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Andrea Palladio: The Latest Architecture and News

Cristopher Cichocki's Places Art in Architecture to Spark a Discussion About Environmental Sustainability

12:00 - 20 October, 2018
Courtesy of Geoplast
Courtesy of Geoplast

Cristopher Cichocki's Root Cycle combines installation art with existing architecture in an effort to spark a discussion regarding the relationship between design, both contemporary and historical, and environmental sustainability.

Cichocki partnered with Geoplast, a local Italian designer and manufacturer dedicated to producing innovative sustainable design products. The artist uses a particular Geoplast elevator product and Aloe Vera plants as the main components for the artwork.

8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles

09:30 - 26 January, 2018
8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles, Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/7455207@N05/5491325900/'>Flickr user SBA73</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © Flickr user SBA73 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Throughout history, there have been certain architects whose unique ideas and innovative styles have influenced generations to come. Some of these pioneers introduced ideas so revolutionary that entirely new words had to be invented to truly encapsulate them. Whether they became a style embraced by an entire era, or captured the imagination of millions for decades to come, we know a Gaudiesque or Corbusian building when we see one.

Here are eight adjectives derived from the works of architects whose names are now in the dictionary:

Ronchamp by Le Corbusier. Image via <a href='http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Ronchamp-Snow-Chapel-Notre-dame-You-Skin-De-Ronchamp-372579'>Maxpixel</a> Farnsworth House by Mies Van Der Rohe. Image © Jack E. Boucher <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/il0323/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) Fuente de los Amantes by Luis Barragan. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/esparta/3573608700'>Flickr user esparta</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a> Trinity Church, Boston by Henry Hobson Richardson. Image © Carol M. Highsmith <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/highsm.12234/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) + 9

Explore Endless Palladian-Inspired Facades Using This Random Generator

12:00 - 26 May, 2017

In his seminal work, Four Books on Architecture (1570), Andrea Palladio outlined the architectural elements that would make up his signature style, borrowing from the architecture of the ancient Romans and the principles directed by Vitruvius and Leon Battista Alberti. In designing his buildings, Palladio employed a full palette of motifs, from pediments to loggias to porticos, resulting in structures that followed a certain formula, while remaining individually distinct.

Recognizing the architectural patterns in his work, programmer “23” (Paul O’Leary McCann) set out to create a code project that could randomly generate Palladian-inspired facades. Adjusting the to size of your screen, the program can create facades ranging in scale from one-story temples to elaborate mega-structures that bear similarity to the magnificent toy block towers created by future-architect children.

Study Determines That This is (Probably) What Andrea Palladio Looked Like

04:00 - 17 April, 2017
Study Determines That This is (Probably) What Andrea Palladio Looked Like, Left: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio purchased at an antiques store in New Jersey, USA. Right: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio in a private collection in Moscow, Russia. Image via The New York Times / Palladio Museum
Left: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio purchased at an antiques store in New Jersey, USA. Right: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio in a private collection in Moscow, Russia. Image via The New York Times / Palladio Museum

In today's culture of narcissism and celebrity it's an assumed expectation that faces can be put to names. Even in 16th Century Europe, the large majority of notable persons had a likeness made of themselves and displayed for posterity – save for architects, it seems. Take, for instance, Andrea Palladio (1508-1580) – the Renaissance style-setter and author of the groundbreaking treatise The Four Books on Architecture, the seminal text of which inspired the likes of Thomas Jefferson. If challenged, could you easily put a face to Palladio's name? There is no accurate, agreed-upon "official" portrait of the architect – until now, that is.

AD Classics: University of Virginia / Thomas Jefferson

04:00 - 8 December, 2016
AD Classics: University of Virginia / Thomas Jefferson, © Larry Harris
© Larry Harris

The end of the War of 1812 left the young United States of America awash with nationalist fervor. In the following years, the world’s first modern republic experienced unprecedented growth and prosperity; it was not without reason that the period came to be known as the “Era of Good Feelings.”[1] It was into this epoch of unbridled national pride that Thomas Jefferson, one of the country’s founding fathers and its third President, introduced his master plan for the University of Virginia: an architectural manifestation of the Enlightenment and republican ideals he had helped cultivate.

Ground floor plan and elevation of the Rotunda. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user Fæ Pavilion X was the only pavilion of the ten to feature Corinthian design elements. ImageCourtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain) Courtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain) Courtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain) + 37

Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing

08:30 - 18 August, 2016
Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing, Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects
Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects

For Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki and David J. Lewis, the section “is often understood as a reductive drawing type, produced at the end of the design process to depict structural and material conditions in service of the construction contract.” A definition that will be familiar to most of those who have studied or worked in architecture at some point. We often think primarily of the plan, for it allows us to embrace the programmatic expectations of a project and provide a summary of the various functions required. In the modern age, digital modelling software programs offer ever more possibilities when it comes to creating complex three dimensional objects, making the section even more of an afterthought.

With their Manual of Section, the three founding partners of LTL architects engage with section as an essential tool of architectural design, and let’s admit it, this reading might change your mind on the topic. For the co-authors, “thinking and designing through section requires the building of a discourse about section, recognizing it as a site of intervention.” Perhaps, indeed, we need to understand the capabilities of section drawings both to use them more efficiently and to enjoy doing so.

Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon (1976). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects Notre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier (1954). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects United States Pavilion at Expo '67 by Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao (1967). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (1959). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects + 15

Exhibition: Palladian Design: The Good, the Bad and the Unexpected

07:00 - 29 August, 2015
Exhibition: Palladian Design: The Good, the Bad and the Unexpected, Glashutte, France by Oswald Mathias Ungers, 1985 (c) Stefan Mueller
Glashutte, France by Oswald Mathias Ungers, 1985 (c) Stefan Mueller

Andrea Palladio is the only architect who has given his name to a style – one that is still in use around the world after nearly 500 years. From the US Capitol to a 21st century Somerset cowshed, 'Palladian Design: The Good, the Bad and the Unexpected' introduces Palladio’s design principles and explores how they have been interpreted, copied and re-imagined across time and continents from his death in 1580 to the present day.

Gallery: Palladio in Vicenza

04:15 - 29 July, 2015
Gallery: Palladio in Vicenza, © Phillip Bond
© Phillip Bond

Phillip Bond, an architectural photographer based in the US, recently made a trip back to the city of his birth: Vicenza. While there he took the opportunity to photograph a series of Andrea Palladio's most famous works, from the Palazzo Chiericati and the Basilica Palladiana, to the Palazzo del Capitaniato. The vast majority of Palladio's built works exist in the Veneto region of Italy in cities such as Padua, Verona, and Venice with the highest concentration in Vicenza, which was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994.

See the gallery in full after the break.

Palladio in Vincenza. Image © Phillip Bond Palazzo Chiericati. Image © Phillip Bond © Phillip Bond © Phillip Bond + 29

HHbR Develop A "Palladian Model" For Contemporary Affordable Housing

00:00 - 11 February, 2015
HHbR Develop A "Palladian Model" For Contemporary Affordable Housing, Courtesy of HHbR
Courtesy of HHbR

London based practice Henley Halebrown Rorrison’s (HHbR) have unveiled a scheme for affordable housing based on a model inspired by Andrea Palladio's Villa Capra (1566-1571) near Vicenza. The Pocket Rotunda model hinges around their developer’s ambition to offer new two-bedroom accommodation that will help open up home ownership to couples with young children, joint buyers, and single parent families who earn too much to qualify for social housing but are, nevertheless, priced out of the UK market.

Andrea Palladio's Works on Display

19:00 - 14 October, 2011
© Royal Institute of British Architects, British Architectural Library, V/3
© Royal Institute of British Architects, British Architectural Library, V/3

Architect Andrea Palladio’s (1508–1580) influence can be found throughout the world in monumental architectural works on both sides of the Atlantic. His Four Books on Architecture (1570) are some of the most famous and influential writings on architectural theory. The Royal Institute of British Architects Trust in conjunction with the Centro Internazionale di Studi di Architettura Andrea Palladio, Vicenza, has organized a traveling exhibition called Palladio and His Legacy: A Transatlantic Journey. This display will offer up a unique opportunity to view the numerous works, drawings, and models of one of the most influential architects of the last 500 years. Hosted by the Carnegie Museum of Art in their Heinz Architectural Center, the exhibition will run from September 3-December 31, 2011.

'Palladio at Work' Exhibition at The Canadian Centre for Architecture

12:00 - 11 March, 2011



Courtesy of London, RIBA British Architectural Library. VIII/11v
Courtesy of London, RIBA British Architectural Library. VIII/11v

The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) is hosting an exhibition of Palladio’s drawings, giving new insight into the use of drawings as a tool to record, develop and disseminate his ideas. Curated by Guido Beltramini, in collaboration with Charles Hind, Palladio at Work will be on view in the museum’s Octogonal Gallery from March 3 to May 22, 2011.

More on the exihibition and on Andrea Palladio after the break.