Nicolás Valencia

Nicolas Valencia is the Editorial & Data Manager of ArchDaily, leading a truly global editorial team. Former ArchDaily in Spanish Editor | @nicolasvalencia.cl

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Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

Jadue-Livingstone Will Design the Parque Observatorio on Cerro Calán in Santiago

The panel of judges overseeing the design contest for Parque Observatorio Cerro Calán in Santiago (Chile) publicized their final decision on January 28, naming Chilean firm Jadue-Livingstone as the winner out of the five finalists.

Organized by the Las Condes Municipality in collaboration with the University of Chile and the Cerros Isla Foundation, the contest aimed to find the best architectural and landscape design for an upcoming park in Santiago, Chile: the Parque Observatorio Cerro Calán, a 45 hectare space to be built around the already existing Observatorio Astronómico Nacional.

Plaza elevada. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro CalánEstanque. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro CalánZona de picinic. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro CalánNodo: Sendero Central. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro Calán+ 13

Finalists Released for New Observatory Urban Park Competition in Santiago

The shortlist for the design of a 111-acres observatory urban park covering the Calan Hill in Santiago, Chile, has been officially released by a jury of experts.

Organized by the Municipality of Las Condes in collaboration with the University of Chile and the Cerros Isla Foundation, the competition seeks to choose the best architecture and landscape proposal for the design of a new urban natural park in Santiago: the Cerro Calan Observatory Urban Park (Parque Observatorio Cerro Calán)

Propuesta: Parque Observatorio Cerro Calán. Lámina 01. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro CalánPropuesta: Cerro Calán, Parque Natural de la Observación. Lámina 01. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro CalánPropuesta: Los collares del Cerro Isla. Lámina 03. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro CalánPropuesta: Paisaje en Proceso. Lámina 02. Image Cortesía de Parque Observatorio Cerro Calán+ 16

Alfredo Jaar: Sadness as an Uninhabitable Space

This article is based on a lecture given by Chilean artist and architect Alfredo Jaar at the 20th Architecture and Urbanism Biennale in Valparaiso, Chile, on October 26, 2017.

It's June of 1980. Alfredo Jaar, a recent dropout of the University of Chile's architecture program, walks through the center of Santiago carrying two large signs. He grabs a spot in the shade next to a kiosk and intercepts passers-by to ask them his questions. In the midst of a military dictatorship, Jaar wants the people to vote, but not for the constitutional plebiscite or in the democratic elections. He doesn't even have paper or pencil for them to vote with. There's no line to mark on. His campaign centers on a mint--white and round--like a casino raffle ball.

Jaar's questions are loaded ones. "Are you happy?" (¿Es usted feliz?) he asks. "How many people in Chile do you think are happy?" "How many people in the world?"

Young Talent Architecture Award 2020 Announces Winners

The Fundació Mies van der Rohe and Creative Europe have announced the four winners of the Young Talent Architecture Award YTAA 2020 and of the Asia Edition of the YTAA 2020

Established in 2016, the YTAA “supports the talent of recently graduated architects, urban planners, and landscape architects who will be responsible for transforming our environment in the future." The third edition of the Young Talent Architecture Award counted with 382 graduation projects that competed to win the YTAA 2020, featuring 478 students of 155 schools registered from 36 different European countries including Brazil, Chile, and Mexico participating as guest countries.

Who Has Won the RIBA Royal Gold Medal?

Recognized as the UK’s highest honor for architecture, the RIBA Royal Gold Medal for Architecture is approved personally by Her Majesty The Queen and is given to a person or group of people who have had a significant influence "either directly or indirectly on the advancement of architecture.", according to the organization.

No 1 Poultry / James Stirling. Image © Claudio Divizia | ShutterstockQatar National Convention Centre / Arata Isozaki. Image © Nelson GarridoCasa da Musica / OMA. Image © Philippe RuaultAntwerp Port House / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Helene Binet+ 13

Finalists Released for Asian Edition of YTAA 2020

The Fundació Mies van der Rohe and Creative Europe have announced the 9 finalist projects competing to win the Asian Edition of Young Talent Architecture Award 2020 (YTAA 2020). Established in 2016, the YTAA “supports the talent of recently graduated Architects, Urban Planners and Landscape Architects who will be responsible for transforming our environment in the future."

Finalists Released for 2020 Young Talent Architecture Award

The Fundació Mies van der Rohe and Creative Europe have announced the 12 finalist projects competing to win the Young Talent Architecture Award 2020 (YTAA 2020) and the 9 finalist projects competing to win the Asian Edition of YTAA 2020. Established in 2016, the YTAA “supports the talent of recently graduated Architects, Urban Planners and Landscape Architects who will be responsible for transforming our environment in the future."

Valparaiso Architecture Guide: Places to Visit in Chile's Jewel of the Pacific

Situated at the foot of 45 hills along the Chilean coast, Valparaíso was a key port in the South Pacific during the 20th century before the construction of the Panama Canal. Thanks to its rapid industrial and commercial growth, the port underwent an urban transformation, attracting thousands of foreigners and cementing its reputation as a bustling South American cosmopolis rich in society, culture, and architecture.  

Described by The Guardian as a "Berlin by the seaside", Valparaiso's historic downtown was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2003 and the city's cultural and architectural wealth make it a must-see for tourists and architecture aficionados alike.

In this article, we present a guide written by one of the city's many enthusiasts that will give a complete and in-depth look at the port's many treasures. The guide is written as if for a walking tour, starting in Plaza Sotomayor, the city's main square. The route can be divided into two days, with the first part ending at the Palacio Baburizza and the second beginning with the Valparaiso Cultural Park. Take a tip from the experts--if you get lost, don't trust an app to find your way. Ask a local!

Lydia Kallipoliti and Areti Markopoulou Appointed Head Curators of Tallinn Architecture Biennale 2022

The Estonian Centre for Architecture has announced “Edible. Or, the Architecture of Metabolism” as the topic for the next Tallinn Architecture Biennale 2022 (TAB 2022), while the selected head curators are architects Lydia Kallipoliti and Areti Markopoulou in collaboration with co-curator Ivan Sergejev.

'Restoration' Will Represent Chile in the Venice Biennale 2021

With the submission of "Reparation: Architecture of Action and Everyday Experiences," Chilean architect Emilio Marín will curate the Chilean exhibit at this year's Biennale of Venice, as announced by a spokesperson for the Ministry of Culture, Art, and Heritage.

Carlos García Vázquez: "The Modern Urbanism Has Rediscovered Traditional Cities"

Three years ago, in the wake of the release of his book Theories and History of the Modern City ("Teorías e Historia de la Ciudad Contemporánea", 2016, Editorial Gustavo Gili), we sat down with the author, Carlos García Vázquez, to discuss this complex and "uncertain creature' that is the modern city, focusing on the three categories that define cities today: Metropolis, Megalopolis, and Metapolis.

Based on an analysis of those "who have traditionally led the way in the planning of spaces" (sociologists, historians, and architects), the book illustrates the social, economic, and political forces that, in service to their own agendas, drive the planning, transformation, exploitation, and development of cities. In 120 years, urban centers have transformed from places where "people died from the city" to bastions of personal development and economic prosperity; however, the question remains —have cities really triumphed?

"Yes", says García Vásquez, "but we have paid dearly for it."

Night Life in Nueva York. Image © Joana FrançaHong Kong in the 90s, when it was still a British colony, but undergoing rapid economic development. Image © Wonderlane [Flickr], under CC BY 2.0 licenseBrasilia. Image © Joana FrançaCarlos García Vázquez. Image © María Carrascal+ 11