that has seen the creation of catwalks, 2009's Prada Transformer and even the soon-to-be-completed Foundazione Prada in Milan, the structure "simulates endless repetitions and symmetries," creating a unique fashion experience that "multiplies and fragments the show into a series of intimate moments."

In this video created and first published by Wallpaper* Magazine, the construction of this mysterious space is revealed, from the construction of the MDF framework and hidden lighting rigs, to the installation of the faux-marble furniture - all condensed to just over half a minute.

OMA Nears Completion of Fondazione Prada’s New Milan Venue

00:00 - 22 January, 2015
© OMA and Fondazione Prada
© OMA and Fondazione Prada

When first commissioned by Miuccia Prada and Patrizio Bertelli to design Fondazione Prada’s new space in Largo Asarco, OMA set out to “expand the repertoire of spatial typologies in which art can be exhibited and shared with the public.” The result, an “unusually diverse environment” staged within a historic 20th-century distillery south of Milan’s city center that goes beyond the traditional white museum box. 

Prada Launches FW2015 Menswear in OMA/AMO's "Infinite Palace"

00:00 - 20 January, 2015
Prada Launches FW2015 Menswear in OMA/AMO's "Infinite Palace" , © Agostino Osio; OMA and Prada
© Agostino Osio; OMA and Prada

On Sunday, Prada ditched the classic runway to kickoff their 2015 Fall/Winter menswear line in a “disorienting landscape” designed by OMA’s research counterpart AMO. The partitioned catwalk transformed an exiting room inside the Fondazione Prada at Via Fogazzaro 36 in Milan into an intimate series of interconnected spaces affectionately referred to as “The Infinite Palace.”

“The existing room is disguised into a classic enfilade of rooms, gradually changing proportions as in an abstract mannerist perspective. As opposed to a single stage, the new sequence of spaces multiplies and fragments the show into a series of intimate moments,” described AMO.

Reflections on the 2014 Venice Biennale

01:00 - 18 November, 2014
Reflections on the 2014 Venice Biennale, Fundamentals (Central Pavilion): Ceiling. Image © David Levene
Fundamentals (Central Pavilion): Ceiling. Image © David Levene

Fundamentals, the title of the 2014 Venice Biennale, will close its doors in a matter of days (on the 23rd November). From the moment Rem Koolhaas revealed the title for this year’s Biennale in January 2013, asking national curators to respond directly to the theme of ‘Absorbing Modernity 1914-2014’, there was an inkling that this Biennale would be in some way special. Having rejected offers to direct the Biennale in the past, the fact that Koolhaas chose to act not only as curator but also thematic co-ordinator of the complete international effort, was significant. This announcement led Peter Eisenman (one of Koolhaas' earliest tutors and advocates) to state in one interview that “[Rem is] stating his end: the end of [his] career, the end of [his] hegemony, the end of [his] mythology, the end of everything, the end of architecture.”

AMO Invites Dutch Architects to Discuss their Future at the Venice Biennale

00:00 - 10 October, 2014
AMO Invites Dutch Architects to Discuss their Future at the Venice Biennale, At this year's Dutch Pavilion in Venice, the curators explored the work of Jaap Bakema, arguing that after the demise of the welfare state "Bakema’s work once again provides us with a touchstone for rethinking the ideals of the open society". Image © Nico Saieh
At this year's Dutch Pavilion in Venice, the curators explored the work of Jaap Bakema, arguing that after the demise of the welfare state "Bakema’s work once again provides us with a touchstone for rethinking the ideals of the open society". Image © Nico Saieh

On November 20-21, AMO is hosting a discussion event at the Venice Biennale focusing on the past, present and future of Dutch architecture in which 30 young architects will be invited to present their agenda for architecture in the Netherlands for the next 10 years. Over the course of the two days, each participant will present will deliver a 7-minute presentation looking at architecture in 2024 to answer the question "where will you be and will you be doing?" Find out more about the event, and how you can be a part of it, after the break.

Reinier de Graaf: Mayors Should Not Rule The World

01:00 - 2 October, 2014
Reinier de Graaf: Mayors Should Not Rule The World, London City Hall, centre of operations for Mayor Boris Johnson. Image © Flickr CC User alh1
London City Hall, centre of operations for Mayor Boris Johnson. Image © Flickr CC User alh1

This weekend, the first planning session of the Global Parliament of Mayors took place in Amsterdam: a platform for mayors from across the world, triggered by Benjamin Barber’s book: If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities.

In this book the current political system and its leaders is dismissed as dysfunctional. Defined by borders and with an inevitable focus on national interests, they are not an effective vehicle to govern a world defined by interdependence. Mayors, presiding over cities with their more open, networked structure and cosmopolitan demographics, so the book argues, could do it better.

It is of no surprise that this book has been welcomed by the same political class as the one it praises: mayors. As was apparent during the first planning session of the GPM: a conference about mayors, for mayors, attended by mayors, moderated by mayors and hosted by a mayor, all triggered by a book about mayors.

I recognize many of the book’s observations. Many mayors are impressive figures and time appears to be on their side. Nation states (particularly the large ones) have an increasingly hard time and, in the context of a process of globalization, cities, and particularly small city-states, increasingly emerge victorious. Cities have first-hand experience with many of the things that occur in globalization’s wake, such as immigration and cultural and religious diversity, and are generally less dogmatic and more practical in dealing with them.

So far so good.