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Artist Spencer Finch Evokes Kyoto's Ryoan-ji Garden at the Mies Pavilion

05:00 - 3 October, 2018
Artist Spencer Finch Evokes Kyoto's Ryoan-ji Garden at the Mies Pavilion, © Anna Mas
© Anna Mas

It would be hard to associate zen philosophy with Mies van der Rohe, even harder to associate it with the German Pavilion in Barcelona. Nevertheless, the latest work by American artist Spencer Finch, Fifteen stones (Ryōan-ji), precisely establishes that connection with the iconic pavilion.

Spencer Finch was the latest artist invited to intervene the Fundació's pavilion. With the aim of "provok[ing] new looks and reflections through [his] intervention in the Pavilion, [he] enhanced it as a space for inspiration and experimentation for the most innovative artistic and architectural creation." Finch joined a prominent team of artists and architects, including SANAA, Jeff Wall, Ai Wei Wei, Enric Miralles, Andrés Jaque, and Anna & Eugeni Bach, among others.

© Anna Mas © Anna Mas © Anna Mas © Anna Mas + 10

Chicago Architecture Foundation's New Home, the Chicago Architecture Center, to Open in Late August

14:00 - 30 June, 2018
Chicago Architecture Foundation's New Home, the Chicago Architecture Center, to Open in Late August, Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation
Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation

The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) has announced the opening date for their new home, the Chicago Architecture Center (CAC). Set to open August 31 of this year, the CAC will be the "home to everything architecture in Chicago." The 20,000-square-foot structure is located at 111 East Wacker Drive, just above the dock for the River Cruise offered by the CAF.

Lynn Osmond, the CAF's president and CEO, said of the new Center, "We can't wait for people to visit and experience how Chicago architects have influenced the world through their innovation and vision. We've engineered a stimulating and immersive space where visitors can have fun discovering Chicago's groundbreaking architecture and appreciate its profound impact on the world."

Designed by Chicago-based firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG), the CAC will feature custom spaces designed for education, tour orientation, and other public programs, as well as a store and interactive exhibits.

Read on for more about the Chicago Architecture Center and its unique design experience.

Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation + 7

No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

08:00 - 6 June, 2018
No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

In the ambit of architecture, much of the twentieth century is marked by a production that reads, in general, as modern. The foundations of this work have been the subject of discussion for at least six decades, bringing together conflicting opinions about the true intention behind the modern gestalt.

Spotlight: Mies van der Rohe

07:30 - 27 March, 2018
Spotlight: Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona Pavilion. Image © Gili Merin
Barcelona Pavilion. Image © Gili Merin

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (27 March 1886 – 17 August 1969) is one of the most influential architects of the 20th century, known for his role in the development of the most enduring architectural style of the era: modernism. Born in Aachen, Germany, Mies' career began in the influential studio of Peter Behrens, where Mies worked alongside other two other titans of modernism, Walter Gropius and Le Corbusier. For almost a century, Mies' minimalist style has proved very popular; his famous aphorism "less is more" is still widely used, even by those who are unaware of its origins.

Neue National Gallery in Berlin. Image © Guillermo Hevia García The Farnsworth House. Image © Greg Robbins IBM Building. Image © Bluffton University Seagram Building. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:NewYorkSeagram_04.30.2008.JPG'>Wikimedia user Noroton</a> licensed under public domain + 14

Mies van der Rohe by Edgar Stach

18:00 - 5 February, 2018
Mies van der Rohe by Edgar Stach

It is understood that Mies van der Rohe is one of the most important architects of the Modern movement. But how do Mies’ ideas on architecture and on the logic of construction relate to his built – and sometimes unbuilt – oeuvre? This book investigates this question based on 14 projects, with a focus on the choice of detail and material. Specially produced three-dimensional drawings provide an easy-to-understand analysis of Mies’ construction concepts.

The projects include Lange and Esters Houses (1927–30), Tugendhat House (1928-30), the Barcelona Pavilion (1928-29), Farnsworth House (1946-51), Lake Shore Drive (1948-51) and

8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles

09:30 - 26 January, 2018
8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles, Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/7455207@N05/5491325900/'>Flickr user SBA73</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © Flickr user SBA73 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Throughout history, there have been certain architects whose unique ideas and innovative styles have influenced generations to come. Some of these pioneers introduced ideas so revolutionary that entirely new words had to be invented to truly encapsulate them. Whether they became a style embraced by an entire era, or captured the imagination of millions for decades to come, we know a Gaudiesque or Corbusian building when we see one.

Here are eight adjectives derived from the works of architects whose names are now in the dictionary:

Ronchamp by Le Corbusier. Image via <a href='http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Ronchamp-Snow-Chapel-Notre-dame-You-Skin-De-Ronchamp-372579'>Maxpixel</a> Farnsworth House by Mies Van Der Rohe. Image © Jack E. Boucher <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/il0323/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) Fuente de los Amantes by Luis Barragan. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/esparta/3573608700'>Flickr user esparta</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a> Trinity Church, Boston by Henry Hobson Richardson. Image © Carol M. Highsmith <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/highsm.12234/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) + 9

10 Incredible Works of Architecture Photographed in Fall: The Best Photos of the Week

14:00 - 23 November, 2017
Cortesía de VIPP
Cortesía de VIPP

September 22nd marked the start of fall in the Northern Hemisphere. This season of the year is excellent for architectural photography due to the effects of nature, which delights us with wonderful red and orange foliage. To mark the beginning of this season, we have created a selection of 10 works captured in fall by prominent photographers such as Francisco Nogueira, Jorge López Conde, and Steve Montpetit.

Cortesía de Matter Design + FR|SCH © Roger Frei © Roland Halbe Cortesía de Format Elf Architekten + 11

Architectural Adventures: Detroit—Motor City’s Architectural Revival

15:44 - 16 November, 2017
Architectural Adventures: Detroit—Motor City’s Architectural Revival, WSU McGregor Memorial Conference Center | courtesy of Jeff Dunn
WSU McGregor Memorial Conference Center | courtesy of Jeff Dunn

For most of the 20th century, Detroit was our nation’s economic dynamo. This heritage is reflected in the treasure trove of outstanding historic homes, buildings, and factories that still define the cityscape. While Detroit has struggled into the 21st century, its role as a center for architectural innovation is undiminished. With stunning early 20th-century mansions, grand Art Deco skyscrapers, and surprising mid-century masterpieces, the Motor City has more to offer than most realize. Explore the Cranbrook Academy of Art, Lafayette Park, Eastern Market, private homes, and special projects by local preservation organizations. Learn about how Detroit is rebounding while experiencing the innovative and seminal works of great architects like Eliel Saarinen, Daniel Burnham, Cass Gilbert, John Burgee, Albert Kahn, Minoru Yamasaki, and Mies van der Rohe along the way.

Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion “Dematerialized” With All-White Surfaces

12:00 - 10 November, 2017
Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion “Dematerialized” With All-White Surfaces, © Adrià Goula
© Adrià Goula

Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion is being transformed into a “1:1 scale model” of itself in a new exhibition designed by Anna and Eugeni Bach titled “mies missing materiality.”

Over the next week, the iconic structure – the longest standing temporary pavilion in modern architectural history – will be completely covered with white vinyl, obscuring the beautiful marble, travertine, steel, chrome, and glass for which it is recognized.

The project sets to prompt discussion about the role of material in the original design, as well as the symbolism of the white surface within modern architecture.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula + 6

In "Horizontal City," 24 Architects Reconsider Architectural Interiors at 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

10:20 - 25 September, 2017

Horizontal City is one of two collective exhibitions (the other being Vertical City) at the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial. 24 architects were tasked by artistic directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee to "reconsider the status of the architectural interior" by referencing a photograph of a canonical interior from any time period.

Their challenge was in considering the forms and ways that their selection "might extrapolate out from the cropped photographic frame into a spatial and lifestyle construction across a larger, horizontal site" – in this case, a field of plinths, the size and positioning of which is a direct reference to the footprint of Mies van der Rohe's 1947 plan for the IIT Campus in Chicago.

How an Artist Constructed a Wooden Replica of Mies' Farnsworth House

09:30 - 31 August, 2017
How an Artist Constructed a Wooden Replica of Mies' Farnsworth House, © Pedro Marinello
© Pedro Marinello

In December 2010, Manuel Peralta Lorca completed the work "Welcome Less Is More," a wooden reconstruction of Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House that was installed inside the Patricia Ready Gallery in Santiago, Chile. This September, a new version of this work will be mounted in the hall of Santiago's Museum of Contemporary Art, under the name "Home Less is More."

In the following story, the artist tells us about the process of reinterpreting this icon of modern architecture in wood and how a team of carpenters—who agreed to immerse themselves in the philosophy of Mies—was fundamental to completing the challenge.

Reflections, a Tribute to Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion

08:00 - 24 August, 2017

There is always something new to say about Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion. Sometimes we uncover an unknown detail, other times an intervention is revealed or we discover a new lens to observe it. The latter is the case with Spanish architect and audiovisual creator Fernando Ayuso, who wanted to pay homage to this historical work.

Frieze Art & Architecture Conference

18:53 - 14 August, 2017
Frieze Art & Architecture Conference, The Sackler Courtyard, V&A Exhibition Road Quarter, designed by AL_A ©Hufton+Crow
The Sackler Courtyard, V&A Exhibition Road Quarter, designed by AL_A ©Hufton+Crow

What is the relationship between art and architecture? What makes a great space for art? How do buildings inform what and how we see? Leading architects will be in conversation with museum directors, gallerists and artists to discuss major international projects and the role of architecture in shaping the cultural landscape.

Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About

09:30 - 30 July, 2017

You’re a chipper young first-year student, still soft and tender in the early stages of your induction into the cult of architecture. Apart from fiddling with drafting triangles and furiously scribbling down the newfound jargon that is going to forever change how you communicate, you often find yourself planted in a seat, eyes transfixed to a projector screen as your professor-slash-cult-leader flashes images of the architecture world's masterpieces, patron saints, and divine structures.

Soon, you develop a Pavlovian response: you instinctively recognize these buildings, can name them at once and recite a number of soundbites about their design that have lodged themselves in your brain. Your professor looks on in approval. Since we here at ArchDaily have also partaken in this rite of passage, here are 15 buildings that we all recognize from the rituals of architecture school.

Image in public domain © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/augustfischer/23478735942'>Flickr user augustfischer</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> © Carsten Janssen <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fagus_Gropius_Hauptgebaeude_200705_wiki_front.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/de/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0 DE</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/frans16611/4729750386'>Flickr user frans16611</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 17

A Different Kind of Sharing Economy: How the REAL Foundation is Building Social Equity Into the Nuts and Bolts of Architecture

04:00 - 13 July, 2017
A Different Kind of Sharing Economy: How the REAL Foundation is Building Social Equity Into the Nuts and Bolts of Architecture, Interior design by REAL Foundation for Common Stock: Sharing as Luxury, the fourth tower in the Derivative Architecture series. Image Courtesy of Real Foundation
Interior design by REAL Foundation for Common Stock: Sharing as Luxury, the fourth tower in the Derivative Architecture series. Image Courtesy of Real Foundation

The Chicago Architecture Biennial is the largest platform for contemporary architecture in North America, and the blog invites designers and other contributors to express their perspectives in a range of formats. The 2017 exhibition, entitled Make New History, will be free and open to the public between September 16, 2017 and January 6, 2018.

Courtesy of Real Foundation
Courtesy of Real Foundation

Chicago Architecture Biennial (CAB): We want to start by noting that REAL foundation, which stands for "Real Estate Architecture Laboratory," is not a typical design practice. You design spaces, but you also make books, exhibitions, a magazine, and tools for advocacy. Why?

Jack Self (JS): The REAL foundation is an unusual model for an architectural firm. We're a normal architectural practice, but we are governed by a very strict set of conditions that allow us to pursue certain political and economic ideologies. We see the social role of the architect, as well as the structure of the architectural firm, as a subject for design as much as buildings.

The Ingot, a proposal by the REAL Foundation for The Ingot, a gold-plated tower sited next to London Bridge, and designed to house low-paid, precarious workers. Image Courtesy of Real Foundation Interior view of Default Grey, a proposal for a domestic tower that provides inhabitants autonomy from debt and enough anonymity to shield them from surveillance. Image Courtesy of Real Foundation Installation view of Home Economics, the British Pavilion curated by Jack Self with Finn Williams and Shumi Bose at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Each room in the pavilion addressed a different facet of the contemporary crisis of living. Photo by Cristiano Corte. Image Courtesy of Real Foundation Installation view of Home Economics, the British Pavilion curated by Jack Self with Finn Williams and Shumi Bose at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Each room in the pavilion addressed a different facet of the contemporary crisis of living. Photo by Cristiano Corte. Image Courtesy of Real Foundation + 6

Mies van der Rohe's Other Illinois Home, the McCormick House, to Undergo Restoration

16:05 - 3 July, 2017
Mies van der Rohe's Other Illinois Home, the McCormick House, to Undergo Restoration, © Heritage Architecture Studio, LLC and LP Studio Inc. Via Curbed
© Heritage Architecture Studio, LLC and LP Studio Inc. Via Curbed

As Mies van der Rohe’s adopted city, Chicago and its surrounding area are home to more of the Modernist architect’s projects than anywhere else in the world, from Crown Hall to Federal Center to the Farnsworth House. Perhaps for that very reason, the McCormick House, located in the Chicago suburb of Elmhurst, is one of the lesser known projects in the architect's’ oeuvre – despite being one of just three single-family homes in the United States completed by Mies.

Built in 1952 for Robert McCormick Jr. – the owner of the land where Mies' 860-880 N. Lake Shore Drive was constructed – the house was moved down the street in 1994, where it was attached to the newly built Elmhurst Museum of Art via a 15-foot-long corridor. While its relocation allowed the building to remain in good care over the next 23 years, it also obscured the home’s front facade, “camouflaging one of the most prized objects in the museum's collection.”

But that’s all about to change, thanks to an upcoming restoration that will remove the offending corridor, allowing the original architecture to shine once again.

Francine Houben on Washington D.C.'s Central Library, A Balancing Act Between Mies and Martin Luther King Jr.

10:30 - 23 June, 2017
© GSAPP Conversations
© GSAPP Conversations

In the tenth episode of GSAPP Conversations, Jorge Otero-Pailos (Director of the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia GSAPP) speaks with Francine Houben, founder and creative director of the Dutch practice Mecanoo. Recorded before the school's annual Paul S. Byard Memorial Lecture, their conversation centers on her practice's work to renovate and redevelop the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington D.C., Mies van der Rohe's last building and only library project.

Inside the Bizarre Personal Lives of Famous Architects

09:30 - 29 May, 2017
Inside the Bizarre Personal Lives of Famous Architects, From left: © Robert C. Lautman; <a href='http://https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Alvar_Aalto1.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain); Photograph by Al Ravenna <a href='http://https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
From left: © Robert C. Lautman; via Wikimedia (public domain); Photograph by Al Ravenna via Wikimedia (public domain)

Famous architects are often seen as more enigma than person, but behind even the biggest names hide the scandals and tragedies of everyday life. As celebrities of a sort, many of the world's most famed architects have faced rumors and to this day there are questions about the truth of their private affairs. Clients and others in their studios would get a glimpse into an architect’s personal life, but sometimes the sheer force of personality that often comes with creative genius would prevent much insight. The fact remains, however, that these architects’ lives were more than the sum of their buildings.