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Nicolas Valencia

Editorial Data & Content Manager at Archdaily | @nicolasvalencia.cl

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The World's Most Liveable Cities in 2019

07:30 - 8 April, 2019
The World's Most Liveable Cities in 2019, Strandbar Herrmann. Vienna, Austria. Image © Christian Stemper, via Vienna Tourist Board
Strandbar Herrmann. Vienna, Austria. Image © Christian Stemper, via Vienna Tourist Board

For ten consecutive years, Vienna ranks first in the Mercer survey on cities with the best quality of life in the world. In this edition to the global ranking, eight Western European cities join the top ten, even when "trade tensions and populist undercurrents continue to dominate the global economic climate", as Mercer points out in its report.

Why Do Architects Love Designing Houses?

04:00 - 25 March, 2019
Why Do Architects Love Designing Houses?, © <a href="//commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Euelbenul&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1">User:Euelbenul</a> - <span>Own work</span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>, <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51360903">Link</a>. ImageFallingwater House, iconic project designed by Frank Lloyd Wright back in 1939
© User:Euelbenul - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link. ImageFallingwater House, iconic project designed by Frank Lloyd Wright back in 1939

Home. Our shelter. Our private space. In an urbanized world with dense megalopolises like Tokyo, Shanghai, and São Paulo, homes are getting smaller and more expensive than ever. If you are claustrophobic, Marie Kondo is your best ally in the quest to earn some extra space.  And even though private backyards have become a luxury for most, our data shows that single-family houses are still the most popular project type on ArchDaily. Why is this? (Especially when it seems incongruous given the reality of today’s crowded cities.) Why do some universities still insist on designing and building houses as academic exercises? Wouldn’t it be more creative—and more useful—to develop architecture in small-scale spaces? Would it be more rewarding to develop solutions on bigger scales?

From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles

05:30 - 14 March, 2019
From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles, Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban
Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban

Back in 2008, ArchDaily embarked on a challenging mission: to provide inspiration, knowledge, and tools to the architects tasked with designing cities. In an effort to further align our strategy with these challenges, we recently introduced monthly themes in order to dig deeper into topics we find relevant in today’s architectural discourse. From architects who don't design to reframing climate change as a global issue, we are celebrating our 11th birthday by asking 11 editors and curators to choose ArchDaily's most inspiring articles.

50 AutoCAD Commands You Should Know

08:30 - 13 March, 2019

After spending countless hours in front of AutoCAD working on a project, you’re bound to have your own set of favorite commands to standardize a few steps. We also bet that you don’t have them all memorized or often forget them. To help you remember, we've made a list of 50 commands that can help you speed up your work game, discover new shortcuts, or come in use as a handy tool for when you forget what the command you need is called.

The following listing was developed and corroborated by our team for the 2013, 2014 and 2015 versions of AutoCAD in English. We also prepared a series of GIFs to visualize some of the trickier ones.

When you’ve finished reading, we would love to know what your favorite commands are (including those that we didn’t include). We will use your input to help us update the article!

Why Arata Isozaki won the Pritzker Prize 2019

09:32 - 7 March, 2019

Named 2019 Pritzker Prize Laureate, Japanese architect Arata Isozaki is incredibly prolific and influential among his contemporaries. Deeply aligned with the period of change and reinvention that Japan experimented after Second World War and Allied Occupation, Isozaki has developed a solid career on a truly global scale, avoiding being labeled in a specific style throughout his life.

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

14:00 - 3 March, 2019
Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?, Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize
Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

The award is an initiative funded by Jay Pritzker through the Hyatt Foundation, an organization associated with the hotel company of the same name that Jay founded with his brother Donald in 1957. The award was first given in 1979, when the American architect Philip Johnson, was awarded for his iconic works such as the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut.

The Pritzker Prize has been awarded for almost forty straight years without interruption, and there are now 18 countries with at least one winning architect. To date, half of the winners are European; while the Americas, Asia, and Oceania share the other twenty editions. So far, no African architect has been awarded, making it the only continent without a winner.

Why Keep Drawing When Digital Tools Deliver Hyperrealistic Images?

07:00 - 25 February, 2019
Why Keep Drawing When Digital Tools Deliver Hyperrealistic Images?, Moon Hoon's ilustration of KPOP Curve in South Korea. Image © Moon Hoon
Moon Hoon's ilustration of KPOP Curve in South Korea. Image © Moon Hoon

Starting this month, ArchDaily has introduced monthly themes that we’ll explore in our stories, posts and projects. We began this month with Architectural Representation: from Archigram to Instagram; from napkins sketching to real-time-sync VR models; from academic lectures to storytellers.

It isn’t particularly novel or groundbreaking to say that the internet, social media, and design apps have challeged the relation between representation and building. A year ago we predicted that "this is just the beginning of a new stage of negotiation between the cold precision of technology and the expressive quality inherent in architecture". But, is it? Would you say digital tools are betraying creativity? This is an older dilemma than you think.

In this new edition of our Editor's Talk, four editors and curators at ArchDaily discuss drawings as pieces of art, posit why nobody cares about telephone poles on renders and explore how the building itself is becoming a type of representation.

In 'Ugly Lies the Bone' (2018), Es Devlin created a scenario that allowed the audience to look through a VR set as part of the presentation of the play. Image © Es Devlin On 'HYPER-REALITY', a short film (2016), Keiichi Matsuda envisions the aftermath of life in a city highly saturated by augmented reality, where the streets display a completely new layer of representation. Image © Keiichi Matsuda fala atelier's collage for House In Rua do Paraíso in Portugal. Image © fala atelier Google Dublin. Image © Peter Wurmli + 9

9 Lessons For Post-Architecture-School Survival

05:00 - 4 February, 2019

We’ve already talked about this. You’re preparing your final project (or thesis project). You’ve gone over everything in your head a thousand times; the presentation to the panel, your project, your model, your memory, your words. You go ahead with it, but think you'll be lousy. Then you think just the opposite, you will be successful and it will all be worth it. Then everything repeats itself and you want to call it quits.  You don’t know when this roller coaster is going to end. 

Until the day arrives. You present your project. Explain your ideas. The committee asks you questions. You answer. You realize you know more than you thought you did and that none of the scenarios you imaged over the past year got even close to what really happened in the exam. The committee whisper amongst themselves. The presentation ends and they ask you to leave for a while. Outside you wait an eternity, the minutes crawling slowly. Come in, please. The commission recites a brief introduction and you can’t tell whether you were right or wrong. The commission gets to the point.

You passed! Congratulations, you are now their new colleague and they all congratulate you on your achievement. The joy washes over you despite the fatigue that you’ve dragging around with you. The adrenaline stops pumping. You spend weeks or months taking a much-deserved break. You begin to wonder: Now what?

The university, the institution that molded you into a professional (perhaps even more so than you would have liked), hands you the diploma and now you face the job market for the first time (that is if you haven’t worked before). Before leaving and defining your own markers for personal success (success is no longer measured with grades or academic evaluations), we share 9 lessons to face the world now that you're an architect.

These Are the World’s 25 Tallest Buildings

04:00 - 24 January, 2019
These Are the World’s 25 Tallest Buildings, © Marshall Gerometta/CTBUH; © zjaaosldk, bajo licencia CC0; © Carsten Schael; © K11 / New World Development; © © Ferox Seneca, bajo licencia CC BY 3.0; imagen cortesía de SOM
© Marshall Gerometta/CTBUH; © zjaaosldk, bajo licencia CC0; © Carsten Schael; © K11 / New World Development; © © Ferox Seneca, bajo licencia CC BY 3.0; imagen cortesía de SOM

Humanity has become obsessed with breaking its limits, creating new records only to break them again and again. In fact, our cities’ skylines have always been defined by those in power during every period in history. At one point churches left their mark, followed by public institutions and in the last few decades, it's commercial skyscrapers that continue to stretch taller and taller. 

But when it comes to defining which buildings are the tallest it can get complicated. Do antennas and other gadgets on top of the building count as extra meters? What happens if the last floor is uninhabitable? The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has developed their own system for classifying tall buildings, measuring from the “level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment.” Using this system more than 3,400 buildings have been categorized as over 150 meters tall.

11 Architecture Biennials to Pay Attention to in 2019

08:00 - 9 January, 2019
11 Architecture Biennials to Pay Attention to in 2019

Venice captured all architects' hearts and minds last year, but 2019 —a Venice-less year— will be still a year full of biennials and festivals around the world (many of which we're proud to be official partners of). The excitement is already building. 

From Chicago's new approaches to the traditional practices to Shenzhen's future technology prospect; from Oslo's degrowth agenda to Brazil's focus on everyday architecture, it's time to start saving dates for the following biennials around the world!

The Graduation Projects Nominated for the Archiprix International 2019

04:00 - 3 January, 2019
The Graduation Projects Nominated for the Archiprix International 2019, Courtesy of Archiprix International
Courtesy of Archiprix International

As an initiative of the Archiprix Foundation, Archiprix International 2019 recently invited all schools worldwide in Architecture, Urbanism and Landscape Architecture to select and submit their best graduation project. "This graduation work presents a wealth of ideas for a broad range of contemporary and future challenges", explains the organization on its website.

After analyzing all the submissions sent by universities from more than 100 countries, the jury —Francisco Díaz, Rosetta Elkin, Marta Moreira, Martino Tattara, and Sam Jacoby— nominated 22 projects for the awards in a special session held in Santiago, Chile. The winners of the awards will be announced at the Award ceremony on May the 3rd 2019 in the same city.

The complete list (in alphabetical order) of the projects nominated for the awards, below:

15 Colombian Projects Pushing the Brick Envelope

05:00 - 28 November, 2018
15 Colombian Projects Pushing the Brick Envelope, Casa La Serena / Sebastián Gaviria Gómez. Image © OLMO Fotografía
Casa La Serena / Sebastián Gaviria Gómez. Image © OLMO Fotografía

The greats of twentieth-century Colombian architecture were regarded for their genuine interest in brick. To this day, many of Colombia's iconic neighborhoods are filled with brick buildings. 

Below, a selection of stunning Colombian brick projects —available in this My ArchDaily public folder as well.

Casa Llano Grande / Yemail Arquitectura. Image © Santiago Pinyol Casa La Serena / Sebastián Gaviria Gómez. Image © OLMO Fotografía Edificio Primaria Colegio Anglo Colombiano / Daniel Bonilla Arquitectos. Image © Rodrigo Dávila Escuela de Música Yotoco / Espacio Colectivo Arquitectos. Image © Santiago Robayo + 16

The Same People who Designed Prisons Also Designed Schools

08:00 - 18 November, 2018
The Same People who Designed Prisons Also Designed Schools, New City School, Frederikshavn / Arkitema Architects . Image Cortesía de Arkitema Architects
New City School, Frederikshavn / Arkitema Architects . Image Cortesía de Arkitema Architects

According to architect and academic Frank Locker, in architectural education, we keep repeating the same formula from the 20th-century: teachers transmitting a rigid and basic knowledge that gives students, no matter their motivation, interests, or abilities, little to no direction. In this way, says Locker, we are replicating, literally, prisons, with no room for an integral, flexible, and versatile education.

"What do you think of when you're in a space with closed doors and a hallway where you can't enter without permission or a bell that tells you when you can enter and leave?" asks Locker.

"March of the 100 thousand umbrellas," protest in the context of the student marches of 2011 in Chile. Image © Rafael Edwards [Flickr CC] Lucie Aubrac School / Laurens&Loustau Architectes. Image © Stéphane Chalmeau Kirkmichael Primary School / Holmes Miller. Image © Andrew Lee   Saunalahti School / VERSTAS Architects. Image © Tuomas Uusheimo + 9

Medellín Launches International Contest to Design a Public Space in Pablo Escobar's Former Residence

08:00 - 10 November, 2018
Medellín Launches International Contest to Design a Public Space in Pablo Escobar's Former Residence

With the help of Empresa de Desarrollo Urbano/Urban Development Company (EDU) and La Sociedad Colombiana de Arquitectos/the Colombian Architect's Society (SCA), Medellín has launched an international competition to design a space to remember and reflect on the period between 1983 and 1994.

These years were some of the most violent in the Colombian city's history. In January 1988, a car bomb with 80 kilos of dynamite exploded in front of the Monaco Building, the former home of drug lord Pablo Escobar in El Poblado neighborhood. This was the first of a series of attacks between rival drug cartels in Medellin.

Kazuyo Sejima: "The Building is About the Size, But Also About the Details"

05:00 - 2 October, 2018
Kazuyo Sejima: "The Building is About the Size, But Also About the Details", Laszló Baán (left), Kazuyo Sejima, and Martha Thorne in Hay Festival. Image © Nicolás Valencia
Laszló Baán (left), Kazuyo Sejima, and Martha Thorne in Hay Festival. Image © Nicolás Valencia

Kazuyo Sejima, co-founder of the architecture firm SANAA, shared details of their upcoming project the New National Gallery – Ludwig Museum in Budapest at the Hay Festival Segovia in Spain. The 2010 Pritzker Prize winner linked the underlying premise of this project to three iconic museums: the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa (2004), the New Art Museum in New York (2007), and the Louvre Lens in France (2012).

In this conversation, Laszló Baán, General Director of the National Gallery, Budapest and Ministerial Commissioner of the Liget Budapest Project, explained the details of the 100-hectare (247-acre) masterplan at the heart of Hungary's capital city. The Liget Budapest Project will feature ten museums, including Sou Fujimoto's House of Hungarian Music, the expansion of the Budapest Zoo, and SANAA's New National Gallery for Budapest — a museum that will host 19th, 20th century, and contemporary artworks.

Pablo Escobar's Former Residence in Medellín Will Be Demolished to Build a Public Park

06:00 - 22 September, 2018
Pablo Escobar's Former Residence in Medellín Will Be Demolished to Build a Public Park, © datruth8 | Instagram
© datruth8 | Instagram

After a series of failed attempts, the Monaco building in Medellín will finally be demolished at the beginning of 2019, according to the Colombian newspaper El Tiempo.

The Monaco building, which was converted into a municipal asset this year, was the residence of the late drug trafficker Pablo Escobar in the El Poblado neighborhood of Medellín. In January of 1988, a car bomb with 80 kilograms of dynamite exploded in front of the building giving rise to a series of attacks between the drug cartels in Medellín.

7 Short Films About Architecture That You Won't Find on Netflix

06:00 - 14 September, 2018
7 Short Films About Architecture That You Won't Find on Netflix

If a work can be photographed, drawn, or expressed in words, it can also be the star of a film. This can be seen in Arquitectura en Corto, a Spanish cycle of short films about innovation and trends in contemporary architecture.

"The eruption and widespread availability of social media/mobile videos coupled with the need to illustrate and present innovative projects drives the union between architecture and these mediums," explains Roca Gallery and Technal, the organizers behind Arquitectura en Corto.

Last Floors of the Infamous Torre de David Have Tilted Following an Earthquake

16:00 - 27 August, 2018
Last Floors of the Infamous Torre de David Have Tilted Following an Earthquake, © <a href="//commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:EneasMx&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1">EneasMx</a>, bajo licencia <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>. ImageCentro Financiero Confinanzas, conocido también como Torre de David, en 2017
© EneasMx, bajo licencia CC BY-SA 4.0. ImageCentro Financiero Confinanzas, conocido también como Torre de David, en 2017

The last five stories of the Torre de David in Caracas have tilted 25 degrees following the largest earthquake to hit Venezuela in 100 years. The well-known building gained infamy as an unprecedented vertical "slum" when its construction was abandoned and squatters began to inhabit the unfinished structure.

The 190-meter skyscraper with 45 stories became Latin America's 8th tallest tower in the 1990s, but it was never completed. Officially known as the Centro Financiero Confinanzas when construction began in 1990, the project succumbed to Venezuela's 1994 banking crisis.