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Nicolas Valencia

Editorial Data & Content Manager at Archdaily | @nicolasvalencia.cl

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Foster + Partners To Design First Project in Chile

10:40 - 9 September, 2019
Foster + Partners To Design First Project in Chile, Norman Foster, Founder and Executive Chairman, Foster + Partners. Image © Guillermo Rodríguez
Norman Foster, Founder and Executive Chairman, Foster + Partners. Image © Guillermo Rodríguez

A 301,400-square-feet extension for a shopping center and two 12-story buildings will be the first project by Foster + Partners in Chile, according to local newspaper El Mercurio.

Planned to be built in San Joaquin, a predominantly industrial, working-class neighborhood in Santiago, Chile, the project will be made for real estate company Grupo Patio.

Sharjah Architecture Triennial Announces Global South-based Participants and Projects for Its Inaugural Edition

13:30 - 8 August, 2019
Sharjah Architecture Triennial Announces Global South-based Participants and Projects for Its Inaugural Edition, King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė
King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė

Curated by Adrian Lahoud, The Sharjah Architecture Triennial opens this November, self-proclaiming as "the first international platform on architecture and urbanism of the Global South."

Lahoud, who is also Dean of the School of Architecture at the Royal College of Art, has defined the theme for the inaugural edition —Rights of Future Generations— as an instance to "question how inheritance, legacy, and the state of the environment are passed from one generation to the next, how present decisions have long-term intergenerational consequences, and how other expressions of co-existence, including indigenous ones, might challenge dominant western perspectives."

ArchDaily Topics - July: Resilience in Architecture

02:30 - 7 July, 2019
ArchDaily Topics - July: Resilience in Architecture

Resilience has become increasingly common in our vocabulary when we talk about people, buildings, cities or even whole societies overcoming all kind of problems. In fact, Google searches related to resilience have continued to grow since 2004 in English, Spanish, and Portuguese.

Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example

07:00 - 5 July, 2019
Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example, © Carolina Barría Kemp, under license <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt
© Carolina Barría Kemp, under license CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt

Chile is a country used to natural disasters as much as to the reconstruction process. However, the frequency of these cycles has increased over the years. According to the Ministry of Interior (Homeland), 43% of all natural disasters recorded in Chile since 1960 happened between 2014 and 2017. In fact, the government is already involved in several reconstruction processes across the country.

Designed by Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos, Kaukari Urban Park turned the channel of the Copiapó River into an accessible urban green space, capable of controling potential floods, just as it happened in 2015. Image © Rodrigo Opazo Designed by Sebastian Irarrázaval, the Constitución Public Library was part of a public-private initiative taken to rebuild the city of Constitución after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Felipe Díaz Contardo Designed by PLAN Arquitectos, Constitución's Consistorial Town Hall was part of the reconstruction of the city after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Pablo Blanco Villa Verde Housing / ELEMENTAL. Image © Suyin Chia + 7

When is Architecture Day?

07:00 - 2 July, 2019
When is Architecture Day?, En 1937 the architects from the University of Chile featured a hat to recognize as architects. Image © Revista CA
En 1937 the architects from the University of Chile featured a hat to recognize as architects. Image © Revista CA

In 1996, at the International Union of Architects Congress held in Barcelona, Spain, the organization established that World Architecture Day should coincide with UN-Habitat's World Habitat Day. Therefore, the first Monday of October we celebrate our commitment as architects to our society and our cities.

Nevertheless, some countries around the world kept their national celebrations, highlighting their local milestones, as it happens across Latin America. Did you know Brazil celebrates Architecture Day in December paying homage to Oscar Niemeyer's birthday?

In chronological order, these countries celebrate Architecture Day on the following dates:

What's Pushing Refurbishment Fever in China?

06:30 - 25 June, 2019
What's Pushing Refurbishment Fever in China?, Miniature Beijing: the Conversion of No. 28 Dayuan Hu Tong / Atelier Li Xinggang. Image © Shengliang Su
Miniature Beijing: the Conversion of No. 28 Dayuan Hu Tong / Atelier Li Xinggang. Image © Shengliang Su

China seems to be at the peak of a refurbishment fever. Not only hutongs in historic downtowns, but abandoned industrial factories are becoming new tech or cultural hubs, and even buildings in the risk of collapse are refurbished to extend their lifespan. Why is this happening? Who is investing? How could this happen in a country where you cannot buy properties?

In this edition of Editor's Talk, our editors from ArchDaily China share their thoughts on how in a fast-paced development process, such as the one China is going through, there is a refurbishment fever in its biggest cities.

These Are The 20 Most Livable Cities in Latin America in 2019

04:00 - 31 May, 2019
These Are The 20 Most Livable Cities in Latin America in 2019, © byvalet / Shutterstock. ImageMontevideo, Uruguay
© byvalet / Shutterstock. ImageMontevideo, Uruguay

Vienna, Austria has been ranked as the city with the best quality of life in the world for ten consecutive years. The ranking made by multinational consultancy Mercer is dominated by Western European cities in the highest positions, while Vancouver, Canada reached third place, becoming the highest-ranking city in North America for the last 10 years.

7 Projects Announced as Winners of 2019 Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards

16:58 - 3 May, 2019
7 Projects Announced as Winners of 2019 Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards, Winning projects of 2019 Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards. Image Courtesy of Archiprix
Winning projects of 2019 Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards. Image Courtesy of Archiprix

321 graduation projects designed by 407 young architects, landscape architects and urban designers were submitted for the 2019 Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards. Among 22 finalists announced in December 2018, an international jury selected 7 winning projects which spotlight international trends in architecture, urban design and landscape architecture.

Public Spaces Aren't Really Available for Everyone

07:00 - 3 May, 2019
Public Spaces Aren't Really Available for Everyone, World-recognized Shibuya crosswalk in Tokyo, Japan. Image © Sean Pavone
World-recognized Shibuya crosswalk in Tokyo, Japan. Image © Sean Pavone

When we talk about public space, we often imagine a park with happy, relaxed people on a sunny day. In actuality, this is a very restricted approach. A young woman does not cross a deserted street at dawn in the same way as a white man wearing a suit or as an immigrant who may not be welcomed by local citizens. Have you ever felt discriminated while visiting a public space?

In this edition of Editors’ Talk, editors from Los Angeles, São Paulo, Argentina, and Uruguay share their views on defining public spaces for everyone

The World's Most Liveable Cities in 2019

07:30 - 8 April, 2019
The World's Most Liveable Cities in 2019, Strandbar Herrmann. Vienna, Austria. Image © Christian Stemper, via Vienna Tourist Board
Strandbar Herrmann. Vienna, Austria. Image © Christian Stemper, via Vienna Tourist Board

For ten consecutive years, Vienna ranks first in the Mercer survey on cities with the best quality of life in the world. In this edition to the global ranking, eight Western European cities join the top ten, even when "trade tensions and populist undercurrents continue to dominate the global economic climate", as Mercer points out in its report.

Why Do Architects Love Designing Houses?

04:00 - 25 March, 2019
Why Do Architects Love Designing Houses?, © <a href="//commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Euelbenul&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1">User:Euelbenul</a> - <span>Own work</span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>, <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51360903">Link</a>. ImageFallingwater House, iconic project designed by Frank Lloyd Wright back in 1939
© User:Euelbenul - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link. ImageFallingwater House, iconic project designed by Frank Lloyd Wright back in 1939

Home. Our shelter. Our private space. In an urbanized world with dense megalopolises like Tokyo, Shanghai, and São Paulo, homes are getting smaller and more expensive than ever. If you are claustrophobic, Marie Kondo is your best ally in the quest to earn some extra space.  And even though private backyards have become a luxury for most, our data shows that single-family houses are still the most popular project type on ArchDaily. Why is this? (Especially when it seems incongruous given the reality of today’s crowded cities.) Why do some universities still insist on designing and building houses as academic exercises? Wouldn’t it be more creative—and more useful—to develop architecture in small-scale spaces? Would it be more rewarding to develop solutions on bigger scales?

From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles

05:30 - 14 March, 2019
From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles, Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban
Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban

Back in 2008, ArchDaily embarked on a challenging mission: to provide inspiration, knowledge, and tools to the architects tasked with designing cities. In an effort to further align our strategy with these challenges, we recently introduced monthly themes in order to dig deeper into topics we find relevant in today’s architectural discourse. From architects who don't design to reframing climate change as a global issue, we are celebrating our 11th birthday by asking 11 editors and curators to choose ArchDaily's most inspiring articles.

50 AutoCAD Commands You Should Know

08:30 - 13 March, 2019

After spending countless hours in front of AutoCAD working on a project, you’re bound to have your own set of favorite commands to standardize a few steps. We also bet that you don’t have them all memorized or often forget them. To help you remember, we've made a list of 50 commands that can help you speed up your work game, discover new shortcuts, or come in use as a handy tool for when you forget what the command you need is called.

The following listing was developed and corroborated by our team for the 2013, 2014 and 2015 versions of AutoCAD in English. We also prepared a series of GIFs to visualize some of the trickier ones.

When you’ve finished reading, we would love to know what your favorite commands are (including those that we didn’t include). We will use your input to help us update the article!

Why Arata Isozaki won the Pritzker Prize 2019

09:32 - 7 March, 2019

Named 2019 Pritzker Prize Laureate, Japanese architect Arata Isozaki is incredibly prolific and influential among his contemporaries. Deeply aligned with the period of change and reinvention that Japan experimented after Second World War and Allied Occupation, Isozaki has developed a solid career on a truly global scale, avoiding being labeled in a specific style throughout his life.

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

14:00 - 3 March, 2019
Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?, Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize
Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

The award is an initiative funded by Jay Pritzker through the Hyatt Foundation, an organization associated with the hotel company of the same name that Jay founded with his brother Donald in 1957. The award was first given in 1979, when the American architect Philip Johnson, was awarded for his iconic works such as the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut.

The Pritzker Prize has been awarded for almost forty straight years without interruption, and there are now 18 countries with at least one winning architect. To date, half of the winners are European; while the Americas, Asia, and Oceania share the other twenty editions. So far, no African architect has been awarded, making it the only continent without a winner.

Why Keep Drawing When Digital Tools Deliver Hyperrealistic Images?

07:00 - 25 February, 2019
Why Keep Drawing When Digital Tools Deliver Hyperrealistic Images?, Moon Hoon's ilustration of KPOP Curve in South Korea. Image © Moon Hoon
Moon Hoon's ilustration of KPOP Curve in South Korea. Image © Moon Hoon

Starting this month, ArchDaily has introduced monthly themes that we’ll explore in our stories, posts and projects. We began this month with Architectural Representation: from Archigram to Instagram; from napkins sketching to real-time-sync VR models; from academic lectures to storytellers.

It isn’t particularly novel or groundbreaking to say that the internet, social media, and design apps have challeged the relation between representation and building. A year ago we predicted that "this is just the beginning of a new stage of negotiation between the cold precision of technology and the expressive quality inherent in architecture". But, is it? Would you say digital tools are betraying creativity? This is an older dilemma than you think.

In this new edition of our Editor's Talk, four editors and curators at ArchDaily discuss drawings as pieces of art, posit why nobody cares about telephone poles on renders and explore how the building itself is becoming a type of representation.

In 'Ugly Lies the Bone' (2018), Es Devlin created a scenario that allowed the audience to look through a VR set as part of the presentation of the play. Image © Es Devlin On 'HYPER-REALITY', a short film (2016), Keiichi Matsuda envisions the aftermath of life in a city highly saturated by augmented reality, where the streets display a completely new layer of representation. Image © Keiichi Matsuda fala atelier's collage for House In Rua do Paraíso in Portugal. Image © fala atelier Google Dublin. Image © Peter Wurmli + 9