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Exhibition / Conceptions of Space: Recent Acquisitions in Contemporary Architecture

Focusing on recent acquisitions in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design, Conceptions of Space addresses how contemporary architects continue to embrace spatial creation as a fundamental focus of their work. The exhibition reveals how, beyond formal traits and functional needs, the conception and articulation of architectural space still defines architecture as an artistic endeavor, and a response to wider cultural issues.

Prodigy Network Announces Winners of 17John Crowdsourcing Competition

Prodigy Network have selected the winners of the crowdsourcing design competitions for their 17John 'Cotel' in New York, including winners for the design of the public interior spaces and the private rooms. The Cotel concept is intended to meet the changing needs of the modern business traveler; providing living spaces somewhere between a long-term apartment and a short term hotel, but also flexible spaces that can be used for work and meetings.

The crowdsourced competitions were run via Prodigy Network's Design Lab website, and judging was conducted with a mixture of public voting and jury selection. "The winners of the 17John competition were intuitive to the needs of travelers, creative in the interactive spaces and understood the function of extended stay residences," said Prodigy Network Founder Rodrigo Nino. Read on after the break to see the winning proposals.

Public Space Winner: HUB / Pierre Levesque (Co-Working area). Image Courtesy of Prodigy Network Public Space Winner: HUB / Pierre Levesque (Lobby). Image Courtesy of Prodigy Network Private space winner: 'Weco, the Nomadic Company" / Vianney Lacotte. Image Courtesy of Prodigy Network Public Space Winner: HUB / Pierre Levesque (Co-Working area). Image Courtesy of Prodigy Network

David Adjaye's Sugar Hill Development: A New Typology for Affordable Housing

Adjaye Associates' latest development has opened in the historic neighborhood of Harlem, New York: a complex that aims to combat poverty and revitalize the community by bringing together affordable housing (including housing for homeless New Yorkers), a Preschool, and a 17,000 square foot cultural institution -  the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling. The “school in a museum” is designed to engage students and foster a new generation of Sugar Hill artists and innovators.

“The Sugar Hill Development is a new typology for affordable housing, with its mixed program of museum space, community facilities, offices and apartments,” David Adjaye noted at yesterday's opening press conference, “My hope is that the building—perched high on Coogan’s Bluff—will offer a symbol of civic pride and be a valued new resource for the neighborhood.”

The architect's description of the project, after the break.

Frick Collection to Expand With New 6 Story Gallery

Yesterday the Frick Collection announced its plans for a 6-story extension to its gallery in New York, designed by Davis Brody Bond. This article by Robin Pogrebin in the New York Times outlines the details of the extension, as the Frick adds itself to the list of post-recession cultural building projects - a list which includes the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and Miami's Pérez Art Museum. The article also outlines the challenges the Frick will have in expanding its landmarked 1914 building. Read the article in full here.

Sugar Hill Development / Adjaye Associates

  • Architects: Adjaye Associates
  • Location: Harlem, New York, NY, USA
  • Area: 191000.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Adjaye Associates

Courtesy of Adjaye Associates Courtesy of Adjaye Associates Courtesy of Adjaye Associates Courtesy of Adjaye Associates

Revised Renovation Plan Released for New York Public Library

Details have been released on the New York Public Library’s (NYPL) plan to renovate its Mid-Manhattan branch, while creating more public space within its flagship Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. The news comes shortly after Foster + Partner’s redesign of the the Beaux-Arts landmark was scrapped due to concerns of a ballooning budget. The revised $300 million overhaul suggests a more affordable option of relocating Schwarzman’s main stacks beneath Bryant Park, while establishing a more campus-like connection with a fully renovated Mid-Manhattan branch. All the details, here

Proposal for New York Skyscraper Cantilevers Lobby Over Its Neighbors

The typical skyscraper is a nondescript tower constructed of a steel frame and glass curtain wall. Architects from the firm Fundamental are challenging this convention with “New York Tomorrow,” a proposal that earned them a runner-up place in Metropolis Magazine’s Living Cities Competition. This progressive design weds revolutionary structural technology with a unique programmatic layout to draw people from all walks of life to the city of New York.

Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility / Selldorf Architects

  • Architects: Selldorf Architects
  • Location: Brooklyn, NY, USA
  • Area: 140000.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Nikolas Koenig, Marc Lins, Jonathan Chesley, John Majors

© Marc Lins © Jonathan Chesley © Nikolas Koenig © Nikolas Koenig

Exhibition / Knud Lonberg-Holm: The Invisible Architect

Ubu Gallery is pleased to present Knud Lonberg-Holm: The Invisible Architect, a debut exhibition devoted to this overlooked, yet highly influential, 20th Century modernist. Never-before-seen photographs, architectural drawings, letters, graphic design, and ephemera from Lonberg-Holm’s remarkably diverse career will be on view through August 1, 2014. The exhibition, which consists of selections from the extensive archive assembled by architectural historian Marc Dessauce, will solidify the importance of this emblematic figure in early 20th Century cultural and architectural history. Metropolis Magazine, the national publication of architecture and design, will publish an article on Knud Lonberg-Holm to coincide with this groundbreaking exhibition.

Exhibition / Open to the Public: Civic Space Now

This summer, the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (AIANY) and the Center for Architecture Foundation will present Open to the Public: Civic Space Now, an exhibition exploring why people gravitate to (or avoid) civic spaces – the places between buildings where people can assemble. Curated by Thomas Mellins and designed by Athletics, the exhibition opens Thursday, June 12, 6:00 PM and runs through Saturday, September 6 in the main galleries at the Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place. 

Exhibition: World’s Fairs / Lost Utopias

In celebration of the 50-year anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Onishi Project and Kipton Cronkite are pleased to present World’s Fairs: Lost Utopias, the debut exhibition of Jade Doskow’s groundbreaking 7-year photography project. The exhibition will also include a 1968 triptych by Robert Rauschenberg and a dynamic group show---featuring Alexandra Posen, Greg Haberny, Naomi Reis, and Mark Freedman--- inspired by the cultural zeitgeist that surrounded this event.

Conference: Social Housing in Spain

Social Housing in Spain is intended to be the first of a series of international programs by the AIANY Housing Committee, highlighting exemplary housing design around the world. For the first program of the series, AIANY have invited three leading architects from Spain who are currently teaching in the tri-state area: Carmen Espegel, Iñaqui Carnicero, and María Hurtado de Mendoza. The panelists will present and comment upon innovative projects that follow the country’s strong social commitment to housing.

Apple Taps Bohlin Cywinski Jackson to Revamp Historic NYC Building

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and Eckersley O'Callagha, both longstanding collaborators of Apple’s flagship stores, has been commissioned to transform a 93-year-old former United States Mortgage and Trust Company building on Madison Avenue into the chain’s next New York City store. Though little has been released about the design, the store’s grand opening is planned for 2015. More information can be found here

Request for Proposals: The Energetic City / Connectivity in the Public Realm

The Design Trust for Public Space announces The Energetic City: Connectivity in the Public Realm, a new request for project proposals to redefine public space. 

Critical Round-Up: The September 11 Memorial Museum

Set to open to the public on Wednesday after a highly controversial and contested journey from idea to reality, the September 11 Memorial Museum has inevitably been a talking point among critics this week. The museum by Davis Brody Bond occupies the space between the Memorial Plaza at ground level and the bedrock below, with an angular glass pavilion by Snøhetta providing an entrance from above. A long ramp, designed to recall the access ramp with which tons of twisted metal was excavated from the site, descends to the exhibits which sit within the perimeter boundaries of the twin towers' foundations, underneath the suspended volumes of Michael Arad's memorial fountains.

The content of the museum is obviously fraught with painful memories, and the entrance pavilion occupies a privileged position as the only surface level structure ground zero, in opposition to the great voids of the memorial itself. The discussion at the opening of the museum was therefore always going to center on whether the design of the museum - both its built form and the exhibitions contained - were sensitive and appropriate enough for this challenging brief. Read the critics' takes on the results after the break.

AD Classics: World Trade Center / Minoru Yamasaki Associates + Emery Roth & Sons

A New York City icon that once rivaled structures such as the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building, the World Trade Center, colloquially known as the Twin Towers, was one of the most recognized structures in history. Designed by Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki, it held the title of Tallest Building in the World from 1972–1974.  Up until its unfortunate demise, the WTC site was a major destination, accommodating 500,000 working people and 80,000 visitors on a typical weekday.

© Flickr user David Farquhar via Wikipedia Commons via Wikipedia Commons via Wikipedia Commons

NBRS Proposes to Extend High Line Vertically

Exterior View. Image © NBRS + Partners
Exterior View. Image © NBRS + Partners

In response to New York City’s rapidly expanding population, NBRS + Partners has proposed a 40 story tall skyscraper that could help the city embrace its rapidly shifting demographics and size. Entitled “VIVO on High Line,” the adaptable steel-frame tower is essentially the vertical extension of the city’s beloved High Line park. 

“The podium screen engulfs the High Line folding it in and extending the lifeblood into the building base, like capillary action drawing it vertically,” described the team.

New York Public Library Scraps Foster-Designed Renovation Plans

The New York Public Library (NYPL) has abandoned Norman Foster's controversial plans to transform part of its 20th century Carrère and Hastings “masterpiece” into a circulating library. The news doesn’t come as much of a surprise, considering the city’s new mayor, Bill de Blasio expressed skepticism towards the $150 million renovation earlier this year. 

According to a report by the New York Times, Blasio does not intend on reducing the NYPL funding, however the money will now be allocated to other purposes. 

Several library trustees have stated that in order to keep up with the cultural shift from traditional stacks to online resources, they now intend on completing the renovation of the library's mid-Manhattan branch on Fifth Avenue. 

A response from Norman Foster, after the break...