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Nicolás Valencia

Editorial Data & Content Manager at Archdaily | @nicolasvalencia.cl

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Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

The award is an initiative funded by Jay Pritzker through the Hyatt Foundation, an organization associated with the hotel company of the same name that Jay founded with his brother Donald in 1957. The award was first given in 1979, when the American architect Philip Johnson, was awarded for his iconic works such as the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut.

The Pritzker Prize has been awarded for almost forty straight years without interruption, and there are now 18 countries with at least one winning architect. To date, half of the winners are European; while the Americas, Asia, and Oceania share the other twenty editions. So far, no African architect has been awarded, making it the only continent without a winner.

Pritzker Prize 2020 Winner To Be Announced Tuesday, March 3rd

The Hyatt Foundation has revealed the announcement date of the Pritzker Prize 2020 Winner. The most relevant recognition in architecture will be announced on Tuesday, March 3rd, 10 am EST.

Not All Parks Should be Green: 10 Tips to Design Landscape Infrastructure

Does it make sense to design green parks in desert cities such as Casablanca, Dubai, or Lima? Ostensibly it does, because they contribute freshness and greenness to the urban environment. In exchange, however, they disrupt native local ecosystems, incur high maintenance bills, and begin a constant struggle to ensure water availability.

Kaukari Urban Park, designed in the desert city of Copiapó (Chile) by the Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos office. Image © Rodrigo Opazo Landscape Shanghai Minsheng, designed by Atelier Liu Yuyang Architects. Image © FangFang Tian Dania Park in the Oresund Strait between Sweden and Denmark, designed by Sweco Architects + Thorbjörn Andersson. Image © Sweco Architects + Thorbjörn Andersson Parque Urbano Kaukari, diseñado en la desértica ciudad de Copiapó (Chile) por la oficina Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos. Image Cortesía de Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos + 10

The World's Most Influential Events and Awarded Architecture in 2019

2019 has been a very fruitful year in architecture, unveiling projects, discourses, and careers that cover most of the multiple layers, interest, and fields related to this discipline, and highlighting how relevant it has become to our societies —from the Pritzker Prize 2019 awarded to Japanese architect Arata Isozaki to the revealed theme of the Venice Biennale 2020. Take a look at the main architectural milestones of this year across the globe.

Data from 350,000 Smartphones Visualize the Urban Segregation in Chile

Regardless of where you live or work or who you’re friends with, you usually move around the same neighbourhoods and streets of your city. It may be London, Santiago, Shanghai, or Moscow, but in any of these places, there are always districts you have never set a foot in. Have you ever considered how many ‘cities’ are within your own city?

A research article published in The Royal Society Open Science and signed by Chilean researchers utilizes big data to analyze and visualize urban segregation, delivering spatial tools that allow us to develop strategies in a city of many cities. "We know there are [social] bubbles in Santiago, Chile, and that therefore, there is segregation," says Teodoro Dannemann, co-author of the research paper The time geography of segregation during working hours, in a conversation with ArchDaily. “We know that each person explores only a small fraction of the city, which is basically the home-work trajectory. This implies that we only engage with a small group of citizens," he adds.

What Can Design do in Chile's Social Crisis? Nothing.

This article was originally published in ArchDaily en Español last October 30, twelve days after the social crisis in Chile escalated. Some ideas of the analysis may feel outdated since some structural reforms were recently announced, but the author decided to keep the original spirit of the piece.

A 4 cent fair increase for the Metro in Santiago sparked mass fare-dodging protests in Chile starting on October 6. Alongside spontaneous street demonstrations, the protests spilled into widespread violence across Santiago during the following days until October 18. That day, the Metro network collapsed, the riots multiplied across the city, and looting and fires were out of control. That night, President Sebastian Piñera declared a state of emergency.

Santiago during the largest march recorded in Chile last October 25, 2019. Image © Nicolás Valencia Santiago during the largest march recorded in Chile last October 25, 2019. Image © Nicolás Valencia Plaza Italia square, Santiago's symbolic gravity center, during the largest march recorded in Chile last October 25, 2019. Image © Nicolás Valencia Plaza Italia square, Santiago's symbolic gravity center, during the largest march recorded in Chile last October 25, 2019. Image © Nicolás Valencia + 5

Mendes da Rocha and Al Borde among Winners of the XI Ibero-American Architecture and Urbanism Biennial (XI BIAU)

In Asunción (Paraguay), the XI Ibero-American Architecture and Urbanism Biennial (XI BIAU) have presented the winners of the Panorama de Obras section (Projects Panorama) of this contest edition, "all faithful to the spirit of the XI BIAU: living, the inhabitant," according to the organization.

Among 997 proposed works throughout Latin America, 17 architectural works —predominantly public projects— built in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Spain, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Uruguay and Venezuela are the winners of the XI BIAU.

Idealism as the Impetus of American City Planning

The Truman Show is a 1998 dramedy starring Jim Carrey as Truman Burbank, the unwitting star of a 24-hour reality show that began at his birth. Set in Seahaven, a city-scale television studio designed to covertly record Truman's entire life, the show attempts to divert Truman from any potential suspicion that every single person he meets is an actor or actress.

Foster + Partners To Design First Project in Chile

A 301,400-square-feet extension for a shopping center and two 12-story buildings will be the first project by Foster + Partners in Chile, according to local newspaper El Mercurio.

Planned to be built in San Joaquin, a predominantly industrial, working-class neighborhood in Santiago, Chile, the project will be made for real estate company Grupo Patio.

Sharjah Architecture Triennial Announces Global South-based Participants and Projects for Its Inaugural Edition

Curated by Adrian Lahoud, The Sharjah Architecture Triennial opens this November, self-proclaiming as "the first international platform on architecture and urbanism of the Global South."

Lahoud, who is also Dean of the School of Architecture at the Royal College of Art, has defined the theme for the inaugural edition —Rights of Future Generations— as an instance to "question how inheritance, legacy, and the state of the environment are passed from one generation to the next, how present decisions have long-term intergenerational consequences, and how other expressions of co-existence, including indigenous ones, might challenge dominant western perspectives."

ArchDaily Topics - July: Resilience in Architecture

Resilience has become increasingly common in our vocabulary when we talk about people, buildings, cities or even whole societies overcoming all kind of problems. In fact, Google searches related to resilience have continued to grow since 2004 in English, Spanish, and Portuguese.

Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example

Chile is a country used to natural disasters as much as to the reconstruction process. However, the frequency of these cycles has increased over the years. According to the Ministry of Interior (Homeland), 43% of all natural disasters recorded in Chile since 1960 happened between 2014 and 2017. In fact, the government is already involved in several reconstruction processes across the country.

Designed by Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos, Kaukari Urban Park turned the channel of the Copiapó River into an accessible urban green space, capable of controling potential floods, just as it happened in 2015. Image © Rodrigo Opazo Designed by Sebastian Irarrázaval, the Constitución Public Library was part of a public-private initiative taken to rebuild the city of Constitución after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Felipe Díaz Contardo Designed by PLAN Arquitectos, Constitución's Consistorial Town Hall was part of the reconstruction of the city after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Pablo Blanco Villa Verde Housing / ELEMENTAL. Image © Suyin Chia + 7

When is Architecture Day?

In 1996, at the International Union of Architects Congress held in Barcelona, Spain, the organization established that World Architecture Day should coincide with UN-Habitat's World Habitat Day. Therefore, the first Monday of October we celebrate our commitment as architects to our society and our cities.

Nevertheless, some countries around the world kept their national celebrations, highlighting their local milestones, as it happens across Latin America. Did you know Brazil celebrates Architecture Day in December paying homage to Oscar Niemeyer's birthday?

In chronological order, these countries celebrate Architecture Day on the following dates:

What's Pushing Refurbishment Fever in China?

China seems to be at the peak of a refurbishment fever. Not only hutongs in historic downtowns, but abandoned industrial factories are becoming new tech or cultural hubs, and even buildings in the risk of collapse are refurbished to extend their lifespan. Why is this happening? Who is investing? How could this happen in a country where you cannot buy properties?

In this edition of Editor's Talk, our editors from ArchDaily China share their thoughts on how in a fast-paced development process, such as the one China is going through, there is a refurbishment fever in its biggest cities.