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Adrià Goula

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Parking in the Huertas de Caldes / Ravetllat-Ribas

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 28

  • Architects: Ravetllat-Ribas
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  7011
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: MEYPAR, Nuno Almeida

CA House / Eloi Camacho Arquitectura

© Adrià Goula
© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 17

Vinyols i els Arcs, Spain
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  430
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Grespania, Technal, Placo saint-gobain

House 1510 / Nordest Arquitectura

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 22

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  450
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Threshold Stairs House / Comas-Pont arquitectes

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 15

Ribes de Freser, Spain
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  22
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Allplan
  • Professionals: Metàl.liques Olot

How to Build with Zero-Kilometer Wood? The Experience of The Voxel in Barcelona

Zero kilometer materials can be purchased locally, do not need to be transformed by large stages of industrial processing or toxic treatments and, at the end of their service life, they can be returned to the environment.

For example, wood from a nearby forest eliminates the need for long transfers, valuing local resources, and allowing architecture to lessen its environmental impact while committed to the landscape and context.

S2 House / BELLAFILARQUITECTES

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 26

  • Architects: BELLAFILARQUITECTES
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  204
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Professionals: Sustenta

L+C House / Gabriel Montañés Arquitecto

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 14

Design Depot: 30 Projects that Explore Diverse Storage Solutions

With the rise of small houses and dense cities, we were forced to sacrifice a good amount of storage space. Ironically, we did not compromise our purchasing habits, so with a few square meters to work with, architects and designers had to come up with efficient storage solutions, and make the best of the limited space they have. However, if you were lucky enough to be occupying a large, unobscured space with a generous budget, your storage design possibilities are endless. In this article, we look at how architects and designers found creative ways to store their belongings in spaces with different functions, scales, and spatial constraints, ranging between completely invisible units to sculptural centerpieces.

© Anna Positano© CreatAR Images© Daici Ano© Luis Gomes+ 39

E House / Gabriel Montañés Arquitecto

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 24

Menorca, Spain
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  617
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Dornbracht, GRAPHISOFT, DuPont, -, Francisco Gomila, +9

AA House / Alventosa Morell Arquitectes

© Adrià Goula
© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 23

Barcelona, Spain
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  170
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Focus, Flos, Rovira

Clos Pachem Winery / HARQUITECTES

© Jesús Granada© Jesús Granada© Jesús Granada© Adrià Goula+ 25

Gratallops, Spain

A Guide to Off-Grid Architectures

Anyone who lives in a big city may have dreamed of moving elsewhere and living isolated, in a house among the trees or on a deserted beach. During the pandemic and the endless months of quarantine, many more may have had this same idea. As romantic and seductive as this may seem, however, living deep in nature comes with some important practical challenges. Rarely would anyone give up the little comforts they are used to, like turning on a faucet or charging their cell phone. If the location is, in fact, remote, it may not have electricity, drinking water, gas, sewage, or solid waste collection. But there remain several possibilities for a life with comfort and without neighbors. What are the main solutions to enable this and how can an architectural project provide an off-the-grid life?

Cyclopean Concrete and Its Many Diverse Uses and Applications in Architecture

Historically, "cyclopean" referred to a building technique that superimposed large stone blocks together without any mortar. This allowed for a diverse array of structures across various civilizations, including defensive walls, talayots, navetas, nuraghes, temples, tombs, and forts. Nowadays, the term applies to any ancient structure consisting of large stones superimposed to form a polygonal shape.

El Til·ler School / Eduard Balcells + Tigges Architekt + Ignasi Rius Architecture

© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula© Adrià Goula+ 42

Bellaterra, Spain

Cloth and Linen Walls: Translucent and Weightless

CO2 Pavilion Beijing / Superimpose Architecture. Image © Beijing Shardisland Technology Co., Ltd.Endesa World Fab Condenser / MARGEN-LAB. Image © Adrià GoulaHousing Building Sucre 812 / Ana Smud + Alberto Smud. Image © Javier Agustín RojasTextile Academy NRW / slapa oberholz pszczulny | sop architekten. Image © Thomas Mayer+ 21

Whether made from natural or synthetic fibers, textiles have played a part in architectural design since time immemorial; however, it wasn't until the era of industrialization and advancements in technology that high-quality textiles could be made and utilized en masse. Most often, they have been used to enclose temporary structures like medical tents and emergency housing thanks to their mobility and ease of assembly.