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Patrik Schumacher

New Exhibition Highlights the Best Unbuilt Works by Zaha Hadid Architects

12:30 - 14 September, 2017
New Exhibition Highlights the Best Unbuilt Works by Zaha Hadid Architects, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

Now on display at the Jaroslav Fragner Gallery as part of the third Prague Experimental Architecture Biennial is “ZHA: Unbuilt,” an in-depth look into some of the firm’s best projects that could have been.

Arranged within the space by typological concepts (towers, atriums, stadiums, shells, masterplans, ribbons, and bubbles), the exhibition serves as an exploration into the evolution of the work of Zaha Hadid Architects, showing how earlier research and innovations have become the foundations of the firm's architectural projects currently in development.

© Jiri Straka, eabiennial.cz, gjf.cz © Jiri Straka, eabiennial.cz, gjf.cz © Jiri Straka, eabiennial.cz, gjf.cz © Jiri Straka, eabiennial.cz, gjf.cz + 15

UIA 2017 Seoul World Architects Congress

22:29 - 12 April, 2017
UIA 2017 Seoul World Architects Congress, http://www.uia2017seoul.org
http://www.uia2017seoul.org

The UIA (International Union of Architects) world congresses are a premier forum for professionals and future leaders in the field of architecture to exchange the best and latest practices, visions and first-hand experience. The UIA 2017 Seoul, in particular, will promote various innovative architectural techniques and technologies among member sections and global citizens. In doing so, academic programs, exhibitions, competitions, student activities, and public outreach programs will simultaneously take place.

 

Zaha Hadid Architects Creates Immersive Digital Installation for Samsung at Milan Design Week

11:30 - 4 April, 2017
Zaha Hadid Architects Creates Immersive Digital Installation for Samsung at Milan Design Week, © Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
© Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects has collaborated with Samsung and digital art and design collective Universal Everything to create an immersive technology installation at the 2017 Milan Design Week, taking place this week in the Italian city. Named ‘Unconfined,’ the pavilion will showcase Samsung’s new Galaxy S8 smartphone by leading visitors through an immersive environment inspired by the device.

© Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects © Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects © Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects © Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects + 4

The Miraculous Zaha Hadid: A Tribute by Patrik Schumacher

04:00 - 31 March, 2017
The Miraculous Zaha Hadid: A Tribute by Patrik Schumacher, © José Tomás Franco
© José Tomás Franco

It was in 1988, at London’s Tate Gallery during the Deconstructivism conference held in anticipation of MoMA’s eponymous exhibition that I first encountered Zaha Hadid in person. She was lecturing among her six co-exhibitors: Peter Eisenman, Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry, Wolf Prix, Bernard Tschumi, and Daniel Libeskind. I had encountered her work a few years earlier as a young architecture student (at Stuttgart University) and was stunned and thrilled by the unprecedented degrees of compositional freedom, versatility and dynamism in her work. Up until then I had not been so sure if architecture was such a good career choice for me. I was rather underwhelmed and bored by architecture but, through my encounter with Zaha’s incredible work, architectural design unexpectedly transformed into an adventure. The bounds of architectural possibilities had shifted. Thirty years later, this sense of adventure continues. Zaha changed our field and changed everything for me.

Zaha Hadid Leaves Net Fortune of £67 Million

10:15 - 18 January, 2017
Zaha Hadid Leaves Net Fortune of £67 Million, Dame Zaha Hadid. Image © Brigitte Lacombe
Dame Zaha Hadid. Image © Brigitte Lacombe

As reported by The Guardian and the Architects' Journal, the last will and testament of the late Zaha Hadid—who passed away in March 2016 aged 65—has revealed that the Dame of the British Empire and Principal of Zaha Hadid Architects had a net fortune of £67,249,458 (around $82.5million or €77million). This sum, which was filed in the UK High Court in December last year, will be bequeathed in small parts to nieces and nephews (£1.7million), her brother Haytham Hadid (£0.5million), and her business partner Patrik Schumacher (£0.5million). At the time of her death, Hadid was unmarried with no children.

Zaha Hadid Architects Responds to Patrik Schumacher's "Urban Policy Manifesto"

08:05 - 29 November, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects Responds to Patrik Schumacher's "Urban Policy Manifesto", Courtesy of ZHA
Courtesy of ZHA

On Thursday 17th of November, at the World Architecture Festival in Berlin, Patrik Schumacher gave a lecture offering his theory on how to address London’s Housing crisis. Given Schumacher’s well-known penchant for neoliberal economics, it was perhaps little surprise that his plan included a number of highly controversial ideas, such as the elimination of all forms of social housing and planning, and the privatization of all public space—with Schumacher highlighting Hyde Park as a particularly interesting opportunity.

Though ArchDaily was in attendance at the lecture, we chose not to cover Schumacher’s speech, at least in part because the audible boos from the crowd indicated that this was not a position that the wider architectural profession was interested in giving publicity to. However, the news was picked up by a number of other architectural publications including Dezeen; as a result, Schumacher’s speech became front page news on the London Evening Standard, prompting a response from London Mayor Sadiq Khan who said Schumacher’s ideas were “out of touch” and “just plain wrong.” These developments in turn have prompted an outcry from the architectural profession, causing Zaha Hadid Architects to write an open letter in response to the furore. Read on to see the full letter.

Update [05 January 2017]: the Architects' Journal have published a leaked internal email from Patrik Schumacher which claims that "this letter was sent out by ZHA’s head of press, Roger Howie, without the authorisation of any of the company’s directors."

Watch Harvard GSD Celebrate Zaha Hadid in this Discussion Including Patrik Schumacher and Elia Zenghelis

09:30 - 27 November, 2016

In October, the Harvard Graduate School of Design (Harvard GSD) hosted “Zaha Hadid: A Celebration,” an evening of presentations and discussion around the extraordinary work and life of the late Zaha Hadid. Six months on from Hadid’s sudden passing in March, the Dean of Harvard GSD, Mohsen Mostafavi, introduced the event as the appropriate time to focus on creative recognition and “an evening of incredible celebration and enjoyment.”

Zaha Hadid's Successor Patrick Schumacher Discusses Parametricism in Architecture and Fashion

12:00 - 1 October, 2016
Zaha Hadid's Successor Patrick Schumacher Discusses Parametricism in Architecture and Fashion, Images by: Virgile Simon Bertrand, Owencn_95, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects, Thomas Mayer, Khoo Guo Jie
Images by: Virgile Simon Bertrand, Owencn_95, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects, Thomas Mayer, Khoo Guo Jie

As Zaha Hadid’s successor and current leader of the firm, Schumacher relays a host of opinions, including those on parametricism, which he deems the “architectural style of capitalism.” The term describes the avant-garde practice that uses digital animation to create equations for designs. Patrik Schumacher, who coined this term in 2008, believes this style extracts doubt from the design process, relying instead on the infallibility of science.

Peter Cook, Patrik Schumacher Lead List of Speakers at WAF 2016

11:30 - 12 August, 2016
Peter Cook, Patrik Schumacher Lead List of Speakers at WAF 2016, via World Architecture Festival
via World Architecture Festival

The program for the 2016 edition of the World Architecture Festival (WAF) has been announced. Being held from November 16-18 at the Arena Berlin, Germany, the festival will feature 3 days and 4 nights of events including conferences, lectures and seminars, architect-led city tours and networking opportunities, as well as live critiques of the 411 projects shortlisted for the 2016 WAF Awards. An all-star list of speakers will include leading architectural figures such as Patrik Schumacher, Ole Scheeren and Peter Cook.

This theme of this year’s festival is “Housing For Everyone.” Inspired by a variety of influences, markedly the condition of displaced communities of political and disaster refugees, lectures will focus on “the growing understanding of how demographics and global urbanization are forcing change; and the imperatives to create shelter at one end of the spectrum, and sufficiency for occupation and investment at the other.”

Critical Round-Up: Did Aravena's 2016 Venice Biennale Achieve its Lofty Goals?

10:30 - 27 June, 2016
Critical Round-Up: Did Aravena's 2016 Venice Biennale Achieve its Lofty Goals?, The "Reporting the Front" exhibition/ curated by Alejandro Aravena at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
The "Reporting the Front" exhibition/ curated by Alejandro Aravena at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The XV International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale opened its doors last month. Under the directorship of Chilean Pritzker Prize-winner Alejandro Aravena, “Reporting the front” asked architects to go beyond “business as usual” and investigate concealed built environments – conflict zones and urban slums, as well as locations suffering from housing shortage, migrations and environmental disasters. Clearly, the aim of this Biennale is to open the profession to new fields of engagement and share knowledge on how to improve people’s quality of life.

This stance that has been highly criticized by Patrik Schumacher, director of Zaha Hadid Architectswho believes that architects “are not equipped to [address these issues]. It’s not the best value for our expertise.” But is this a view shared by the rest of the design world and its critics? What are the limits and benefits of this “humanitarian architecture”? Read on to find out critics’ comments.

The "Reporting the Front" exhibition/ curated by Alejandro Aravena at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Gabinete de Arquitectura at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu NLÉ's Makoko Floating School at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu "OUR AMAZON FRONTLINE" / curated by Sandra Barclay and Jean Pierre Crousse. Peruvian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 6

Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid

09:30 - 22 May, 2016
Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid, Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture
Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture

In their semester-long project at Zaha Hadid’s final studio course at the Yale School of Architecture, students Lisa Albaugh, Benjamin Bourgoin, Jamie Edindjiklian, Roberto Jenkins and Justin Oh envisioned a new a high density mixed-use project for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard, the largest undeveloped piece of land still existing in central London.

Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture + 17

Coup De Grâce

04:00 - 19 April, 2016
Coup De Grâce, City of London. Image © Jason Hawkes
City of London. Image © Jason Hawkes

The following article was first published by Volume Magazine in their 47th issue, The System*. You can read the Editorial of this issue, How Much Does Your System Weigh?here.

Neoliberal post-fordism poses a dramatic challenge to urbanism as we have come to know it since the early 20th century. The public planning process has become more and more an embarrassment and obstacle to urban and economic flourishing. It’s a relic of a bygone era. The high point of urban planning was the post-war era of socialist planning and re-construction of the built environment. With respect to this period we can speak about physical or perhaps ‘positive planning’, in the sense of governments formulating concrete plans and designs about what to build. This era has long gone as society evolved beyond the simple fordist society of mechanical mass production to our current post-fordist networked society. When a few basic standards were functionally separate, optimized and endlessly repeated, central planning could still cope with the pace of societal progress. The world we live in today is far too multi-faceted, complex and dynamic to be entrusted to a central planning agency. The old model broke apart as it could not handle the level of complexity we live with and our cities should accommodate. The decentralized information processing mechanism of the market was indeed capable of managing such levels of complexity and, for this reason, has effectively taken over all positive decision-making processes.

A Parametric Devotion: Patrik Schumacher Discusses "Architecture and Freedom" at the Royal Academy

16:00 - 7 November, 2015

For its fall season of architecture events, the Royal Academy’s working theme is “Architecture and Freedom: a changing connection,” in a program conceived and organized by Architecture Programme Curator, Owen Hopkins. One of these events was a recent lecture by Patrik Schumacher, Director of Zaha Hadid Architects, and ardent promoter of Parametricism. In his lecture, what starts out with a brief exercise in damage control over the barrage of criticism recently endured by the firm, emerges as an impassioned discussion of architectural politics, design philosophies, and social imperatives.

Design Liberland: Competition Seeks to Masterplan New European Micronation

12:45 - 20 October, 2015
Design Liberland: Competition Seeks to Masterplan New European Micronation, Liberland Flag. Image © Liberland
Liberland Flag. Image © Liberland

In April, the world's "third smallest sovereign state" was established: Liberland. Established on a small patch of unclaimed land created by the border dispute between Croatia and Serbia, the new country founded on the principles of libertarianism is currently battling for international recognition - although as reported by The New York Times Magazine in August, this remains a steep uphill struggle. In spite of these challenges, the European micronation is seeking ideas through a global design competition on how to masterplan its seven-square-kilometer territory. Zaha Hadid Architects' Patrik Schumacher is one of the many experts that have been summoned to judge the proposals, of which aim to establish a "multi-stage" plan that will reflect Liberland's Libertarian and Anarcho-Capitalist values. 

"Rather than purely fantastical or artistic schemes, Liberland seeks radically creative, yet mature proposals for a fertile, high-density city-nation of the 21st century, responsive to its advanced contemporary network society," says the competition brief. 

Critics Take On "The State of the Art of Architecture" in Chicago

09:30 - 9 October, 2015
An image from Iwan Baan's Chicago photo essay. Image © Iwan Baan
An image from Iwan Baan's Chicago photo essay. Image © Iwan Baan

Last week, the Chicago Architecture Biennial opened to over 31,000 visitors and much fanfare, and for good reason - it is the largest architecture event on the continent since the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, featuring over one hundred exhibitors from over thirty countries. With a theme as ambiguous as "The State of the Art of Architecture," and with the hope of making the biennial, according to directors Joseph Grima and Sarah Herda, "a space for debate, dialog and the production of new ideas," the event was sure to generate equally wide-ranging opinions. Read on to find out what the critics had to say about the Biennial.

Patrik Schumacher Actually Makes a Good Point

10:30 - 17 April, 2015
Patrik Schumacher Actually Makes a Good Point, Galaxy Soho. Image © Hufton + Crow
Galaxy Soho. Image © Hufton + Crow

Last week Patrik Schumacher, director at Zaha Hadid Architects and the practice's frontman in the field of architectural theory, took once again to Facebook to disseminate his ideas - this time arguing that "the denunciation of architectural icons and stars is superficial and ignorant." In the post, Schumacher lamented the default position of the architectural media which he believes sees success and reputation as "a red cloth and occasion to knock down icons," going on to outline his beliefs on why stars and icons are useful and even inevitable mechanisms of architectural culture.

Schumacher has made headlines via Facebook before, with a post last year in which he argued for an end to the "moralizing political correctness" that has led to the popularity of socially-conscious design - a post which attracted almost universal outrage from architects, critics and social media users of all stripes. However this latest post had a very different feel; many people, myself included, seemed to find themselves at least partially agreeing with Schumacher. After all, at the most basic level he was asking for designs to each be judged on their individual merits - what's not to like?

Patrik Schumacher: "The Denunciation of Architectural Icons and Stars is Superficial and Ignorant"

09:25 - 10 April, 2015
Patrik Schumacher: "The Denunciation of Architectural Icons and Stars is Superficial and Ignorant", Zaha Hadid Architects' Heydar Aliyev Center. Image © Hufton + Crow
Zaha Hadid Architects' Heydar Aliyev Center. Image © Hufton + Crow

In the latest of his provocative posts on Facebook, Patrik Schumacher has come out in defense of iconic design and star architects, arguing that the current trend of criticism is "superficial and ignorant," and "all-too-easy point-scoring which indeed usually misses the point."

Schumacher says that critics "should perhaps slow down a bit in their (pre-)judgement and reflect on their role as mediators between the discourse of architecture and the interested public." In the 1,400 word post, he goes on to elaborate that so-called icons and the star system are inevitable results of this mediation, adding that "explanation rather than dismissal and substitution should be seen as the critics’ task."

Read on after the break for more highlights from Schumacher's argument

Dear Martha: An Open Letter to the Pritzker Prize Committee

00:00 - 22 January, 2015
Dear Martha: An Open Letter to the Pritzker Prize Committee, Courtesy of Conrad Newel
Courtesy of Conrad Newel

As the Pritzker Jury begins its deliberations for the 2015 Pritzker Prize, this is a critical time of year for shaping the landscape of architectural debate for the coming year and beyond. The following is an open letter to Martha Thorne, the Executive Director of the Pritzker Prize, from Conrad Newel, author of the popular blog Notes on Becoming a Famous Architect.

Dear Martha,

I have to hand it to you and all the people on the Pritzker committee, you guys are a very crafty bunch. Just when I thought I had you all figured out, you have now - even though only slightly - succeeded in confounding me.

From my 2011 analysis of the Pritzker, I figured that your potential pool of laureates was always a very predictable bunch. In fact anyone could look at my data and predict with reasonable certainty that the next laureate would most likely be an Asian or Caucasian male starchitect from Europe, The USA, or Japan. I further pointed out that none of your laureates have done much in the way of humanitarianism, despite the fact that the mission statement of the Pritzker also asks that the recipient should be making significant contributions to humanity. I maintained that this part of the mandate has been consistently overlooked.