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Fernanda Canales: The Latest Architecture and News

Mexican Architects Present 'Designing Mexico. Architecture: Need and Freedom' in Italy

10:00 - 9 June, 2019
Mexican Architects Present 'Designing Mexico. Architecture: Need and Freedom' in Italy, © Giuseppe Gradella
© Giuseppe Gradella

© Giuseppe Gradella © Giuseppe Gradella © Giuseppe Gradella © Giuseppe Gradella + 11

The presence of Mexican architecture on the global scene is increasingly evident and strengthened by the ambassador architects who constantly represent Mexico in international events and exhibitions. Within these samples, you are able to see a constant concern to show contemporary values that denote a sense of responsibility, reinventing their own identity with the urgency of addressing current challenges.

16 Ephemeral Installations Designed by Mexican Architects

04:00 - 4 May, 2019

As we have seen throughout the history of architecture, ephemeral installations and pavilions are important tools for talking about specific moments in architecture in an almost immediate way. While it is true some pavilions have been so relevant that they broke with their ephemeral quality to become permanent, such as the German Pavilion in Barcelona, designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich, most are documented in photographs, plans and experiences to be rewritten in future projects.

Royal Academy Announces Shortlist of Emerging Architects for the Dorfman Award

10:00 - 9 February, 2019

The Royal Academy has revealed the shortlist for their annual prize recognizing young talent in architecture, the Dorfman Award. The award is given to those "...reimagining the future of architecture and whose work demonstrates a high degree of sensitivity to local and global context." The 2019 shortlist comprises four emerging architects practicing across the globe.

This year's shortlisted designers/practices are: Fernanda Canales (Mexico), Alice Casey and Cian Duggan of TAKA Architects (Ireland), Mariam Kamara of Atelier Masomi (Niger), and Boonserm Premthada of Bangkok Project Studio (Thailand.) The jury for this year's prize included chair Alan Stanton, Louisa Hutton, Phyllida Barlow, Kirsty Wark, Lesley Lokko, and Richard Burdett. The winner will be announced later this year.

30 Years After Luis Barragán: 30 Architects Share Their Favorite Works

06:00 - 9 December, 2018
30 Years After Luis Barragán: 30 Architects Share Their Favorite Works, Los Clubes - Cuadra San Cristóbal y Fuente de los Amantes / Luis Barragán. Image © Rodrigo Flores
Los Clubes - Cuadra San Cristóbal y Fuente de los Amantes / Luis Barragán. Image © Rodrigo Flores

Torres de Satélite / Luis Barragán + Mathias Goeritz. Image © Rodrigo Flores Casa Barragán. Image © Rodrigo Flores Casa Gilardi / Luis Barragán. Image © Eduardo Luque Casa Gilardi / Luis Barragán. Image © Eduardo Luque + 16

On November 22, 1988, one of the most important and revered figures in the history of Mexican and international architecture died in Mexico City. Luis Barragán Morfín, born in Guadalajara and trained as a civil engineer left behind an extensive legacy of published works, conferences, buildings, houses, and gardens that remain relevant to this day. While Barragán was known for his far-reaching research in customs and traditions, above all, the architect spent his life in contemplation. His sensitivity to the world and continued effort to rewrite the mundane has made him a lasting figure in Mexico, and the world.

Undoubtedly, Luis Barragán's legacy represents something so complex and timeless that it continues to inspire and surprise architects across generations. It is because of this that, 30 years after his death, we've compiled this series of testimonies from some of Mexico's most prominent contemporary architects, allowing them to reflect on their favorites of Barragan's works and share just how his work has impacted and inspired theirs. 

21 Examples of Brise Soleils in Mexico and Its Diverse Applications

08:00 - 2 July, 2018
21 Examples of Brise Soleils in Mexico and Its Diverse Applications

Estudio Iturbide / Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo. Image Cortesía de Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo Vivienda en Puebla / Comunal Taller de Arquitectura. Image © Onnis Luque Juzgados Oral-Penal en Pátzcuaro / Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo. Image © Rafael Gamo La Tallera / Frida Escobedo. Image © Rafael Gamo + 22

The brise soleil is an architectural element that has been used since ancient times to create subtle barriers between the interior and the exterior. Its use and design have been diversified over the years through the research and technology with which these elements are applied, creating the ability to build a small window to a complete facade and pavilion that seem to float.

We know that Mexico is a country with one of the most diverse climates, thus the use of a brise soleil is positioned stronger within the guild. Also, rural areas have long adapted the feature in Mexico, demonstrating its beauty and usefulness. Read on for our collection of 21 brise soleil features in Mexican projects to inspire you with its diverse applications.

Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards

12:40 - 1 February, 2018
Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards, Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales
Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales

The Architectural League of New York has announced the recipients of its 2018 Emerging Voices awards, spotlighting individuals and firms “with distinct design voices and the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism.”

The Ambitious Project that Brings Together 44 Mexican and International Architects

06:00 - 19 September, 2017
The Ambitious Project that Brings Together 44 Mexican and International Architects, © Adlai Pulido
© Adlai Pulido

In Baja California, Mexico, the 860 hectares that make up 'Cuatro Cuatros'—a tourism development that for the past ten years has been overseen and designed by Mauricio Rocha and Gabriela Carrillo of Taller de Arquitectura—present an arid and mostly monochromatic landscape interrupted only by stones and bushland.

Vast as the site may seem, only 360 of its hectares will be destined for housing development, of which only 10% can be impacted by construction. The challenge will lay in mitigating the protagonistic stance architecture usually assumes when conquering previously untouched lands, by taking on a presence that disappears into the landscape. 

The 10 Best Global* Architecture Projects of 2016 (*Asia, Africa and South America Not Excluded)

08:00 - 15 January, 2017
The 10 Best Global* Architecture Projects of 2016 (*Asia, Africa and South America Not Excluded)

As the common phrase attests, “history is written by the victors.” We therefore know that the story of the West is that of Europe and the United States, while the other actors in world history are minimized or invisible: it happened to the Chinese and Japanese during World War II, to the Ottoman Empire in sixteenth-century Europe, and to racial majorities in the common reading of Latin American independence. The same thing happens in architecture.

The current boom of the Global South is based not only on new work, but rather on the recognition of an invisible architecture which was apparently not worthy of publication in the journals of the 1990s. The world stage has changed, with the emergence of a humanity that is decentralized yet local; globalized, yet heterogeneous; accelerated, yet unbalanced. There are no longer red and blue countries, but a wide variety of colors, exploding like a Pollock painting.

This serves as a preamble to consider the outstanding projects of 2016 according to the British critic Oliver Wainwright, whose map of the world appears to extend from New York in the West to Oslo in the East, with the exception of Birzeit in Palestine. The Global South represents more than 40% of the global economy and already includes most of the world’s megacities, yet has no architecture worthy of recognition? We wanted to highlight the following projects in order to expand the western-centric world view, enabling us to truly comprehend the extent of architectural innovation on a global scale.