ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

6 Cities That Have Transformed Their Highways Into Urban Parks

08:00 - 1 December, 2016
6 Cities That Have Transformed Their Highways Into Urban Parks, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

Building a highway in a city is often thought of as a solution to traffic congestion. However, the induced demand theory has shown that when drivers have more routes, they choose to continue using this medium instead of using public transport or a bicycle, and as a result, congestion doesn’t decrease.

As a result, some cities have chosen to remove spaces designated for cars and turn what was once a highway into urban parks and less congested streets. 

Here we have six examples, some have already been completed, while a few are still under construction. To the surprise of some, most of the projects are in the US, which reflects that American designers are looking into further studying European transport policies. 

Time for Play: Why Architecture Should Take Happiness Seriously

03:00 - 28 September, 2016
Time for Play: Why Architecture Should Take Happiness Seriously, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

Over the last 15 years AZC’s architectural work has developed through a diverse range of experiences. This book, Time for Play, presents exhibition pavilions, temporary installations, and ideas competitions – a mix of built and unbuilt projects.

Before/After: 20 Images of Buenos Aires' Changing Cityscapes

14:00 - 23 September, 2016

Buenos Aires' contemporary urban landscape as we know it today provides a tempered mix of historical and recent construction projects. As one of the most beautiful cities in South America, it's wide boulevards and grand buildings, based on European models, have morphed to embrace the needs of a modern metropolis. 

These images show just how profoundly time affects our cities (and how centuries-old foliage can powerfully transform spatial perception).  

Browse the 20 interactive images of Buenos Aires before and after. 

Why Current Sustainability Metrics Are Short-Changing Non-Western Cities

09:30 - 9 September, 2016
Why Current Sustainability Metrics Are Short-Changing Non-Western Cities, The High Line in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Amenities such as greenways are good for sustainability on a local level, but they have negative effects on a wider level that most cities fail to measure. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)
The High Line in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Amenities such as greenways are good for sustainability on a local level, but they have negative effects on a wider level that most cities fail to measure. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)

This article was originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "When It Comes to Sustainability, We're Ranking Our Cities Wrong."

A recent article published in Nature makes a bold claim: we're analyzing our cities completely wrong. Professors David Wachsmuth, Aldana Cohen, and Hillary Angelo argue that, for too long, we have defined sustainability too narrowly, only looking at environmental impact on a neighborhood or city scale rather than a regional or global scale. As a result, we have measured our cities in ways that are inherently biased towards wealthy cities, and completely ignored the negative impacts our so-called "sustainable," post-industrial cities have on the rest of the world.Metropolis editor Vanessa Quirk spoke with Professor Wachsmuth to learn more about the unintended knock-on effects of going "green," the importance of consumption-based carbon counting, and why policy-makers should be more attentive to the effects of "environmental gentrification."

Watch Almost 6,000 Years of Human Urbanization Unfold Before Your Eyes in This Video

09:40 - 9 July, 2016

From the Cradle of Civilization in ancient Mesopotamia to the modern urban explosion in China, cities are among the most obvious and dramatic evidence of human existence. In a recent paper published in Scientific Data, a team led by Yale University researcher Meredith Reba mapped the emergence of cities between 3,700 BC and 2,000 AD based on when their populations were first recorded in historical accounts.

Taking the data from this study, Max Galka of Metrocosm has produced this fascinating animation showing the history of cities worldwide. "Most datasets available go back only a few years or decades at most. This is the first one I've seen that covers 6 millennia," Galka told CityLab. "I'm a big fan of history, so after reading the study, I thought it would be interesting to visualize the data and see if it offers some perspective." The steady flow of time may seem a little slow at first, but stick with it through the early BC years and the shifts in urban development start to get intriguing. And—spoiler alert—buckle up as you approach the 20th century.

These Are the World's Oldest Cities

14:00 - 14 June, 2016
These Are the World's Oldest Cities, Jericho, Palestinian Territories, 9,000 BC. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User: Dr. Avishai Teicher Pikiwiki Israel licensed under CC BY 3.0
Jericho, Palestinian Territories, 9,000 BC. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User: Dr. Avishai Teicher Pikiwiki Israel licensed under CC BY 3.0

Have you ever wondered which are humanity's oldest cities? Matador Network has compiled a list of the world's ancient metropolises, and perhaps unsurprisingly, nearly all of them are within or adjacent to the Fertile Crescent, a moon-shaped region running from the Persian Gulf through what is today the south of Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and the Nile River Delta in Egypt. With settings that range from hamlets on the road less traveled, like Susa, Iran, and Sidon, Lebanon, to cities that hold international renown as trade and migratory crossroads, like Beirut and Damascus, these places share an ability to endure through the highs and lows of fortune and conflict. This factor of longevity is all the more remarkable considering that the youngest locales date from 3,000 BC and others extend back another 6,000 years.

Find the complete list of cities on Matador Network, here.

Urban95 Challenge: Designing Cities That Support Healthy Child Development

07:00 - 10 June, 2016
Urban95 Challenge: Designing Cities That Support Healthy Child Development, Urban95 Challenge: Designing Cities that support Healthy Child Development
Urban95 Challenge: Designing Cities that support Healthy Child Development

Do you have an idea to improve the lives of young children in cities? How would you organise neighbourhoods, public space, green areas, housing, services and transportation? What else would you change or improve? The Bernard van Leer Foundation will invest in promising small projects that benefit young children in cities from the prenatal period up to the age of five. Applications are open to all organisations and individuals, from any country.

With Recent Innovations, Where Will Elevators Take Us Next?

09:30 - 27 May, 2016
With Recent Innovations, Where Will Elevators Take Us Next?

Many technological advancements have changed the way we design in the past 150 years, but perhaps none has had a greater impact than the invention of the passenger elevator. Prior to Elisha Otis’ design for the elevator safety brake in 1853, buildings rarely reached 7 stories. Since then, buildings have only been growing taller and taller. In 2009, the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, maxed out at 163 floors (serviced by Otis elevators). Though a century and half separates those milestones, in that time elevator technology has actually changed relatively little - until recently.

Monocle 24's The Urbanist: Live (2016)

16:00 - 18 May, 2016
Monocle 24's The Urbanist: Live (2016), The Urbanist LIVE - Monocle
The Urbanist LIVE - Monocle

Join us for this special live episode of The Urbanist at our Marylebone HQ, where Monocle editor Andrew Tuck hands over the floor to city-planners, policy-makers and urban leaders to discuss how to build a better London. How would you ​fix the capital? We’ll look at transport, culture, housing, business, the night-time economy and much more. Be part of the debate following the election of the city’s new mayor.

Malkit Shoshan on How the City is a Shared Ground for the Instruments of War and Peace

10:45 - 17 May, 2016
Malkit Shoshan on How the City is a Shared Ground for the Instruments of War and Peace, Initial set-up, Camp Castor, Gao (Mali). Image © The Dutch Ministry of Defense
Initial set-up, Camp Castor, Gao (Mali). Image © The Dutch Ministry of Defense

Can architects have a truly active role in pressing social problems? Malkit Shoshan, the curator of the Dutch Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, thinks so. Her career is evidence of this: advocating for the incorporation of a fourth 'D' in the criteria of the UN (Defence, Diplomacy and Development) in its peacekeeping missions around the world, Shoshan has sat at the same table as military engineers and policy makers to analyze the urban impact peacekeepers have left around the world.

For the Dutch Pavilion, Shoshan has focused on the case of the joint mission of the Netherlands and the UN in Gao (Mali). In 2012, Gao was declared capital of the Independent State of Azawad, a nation not recognized by the international authorities, following Mali's Tuareg rebellion. "Although [these peacekeeping missions] occupy large plots of land in hundreds of different cities around the world, it is rarely discussed or addressed by our profession," says Soshan in the following interview.

We spoke with the curator of the Dutch pavilion after her recent visit to Mali to discuss the principles of the Netherlands in the next Venice Biennale; the impact of military drones in public spaces and why, according Shoshan, there is a close relationship between architecture, public policy and ideology. "[With design,] we can make resources available to communities that are exhausted by militarized conflicts, long periods of drought, famine and disease," she says.

Cinema and the City: 10 Films Starring Cities

06:00 - 21 March, 2016
Cinema and the City: 10 Films Starring Cities, Asas do Desejo, Wim Wenders (1987)
Asas do Desejo, Wim Wenders (1987)

The city has been explored as a theme in movies since the early days of cinema, appearing as both a setting and a protagonist in films by renowned directors like Fritz Lang, Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Roberto Rossellini and Quentin Tarantino. In one of the first films ever made, Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat (1925), the Lumière brothers already show the modern urban environment as an important element and part of the contextualization.

Yet the cinema and the city have an extensive relationship, each influencing one another. The influence of architecture (especially modern) in the settings and cities of films can be seen in movies like Jacques Tati’s My Uncle (1958) and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982), while the influence of cinema in architecture and buildings can be seen in the work of architects like Rem Koolhaas, Jean Nouvel and Bernard Tschumi.

We have compiled a list of 10 films in which the city plays a much more important role than just the mere setting, acting as a true protagonist of the plot. 

AIPH International Green City Conference

18:00 - 2 March, 2016
AIPH International Green City Conference

AIPH and Canadian Nursery Landscape Association (CNLA) invites all those with an interest in making our cities healthier and happier to join them in Vancouver, Canada on 16-18 March 2016 for the AIPH International Green City Conference, sponsored by TD Canada. The event will be held in conjunction with the AIPH Spring Meetings, the ELCA Board Meetings and the Landscape Canada Summit. The conference will give delegates a chance to see innovations in urban green infrastructure and planning on a global scale. 

Asia Pacific Architecture Forum

16:00 - 22 February, 2016
Asia Pacific Architecture Forum

Australia to host landmark gathering of architects from Asia Pacific. As the Asia Pacific experiences unprecedented urban growth, architects will play a critical role in shaping the future of cities across the region. The diversity of its people and countries will be explored in the Asia Pacific Architecture Forum, taking place in Brisbane from 1 to 14 March 2016.

ASF-UK Symposium: Designing In Uncertain Global Times

16:30 - 4 February, 2016
ASF-UK Symposium:  Designing In Uncertain Global Times

Join ASF-UK for a one day symposium to explore how built environment practitioners can respond to emerging global challenges in cities. With highly interactive sessions throughout the day, we will test and discuss different skills, approaches and knowledge that can ‘challenge practice’ in order to design in uncertain global times. The day will be a great opportunity to expand your knowledge of working in this sector, to network with others in this field and a chance to discover ways in which to engage with ASF-UK. The event will end with a reflection by practitioners involved in innovative forms of practice in the UK and around the world.

The Spirit of Cities Captured in Collage

16:00 - 31 January, 2016
SE / Norrland. Image Courtesy of Anastasia Savinova
SE / Norrland. Image Courtesy of Anastasia Savinova

Sweden based visual artist, Anastasia Savinova, has created a series of collages that seek to capture the spirit of cities. Titled “Genius Loci,” her collages form a big house that is composed of many buildings characteristic of each city, visualizing the way of life, the atmosphere, and the feeling of each place. Photographs of architecture are the foundational components of her art work, representing the feeling as a whole.

Silo / RU . Image Courtesy of Anastasia Savinova France. Image Courtesy of Anastasia Savinova Denmark / Copenhagen. Image Courtesy of Anastasia Savinova SE / Sweden / Dalarna. Image Courtesy of Anastasia Savinova +14

How Schønherr is Transforming Aarhus with Experimental Urban Interventions

09:00 - 30 January, 2016
How Schønherr is Transforming Aarhus with Experimental Urban Interventions, The City Park / Schønherr. Image © Martin Dam Kristensen for Aarhus Festival
The City Park / Schønherr. Image © Martin Dam Kristensen for Aarhus Festival

Since 2010, the Danish architects from Schønherr have been developing a series of large-scale urban interventions for the Aarhus Festival, the largest cultural festival in Denmark. These temporary projects have transformed the streets and parks into extraordinary public spaces, changing the natural topography of the city to attract citizens and bring them together.

We present their last four projects: "The Forest" (2010), "The City Park" (2012), "The Plaza" (2014) and "Bishops Square" (to be completed this 2016).

The City Park / Schønherr. Image © Martin Dam Kristensen for Aarhus Festival The Plaza / Schønherr. Image © Martin Schubert The City Park / Schønherr. Image © Martin Dam Kristensen for Aarhus Festival The Plaza / Schønherr. Image © Martin Schubert +49

Wear Your Favorite City on Your Finger with These Architectural Rings

14:00 - 23 January, 2016
Wear Your Favorite City on Your Finger with These Architectural Rings, via Colossal
via Colossal

Have you ever fallen in love with a city, and wished you could carry the image of the skyline with you everywhere you go? Now you can turn that longing into a reality with these cityscape-inspired rings by North Carolina-based jewelry maker, Ola Shekhtman.

158 Finalists Named in Knight Cities Challenge

14:00 - 16 January, 2016
158 Finalists Named in Knight Cities Challenge, 2015 Winning Entry by Jacques Gaffigan. Image Courtesy of The Knight Foundation
2015 Winning Entry by Jacques Gaffigan. Image Courtesy of The Knight Foundation

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation has announced the names of the 158 finalists in the Knight Cities Challenge. The nationwide call was for innovative ideas to make the 26 communities where the Knight Foundation invests more social and vibrant places to live. More than 4,500 entries were submitted proposing a range of ideas from opening the world’s largest African American history museum in Detroit to a card game that encourages residents of Charlotte to visit new neighborhoods. The winners, who will split a prize of $5 million, will be announced in the spring of 2016.