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Resiliency: The Latest Architecture and News

Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example

07:00 - 5 July, 2019
Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example, © Carolina Barría Kemp, under license <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt
© Carolina Barría Kemp, under license CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt

Chile is a country used to natural disasters as much as to the reconstruction process. However, the frequency of these cycles has increased over the years. According to the Ministry of Interior (Homeland), 43% of all natural disasters recorded in Chile since 1960 happened between 2014 and 2017. In fact, the government is already involved in several reconstruction processes across the country.

Designed by Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos, Kaukari Urban Park turned the channel of the Copiapó River into an accessible urban green space, capable of controling potential floods, just as it happened in 2015. Image © Rodrigo Opazo Designed by Sebastian Irarrázaval, the Constitución Public Library was part of a public-private initiative taken to rebuild the city of Constitución after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Felipe Díaz Contardo Designed by PLAN Arquitectos, Constitución's Consistorial Town Hall was part of the reconstruction of the city after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Pablo Blanco Villa Verde Housing / ELEMENTAL. Image © Suyin Chia + 7

The Cutting-Edge Materials Science Making Hurricane-Proof Construction Possible

09:30 - 7 December, 2017
The Cutting-Edge Materials Science Making Hurricane-Proof Construction Possible, Perez Art Museum Miami, built with ultra-high-performance concrete, sustained no damage in Hurricane Irma. Image © Iwan Baan
Perez Art Museum Miami, built with ultra-high-performance concrete, sustained no damage in Hurricane Irma. Image © Iwan Baan

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Hurricane-Proof Construction Methods Can Prevent the Destruction of Communities."

The four hurricanes that slammed into heavily populated areas from the Caribbean to Texas this summer are inching toward a half-trillion-dollar price tag in damages—to say nothing of the work and wages missed by shutting down entire cities. Buildings are the most visible marker of a place’s resilience after a disaster strikes. Surveying the catastrophic damage forces a difficult question: How can it be rebuilt better?

Jintai Village Reconstruction / Rural Urban Framework

03:00 - 2 November, 2017
Jintai Village Reconstruction / Rural Urban Framework, via Rural Urban Framework
via Rural Urban Framework

via Rural Urban Framework via Rural Urban Framework via Rural Urban Framework via Rural Urban Framework + 27

  • Architects

  • Location

    Nanjiang, Bazhong, Sichuan, China
  • Category

  • Design

    John Lin, Joshua Bolchover
  • Landscape Design

    Dorothy Tang
  • Area

    4000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2014

2016 Design Matters Conference presented by the Association of Architecture Organizations

05:00 - 15 September, 2016
2016 Design Matters Conference presented by the Association of Architecture Organizations

The Design Matters Conference presented by the Association of Architecture Organizations is the world’s only dedicated annual meeting that seeks to bring top designers, journalists and civic leaders into exploratory dialogue with those not-for-profit professionals and volunteers charged with creating cultural programs (exhibitions, tours, lectures and symposia, festivals and films, youth outreach) to spur broader public interest in architecture and design.

Resilient Landscapes: Designing for Water, Risk, and Remediation

12:57 - 1 August, 2016
Resilient Landscapes: Designing for Water, Risk, and Remediation, San Mateo Wastewater Treatment Plant Competition Finalist - Perkins+Will San Francisco
San Mateo Wastewater Treatment Plant Competition Finalist - Perkins+Will San Francisco

Our urban environment is in constant flux brought on by changes in economies and climate change. Issues of adaptation and resiliency are increasingly more relevant to all design disciplines. Jim Wasley and Jennifer Cooper-Sabo will discuss their design projects and research related to managing stormwater, revitalizing brownfields, and assessing climate change risk and adaptation in the Great Lakes and Bay Area regions.

reSITE 2016: 5th International Conference on a Hot Topic – “Cities in Migration”

12:00 - 9 June, 2016
reSITE 2016: 5th International Conference on a Hot Topic – “Cities in Migration”, reSITE Conference, Prague, Forum Karlin. Photo Dorota Velek
reSITE Conference, Prague, Forum Karlin. Photo Dorota Velek

On June 16-17, Prague will be hosting one of the leading architecture and urbanist events in Europe. Most of the 49 world renowned experts who will speak at reSITE 2016: Cities in Migration have experienced migration themselves. Coming from 20 countries, they will bring innovative solutions and successful strategies for European and Western cities to come to terms painlessly with the influx of new residents. Carl Weisbrod, Chairman of the City Planning Commission of NYC, Professor Saskia Sassen, sociologist at Columbia University, and Michael Kimmelman, the Architecture Critic for The New York Times will come from New York City. A huge number of speakers will come from Germany. Besides the famous landscape architect, Martin Rein-Cano from Topotek 1, Berlin, we will meet one of the city planner of Munich and the co-founders of the initiative “Refugees Welcome.”

Media Round-Up: Hurricane Katrina, 10 Years On

09:30 - 29 August, 2015
Media Round-Up: Hurricane Katrina, 10 Years On, © Joseph Sohm via Shutterstock
© Joseph Sohm via Shutterstock

Today marks 10 years since Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, setting off what was among the most significant catastrophes to strike the United States in the 21st Century. New Orleans' flood defenses failed, causing the loss of over 1,400 lives and billions of dollars in property damage.

Naturally, such a disaster takes some time to recover from, for individuals but also for a city as a whole, and so for the past decade New Orleans has been a case study for cities to show them how to recover, rebuild and move on - at certain times serving as both an example of good practice and a warning of "what not to do." On the ten-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, here's a round-up of stories about the rebuilding of a city from around the web.

ASF Announces Winners of Inaugural International Awards

12:00 - 25 June, 2015
Espacios de Paz (Spaces for Peace) / PICO Estudio & Movimiento Por la Paz y la Vida. Image Courtesy of ASF International Awards
Espacios de Paz (Spaces for Peace) / PICO Estudio & Movimiento Por la Paz y la Vida. Image Courtesy of ASF International Awards

Architecture Sans Frontières has announced the winners of their inaugural ASF International Awards, which aim to recognize “efficient solutions developed by architects globally to the many social, environmental and economic challenges facing the built environment.”

From 68 submissions, three winners were selected: PICO Estudio & Movimiento Por la Paz y la Vida’s Espacios de Paz (Spaces for Peace) project in Venezuela; ASF France’s La Passerelle in Saint-Denis, France; and Building Trust International for their work in Asia and Africa.

Learn more about the winning projects after the break.

BIG-led Webinar to Discuss the Manhattan “Dry Line”

09:00 - 8 April, 2015
BIG-led Webinar to Discuss the Manhattan “Dry Line”, Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org
Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org

One of the six winners of the Rebuild by Design competition, Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) “Dry Line” project aims to protect Manhattan from future storms like Hurricane Sandy by creating a protective barrier around lower Manhattan. The barrier will be formed by transforming underused waterfront areas into public parks and amenities. Now, you can learn more about the vision behind the project and how it was developed in a webinar led by Jeremy Alain Siegel, the director of the BIG Rebuild by Design team and head of the subsequent East Side Coastal Resiliency Project. The webinar will take place on Friday, June 12. Learn more and sign-up on Performance.Network.

Rockefeller Foundation Announces the Next 35 Cities to Join Its 100 Resilient Cities Challenge

00:00 - 4 December, 2014
Rockefeller Foundation Announces the Next 35 Cities to Join Its 100 Resilient Cities Challenge , BIG’s winning design for the Rebuild by Design competition, the BIG “U”. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org
BIG’s winning design for the Rebuild by Design competition, the BIG “U”. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org

The Rockefeller Foundation has announced the next group of cities that will be part of the 100 Resilient Cities Challenge, which aims to help prepare cities from around the world for the social, economic and physical challenges of the 21st century. After reviewing close to 350 applications from 90 countries across six continents, the Rockefeller Foundation selected 35 cities to join the 32 cities that were announced last year. The cities selected are addressing numerous challenges, ranging from flooding and extreme weather events to economic stress and strains on infrastructure and health systems, according to a press release.

“When you think about what makes a resilient city, you have to think in holistic terms. The reality is that resilience building is a multi-sector, multi-level kind of enterprise,” President of 100 Resilient Cities, Michael Berkowitz, told us earlier this year at the start of the inaugural Chief Resilience Officer summit in New Orleans.

Each city selected receives funding to hire a Chief Resilience Officer and assistance in developing and implementing a resilience strategy. Read on after the break to see which 35 cities were selected. 

100 Resilient Cities: How the Rockefeller Foundation is Addressing Resiliency on a Global Scale

00:00 - 12 November, 2014
100 Resilient Cities: How the Rockefeller Foundation is Addressing Resiliency on a Global Scale, OMA’s proposed Hoboken Waterfront for the “Rebuild by Design” competition, which focused on resilience, sustainability and livability. Image © OMA
OMA’s proposed Hoboken Waterfront for the “Rebuild by Design” competition, which focused on resilience, sustainability and livability. Image © OMA

Resiliency has become a keyword when it comes to city planning and development, so much so that former AIA president, Clark Manus, declared last year that “resilience is the new Green.” To address resiliency on a global level and help cities around the world become more resilient to social, economic and physical challenges, The Rockefeller Foundation kicked off its 100 Resilient Cities Challenge in 2013. Under the initiative,100 cities will be selected to be part of the challenge, where they will receive help and funding to hire a Chief Resilience Officer and assistance in developing and implementing a resilience strategy.

So far 33 cities have been selected and last week the first-ever Chief Resilience Officer summit was held in New Orleans. To learn more about the summit in New Orleans, the overall initiative, and how cities can become more resilient, we spoke with President of 100 Resilient Cities, Michael Berkowitz, who said: "When you think about what makes a resilient city, you have to think in holistic terms. The reality is that resilience building is a multi-sector, multi-level kind of enterprise."

Read the full interview with Berkowitz after the break

The Rockefeller Foundation Kicks Off its 100 Resilient Cities Challenge

00:00 - 28 August, 2014
The Rockefeller Foundation Kicks Off its 100 Resilient Cities Challenge, OMA’s proposed Hoboken Waterfront for the “Rebuild by Design” competition, which focused on resilience, sustainability and livability. Image © OMA
OMA’s proposed Hoboken Waterfront for the “Rebuild by Design” competition, which focused on resilience, sustainability and livability. Image © OMA

The Rockefeller Foundation has kicked off its 2014 100 Resilient Cities Challenge, which aims to help “build resilience to the social, economic, and physical challenges that cities face in an increasingly urbanized world.” Each of the 100 cities selected will receive funding to hire a Chief Resilience Officer and assistance in developing and implementing a resilience strategy.

“We can't predict the next disruption or catastrophe. But we can control how we respond to these challenges. We can adapt to the shocks and stresses of our world and transform them into opportunities for growth,” the 100 Resilient Cities' site reads. While shocks include events like earthquakes, fires and floods, stresses include high unemployment, inefficient public transportation, endemic violence or chronic food and water shortages. The Challenge aims to help cities be better prepared for these adverse events and better able to deliver basic services in both good and bad times to all members of the population.  

 Learn more about the Challenge after the break…

OMA & BIG among 6 Winners in Rebuild By Design Competition

00:00 - 3 June, 2014
OMA & BIG among 6 Winners in Rebuild By Design Competition, The proposed Hoboken Waterfront. Image © OMA
The proposed Hoboken Waterfront. Image © OMA

Yesterday, US Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan announced OMA, BIG and four other teams as the winner of "Rebuild by Design", a competition aimed at rebuilding areas affected by Hurricane Sandy focusing on resilience, sustainability and and livability.

In total, HUD have allocated $920 million to the six projects in New York, New Jersey and Long Island to enable the completion of this vision.

Read more about the winning schemes after the break

New Medowlands: Productive City + Regional Park, by MIT CAU, ZUS, Urbanisten. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org Living, Growing Breakwaters: Staten Island and Raritan Bay, by SCAPE / Landscape Architecture. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org Living with the Bay: Resiliency-Building Options for Nassau County’s South Shore by Interboro Team. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org The BIG U, by BIG. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org + 7

Rockefeller Foundation Selects 33 Cities for Resiliency Challenge

00:00 - 7 December, 2013
Rockefeller Foundation Selects 33 Cities for Resiliency Challenge, White Arkitekter’s winning proposal for New York’s “Resilient Rockaway” competition.
White Arkitekter’s winning proposal for New York’s “Resilient Rockaway” competition.

The Rockefeller Foundation has named the first group of cities selected in the “100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge.” Each city has been chosen for demonstrating “a commitment to building their own capacities to prepare for, withstand, and bounce back rapidly from shocks and stresses.” More than 1,000 registrations and nearly 400 formal applications from cities around the world were submitted. After careful review of each city's challenges, these 33 where chosen:

Resist, Delay, Store, Discharge: OMA's Comprehensive Strategy for Hoboken

01:00 - 19 November, 2013
Resist, Delay, Store, Discharge: OMA's Comprehensive Strategy for Hoboken. Image Courtesy of OMA
Resist, Delay, Store, Discharge: OMA's Comprehensive Strategy for Hoboken. Image Courtesy of OMA

OMA’s comprehensive strategy to rebuild the New Jersey city of Hoboken, after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, has been selected as one of ten initiatives moving forward in the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Rebuild by Design competition. The proposal, Resist, Delay, Store, Discharge, focuses on establishing resiliency through the integration of key infrastructural elements that not only protects coastal neighborhoods, but also the entire city of Hoboken.

10 Projects Advance to Rebuild by Design's Final Round

00:00 - 15 November, 2013
10 Projects Advance to Rebuild by Design's Final Round , The BIG “U”. Image Courtesy of HUD
The BIG “U”. Image Courtesy of HUD

After three months of in-depth analysis and public outreach, the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) has shortlisted 10 design “opportunities” for the third and final round of Rebuild by Design. The design competition, focused on making New York’s Sandy-effected regions more resilient, sustainable, and livable, will now have the final project teams collaborate with local and regional stakeholders in developing their projects over the next five months. The goal is to arrive at projects that are implementable and fundable, leveraging the variety of federal recovery investments being made in the region.

OMA, BIG and WXY are just a few practices involved in the final round. Read on to review a glimpse of each shortlisted proposal.

White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition

01:00 - 23 October, 2013
White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition , View from Pier. Image Courtesy of White Arkitekter
View from Pier. Image Courtesy of White Arkitekter

Stockholm-based White Arkitekter, along with partners ARUP and Gensler, has been announced as the winner of the two-phase “For a Resilient Rockaway” (FAR ROC) design competition in New York. Selected from a shortlist of four and an international pool of 117, White Arkitekter’s “untraditional” proposal aims to transform an 80-acre shoreline site in the Rockaways into a resilient and affordable community through a series of small interventions that can be tested, adjusted, or redesigned overtime during the development process.

What Happens When Smart Cities Malfunction?

00:00 - 14 October, 2013
What Happens When Smart Cities Malfunction?, Image via Flickr CC user. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
Image via Flickr CC user. Used under Creative Commons

An interesting essay by Anthony Townsend in Design Observer investigates a largely unconsidered aspect of smart cities: what happens if (or perhaps when) they malfunction? Townsend argues that as technology seeps into every aspect of our life within a complex system such as a smart city, glitches and bugs are likely to be magnified many times. He also explains that many of the communications systems that smart cities will rely on are insufficiently resilient, meaning entire cities could be vulnerable to failure or attack - an issue that will not sit well with the AIA. You can read the whole essay here.