Iwan Baan

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Places Journal Explores the Past, Present and Future of Urban Skyways

09:30 - 28 May, 2016
Places Journal Explores the Past, Present and Future of Urban Skyways, Part of Calgary's "+15" network of skybridges. Image © Wikimedia user Qyd licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 (adapted)
Part of Calgary's "+15" network of skybridges. Image © Wikimedia user Qyd licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 (adapted)

When hearing the word “skybridge” or “elevated walkway,” what often comes to mind is a narrow, glassed-in pathway perhaps crossing between two office buildings or hospital concourses; a narrow artery whose only purpose seems to be keeping people dry and away from cars as they walk from meeting to meeting. But this wasn’t always the case - in the 1960s, skyways were seen as radical urban inventions that would bring city circulation into the 3rd dimension. Championed in the United States by architect Victor Gruen, following ideals espoused by both CIAM and Team 10 in Europe, the skyway movement took hold in cities all over the world with varying degrees of success, but rarely with the fluid connections between levels originally envisioned by its designers.

Tate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron

11:00 - 23 May, 2016
Tate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +8

Swiss Embassy / LOCALARCHITECTURE

03:00 - 11 May, 2016
Swiss Embassy  / LOCALARCHITECTURE, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan
  • Architects

  • Location

    Rue du Bélier, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
  • Area

    208.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +28

RIBA Announces 17 Winners of South Awards

06:00 - 10 May, 2016
RIBA Announces 17 Winners of South Awards, Sandpath; Oxfordshire / Adrian James Architects.. Image © David Fisher
Sandpath; Oxfordshire / Adrian James Architects.. Image © David Fisher

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced 17 winners for its RIBA South Awards, which recognize architectural excellence. These 17 regional award winners were drawn from a shortlist of 30 projects. Over the next few months, they will be considered for the RIBA National Awards, and then for the RIBA Stirling Prize.

The 17 winners of the RIBA South East Awards are:

Spotlight: Herzog & de Meuron

08:00 - 8 May, 2016
Spotlight: Herzog & de Meuron, VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra
VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra

Led by Jacques Herzog (born 19 April 1950) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950), most descriptions of Herzog & de Meuron projects are almost paradoxical: in one paragraph they will be praised for their dedication to tradition and vernacular forms, in the next for their thoroughly modern innovation. However, in the hands of Herzog & de Meuron this is no paradox, as the internationally-renowned architectural duo combine tradition and innovation in such a way that the two elements actually enhance each other.

Critical Round-Up: Snøhetta's SFMOMA Extension

09:30 - 5 May, 2016
Critical Round-Up: Snøhetta's SFMOMA Extension, © Jon McNeal
© Jon McNeal

Shoehorned into the narrow space behind Mario Botta’s 1995 building, the Snøhetta-designed new wing of the SFMOMA was forced to go where few museums have gone before: up. Rising 10 stories into the San Francisco skyline, the new building nearly triples the amount of existing gallery space and adds a new entrance into what is now one of the world’s largest buildings dedicated to modern art. As the museum is set to reopen to the public May 14th, the critics' takes are rolling in. Did the restrictive site inspire a unique design solution or limit the creative possibilities of the project? Read on to find out.

© Henrik Kam © Jason Chinn (Flickr: jasonchinn) © Henrik Kam © Iwan Baan +7

SFMOMA Expansion / Snøhetta

20:00 - 4 May, 2016
SFMOMA Expansion / Snøhetta, © Henrik Kam
© Henrik Kam

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +33

Iwan Baan's Photographs of the Harbin Opera House in Winter

14:00 - 28 April, 2016
Iwan Baan's Photographs of the Harbin Opera House in Winter , © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Iwan Baan has unveiled a new series of images depicting a snow-covered Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects and its surrounding landscapes. The northern Chinese city of Harbin is known for its brutal winters where temperatures can reach -22°F (-30°C). In the photographs, the Opera House's sinuous white aluminum cladding echoes the ice formed in the adjacent river. “Harbin is very cold for the most of the year,” says MAD principal and founder Ma Yansong. “I envisioned a building that would blend into the winter landscape as a white snow dune arising from the wetlands.”

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +25

Interview with Toshiko Mori: “Rather Than Working With Forms, We Work With Forces”

10:00 - 25 April, 2016
Interview with Toshiko Mori: “Rather Than Working With Forms, We Work With Forces”, Newspaper Café in China. Image © Iwan Baan
Newspaper Café in China. Image © Iwan Baan

As a Japanese immigrant who has spent much of her life in the United States, the architecture of Toshiko Mori occupies an interesting space: on one hand, the material and tectonic culture of Japan is, as she puts it, her “DNA.” On the other hand, her work clearly draws inspiration from the Modernists of 20th century America, and most notably from Mies van der Rohe. In this interview from his “City of Ideas” series, Vladimir Belogolovsky speaks with Mori (his former architecture professor) about materials, details, and the inspiration behind her work.

Vladimir Belogolovsky: You came to the US as a teenager with your parents from Japan in the 1960s. Were you interested in art early on back in Japan or was it something that you discovered already here?

Toshiko Mori: I was already interested in art as a child, always drawing, painting, making sculptures and models. I continued doing that here.

Syracuse Center for Excellence, Syracuse, NY. Image © Iwan Baan House in Columbia County, NY with Antony Gormley sculpture. Image © Iwan Baan Extension to Marcel Breuer's House in Connecticut II. Image © Paul Warchol Cultural Center in Senegal (Thread: Artists’ Residency + Cultural Center). Image © Iwan Baan +57

Iwan Baan on Capturing the Harbin Opera House

06:00 - 18 April, 2016

In a new film by NOWNESS, Dutch photographer Iwan Baan explains his process for photographing MAD architects Harbin Opera House in the northern region of China. The short documentary describes the power of architectural photography and how Baan aims to capture the present moment of a place, instead of creating a timeless scene.

ETFE: The Rise of Architecture's Favorite Polymer

14:00 - 6 April, 2016
ETFE: The Rise of Architecture's Favorite Polymer, The Eden Project / Grimshaw. Image © flickr user timparkinson, Licensed under CC BY 2.0
The Eden Project / Grimshaw. Image © flickr user timparkinson, Licensed under CC BY 2.0

Until recently, the architecture world largely viewed plastic polymers as inferior building materials, handy for wipe-clean kitchen surfaces, but not practical in full-scale building applications. But with technological innovations driving material capabilities forward, polymers are now being taken seriously as a legitimate part of the architect’s pallet. One of the most widely-used of these materials is a fluorine-based plastic known as ETFE (Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene). Brought into the public consciousness thanks to its use on the facade of PTW ArchitectsWater Cube for the 2008 Beijing Olympics, architects are now realizing the film’s capabilities to express a new aesthetic and replace costlier transparent and translucent materials.

© flickr user manusascorner, Licensed under CC BY 2.0 SSE Hydro Arena / Foster + Partners. Image Courtesy of Figueras Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center / HOK. Image © John Linden Watercube National Swimming Centre / PTW Architects. Image © flickr user garrettziegler, Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 +8

12 Projects that Explain Landscape Urbanism and How It's Changing the Face of Cities

08:00 - 6 April, 2016
12 Projects that Explain Landscape Urbanism and How It's Changing the Face of Cities

In his new book Landscape as Urbanism, Charles Waldheim, the John E. Irving Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, argues that in order to understand the twenty-first century metropolis, “a traditional understanding of the city as an extrapolation of architectural models and metaphors is no longer viable given the prevalence of larger forces or flows. These include ruptures or breaks in architectonic logic of traditional urban form as compelled by ecological, infrastructural, or economic change.”

In other words, spatial constructions in urban environments should no longer be attached to intractable functions or intent on isolation, but should instead integrate into the fabric of the city. These types of projects must be flexible to the inevitable changes in functionality and purpose that are byproducts of economic change and evolutions in land-use intentions. The dozen projects featured here are exemplary of such practices, both in how they adapt to past interventions and in how they move beyond the notion of a static future for urban conditions that are perpetually in flux.

Tributes Pour in With News of Zaha Hadid's Passing

12:00 - 1 April, 2016
Tributes Pour in With News of Zaha Hadid's Passing, Zaha Hadid. Image © Brigitte Lacombe
Zaha Hadid. Image © Brigitte Lacombe

Zaha Hadid's sudden passing has led to an outpouring of heartfelt tributes from some of the profession's most prominent figures. A "brave and radical" trailblazer, and the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize, Hadid's significant impact on the world of architecture is undeniable. She will be missed. 

"We are all shocked and devastated that we lost Zaha today, a most beautiful individual, talent, leader and friend," Patrik Schumacher, Director of Zaha Hadid Architects, wrote on Facebook.

We will continue to update this link as more tributes come in. 

Plastic Architecture: 12 Projects that Highlight the Potential of Polymers

17:30 - 23 March, 2016
Plastic Architecture: 12 Projects that Highlight the Potential of Polymers

Over time, an endless spectrum of materials has become available for use within the realm of architecture. However, one material that seems underrepresented is plastic, a versatile and malleable compound that can be used for a wide variety of purposes. In light of the many applications of plastics in architecture, we have compiled a list of 12 projects that utilize plastic: from repurposing plastic bottles to the use of translucent plastic siding, these projects represent just a few of the many ways that plastic can be used as a primary material.

Blavatnik School of Government / Herzog & de Meuron

03:00 - 8 March, 2016
Blavatnik School of Government / Herzog & de Meuron, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan
  • Architects

  • Location

    Woodstock Rd, Oxford, Oxfordshire OX2 6GG, UK
  • Partners

    Jacques Herzog, Pierre de Meuron, Ascan Mergenthaler (Partner in Charge)
  • Area

    9800.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +4

Jeanne Gang Named Architect of the Year in AR's 2016 Women in Architecture Awards

10:30 - 4 March, 2016
Jeanne Gang Named Architect of the Year in AR's 2016 Women in Architecture Awards, Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership / Studio Gang. Image © Steve Hall for Hedrich Blessing
Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership / Studio Gang. Image © Steve Hall for Hedrich Blessing

The Architectural Review has announced the final winners in its 2016 Women in Architecture awards, awarding Mexican architect Gabriela Etchegaray with the Moira Gemmill Prize for Emerging Architecture, and Jeanne Gang with the Architect of the Year award. In honoring Gang and Etchegaray, the AR noted that both "have demonstrated excellence in design and a commitment to working both sustainably and democratically with local communities." The pair join other Women in Architecture Award winners Odile Decq and Julia Peyton-Jones, who last week received the 2016 Jane Drew Prize and Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, respectively. Read on for more about the awards.

"Array of Things" is A Ray of Hope for Big-Data-Based Urban Design

09:30 - 3 March, 2016
"Array of Things" is A Ray of Hope for Big-Data-Based Urban Design, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

For a number of years now, Smart Cities and Big Data have been heralded as the future of urban design, taking advantage of our connected, technological world to make informed decisions on urban design and policy. But how can we make sure that we're collecting the best data? In this story, originally published on Autodesk's Line//Shape//Space publication as "'Array' of Possibilities: Chicago’s New Wireless Sensor Networks to Create an Urban Internet of Things," Matt Alderton looks at a new initiative in Chicago to collect and publish data in a more comprehensive way than ever before.

If it hasn’t already, your daily routine will soon undergo a massive makeover.

For starters, when your alarm clock goes off, it will tell your coffeemaker to start brewing your morning joe. Then, when you’re on the way to work, your car will detect heavy traffic and send a text message to your boss, letting her know you’ll be late. When you arrive, you’ll print out the agenda for today’s staff meeting, at which point your printer will check how much ink it has left and automatically order its own replacement cartridges.

At lunch, you’ll think about dinner and use your smartphone to start the roast that’s waiting in your slow cooker at home. And when you come home a few hours later, your house will know you’re near, automatically turning on the lights, the heat, and the TV—channel changed to the evening news—prior to your arrival. It will be marvelous, and you’ll owe it all to the Internet of Things (IoT).

Julia Peyton-Jones Wins Ada Louise Huxtable Prize

12:00 - 26 February, 2016
Julia Peyton-Jones Wins Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, SelgasCano's 2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion . Image © Iwan Baan
SelgasCano's 2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion . Image © Iwan Baan

Julia Peyton-Jones has won the 2016 Ada Louise Huxtable Prize. Awarded as part of the Architectural Review's (AR) annual Women in Architecture Awards, the prize honors Peyton-Jones' "incredible global impact achieved with limited resources – and as someone who has done so much to nurture architectural vision and make architecture available to many people."

Peyton-Jones has serves as the Serpentine Gallery co-director for the past 25 years, overseeing the start of the Serpentine Gallery Pavillon commissions and opening of Zaha Hadid ArchitectsSerpentine Sackler Gallery. She will step down from her longstanding position this summer.