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Frank Gehry: The Latest Architecture and News

Frank Gehry to Design New London Headquarters for Facebook, Sources Say

14:00 - 7 February, 2018
Frank Gehry to Design New London Headquarters for Facebook, Sources Say, © Flickr user <a href='http://https://www.flickr.com/photos/mattkieffer/8856379186'>mattkieffer</a>. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0<a href='http://'>undefined</a>© Flickr user mattkieffer. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageGranary Square in King's Cross Central
© Flickr user mattkieffer. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0undefined© Flickr user mattkieffer. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageGranary Square in King's Cross Central

Facebook is closing in on a deal to create a new London headquarters, and will be bringing along the design talents of Frank Gehry, according to reports from The Times and Architects’ Journal.

Described as a “growth space” that will allow the company to expand their European presence, the new headquarters would span four buildings in King’s Cross Central – the same part of the city where Google is building its own 11-story “groundscraper” campus designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studios.

New Renderings Show off Gehry's Grand Avenue Development as Project Gets Official Start Date

14:00 - 24 January, 2018
New Renderings Show off Gehry's Grand Avenue Development as Project Gets Official Start Date, Courtesy of Related / Gehry Partners
Courtesy of Related / Gehry Partners

New renderings have been revealed of Gehry PartnersGrand Avenue Project as construction is finally set to begin this fall. Located across from Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles, the development now known as The Grand will offer up retail, entertainment and residences within two blocky, terracing towers.

Courtesy of Related / Gehry Partners Courtesy of Related / Gehry Partners Courtesy of Related / Gehry Partners Courtesy of Related / Gehry Partners + 6

Frank Gehry’s Online Masterclass: A Review By Architecture Students

09:30 - 22 January, 2018

You’ve probably seen the ads. Popping out from your Facebook newsfeed, the Masterclass sales pitch immediately attracts the eye: beautifully backlit wooden models and silky hand sketching emphasized by orchestral swells are accompanied by an adorable pirouette by the one and only Frank Gehry. The combination of Gehry’s status and slick production has managed to amass over 1.6 million views for the trailer on Youtube. Even in the company of courses taught by Martin Scorsese, Deadmau5, and Samuel L Jackson, the lone architect impressively lays claim to the eighth most popular teaser in the Masterclass series. The production value alone is almost a convincing argument for the $90 USD price, a detail that is quietly left out of the trailer.

The course has been reviewed by a critic, a practicing architect, and a curator—but what of its ostensible target audience, the architecture student? Has Masterclass managed to crack the online class conundrum with cinematography and celebrity?

New Renderings Show Gehry's Ocean Avenue Tower Shortened to 12 Stories

12:00 - 5 January, 2018
New Renderings Show Gehry's Ocean Avenue Tower Shortened to 12 Stories, © Gehry Partners. Via City of Santa Monica
© Gehry Partners. Via City of Santa Monica

New renderings have been revealed showing an updated design for Frank Gehry’s ‘Ocean Avenue Project’ in Santa Monica, California.

Originally conceived as as 22-story hotel and residential tower, the project has now been shortened to 12 stories (130 feet) to meet restrictions imposed by the city’s Downtown Community Plan, which calls for “aggressively slow growth” and a “lower scale downtown” of mainly 4-5 story tall buildings.

Frank Gehry Selected to Design Children's Facility for LA Philharmonic

14:30 - 10 November, 2017
Photograph by <a href='http://https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Concert_Hall#/media/File:Disney_Concert_Hall_by_Carol_Highsmith.jpg'>wikimedia user Carol M. Highsmith</a>. Image is in the public domain
Photograph by wikimedia user Carol M. Highsmith. Image is in the public domain

Coinciding with their 100th anniversary, the Los Angeles Philharmonic (LA Phil) has announced plans to build a new, dedicated space for the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles (YOLA) to be designed by Los Angeles’ own Frank Gehry. Architect of Los Angeles’ and one of the world’s most famous performance spaces, the Walt Disney Concert Hall, Gehry has been called upon to transform a 17,000-square-foot facility in the LA neighborhood of Inglewood that will allow LA Phil to reach its goal of doubling the number of students involved in its programs by 2022.

Construction Begins on Frank Gehry's Eisenhower Memorial in Washington DC

15:06 - 3 November, 2017
Construction Begins on Frank Gehry's Eisenhower Memorial in Washington DC, © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission
© Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission

The Frank Gehry-designed Eisenhower Memorial has finally broken ground in Washington DC following a tumultuous years-long approval process.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held yesterday at the National Mall site, located at the intersection of Maryland and Independence Avenues and across from the National Air and Space Museum.

© Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission + 4

The Unexpected Low-Tech Solutions That Made the Guggenheim Bilbao Possible

09:30 - 18 October, 2017
Mountain climber installing titanium facade panels during the construction of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. Photo: Aitor Ortiz. Image © 2017 FMGB Guggenheim Bilbao
Mountain climber installing titanium facade panels during the construction of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. Photo: Aitor Ortiz. Image © 2017 FMGB Guggenheim Bilbao

This article originally appeared on guggenheim.org/blogs under the title "How Analog and Digital Came Together in the 1990s Creation of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao," and is used with permission.

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, which celebrates its twentieth anniversary this month, has been hailed as a pinnacle of technological progress since its October 1997 opening. While the use of the modeling software CATIA (Computer Aided Three-Dimensional Interactive Application) was without question groundbreaking, some of the greatest moments of ingenuity during the building’s design and construction were distinctly low-tech. Developed between 1991 and 1997, the curved and angular titanium-clad building was conceived at the turning point between analog and digital practice. This profound shift enveloped and permeated every aspect of the project, from the design process and construction techniques to the methods of communication technology put to use.

Projection Mapping Light Show Tells the Story of the Guggenheim Bilbao on Its 20th Anniversary

12:00 - 14 October, 2017

In celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Frank Gehry-designed Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, creative production studio 59 Productions has put on a 4-day projection mapping light show, transforming the museum’s iconic shimmering surfaces into a canvas for a dazzling light display.

From October 11-14th, the 20-minute-long multisensory production Reflections combined music, light and projection, creating a show on the building’s north-facing titanium facades that told the story of the museum’s genesis and design.

59 Productions transform Guggenheim Museum Bilbao with Reflections, a spectacular projection-mapping event to celebrate its 20th anniversary. Photo by Justin Sutcliffe. 59 Productions transform Guggenheim Museum Bilbao with Reflections, a spectacular projection-mapping event to celebrate its 20th anniversary. Courtesy 59 Productions 59 Productions transform Guggenheim Museum Bilbao with Reflections, a spectacular projection-mapping event to celebrate its 20th anniversary. Photo by Justin Sutcliffe. 59 Productions transform Guggenheim Museum Bilbao with Reflections, a spectacular projection-mapping event to celebrate its 20th anniversary. Photo by Justin Sutcliffe. + 20

Drawing Event Will Celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

08:00 - 7 October, 2017
Drawing Event Will Celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Courtesy of Flickr user: dbaron
Courtesy of Flickr user: dbaron

On October 15th four languages, three countries, and three astounding architectural projects will be brought together through a series of events and workshops to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation seeks to commemorate the event with a full day program of activities entitled Drawing the Guggenheim. Visitors can explore and sketch the museums during a variety of public drawing exercises, architectural tours, films and family events at each of the Guggenheim locations.

Long-Awaited Grand Avenue Project by Gehry Partners to Begin Construction

14:15 - 14 August, 2017
Long-Awaited Grand Avenue Project by Gehry Partners to Begin Construction, via Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors
via Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors

More than three years after receiving approval from Los Angeles County, the stop-and-start Grand Avenue development project designed by Gehry Partners is finally showing signs that construction may be soon beginning, as developer Related Companies has filed building permits for the project.

The Grand Avenue Project, located at 100 South Grand Avenue across from the Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall, has been in the works for more than a decade, with an original ground breaking date having been anticipated as far back as 2007. In that time, high profile projects have been completed on all sides of the site, including The Broad museum, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and the SOM-designed Los Angeles Federal Courthouse.

9 of the World's Most Intrusive Buildings

09:30 - 14 August, 2017
9 of the World's Most Intrusive Buildings, © EMP|SFM <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aerial_view_of_EMPSFM.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
© EMP|SFM via Wikimedia licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

In 2017, many of the world's cities have become potpourri time capsules of architecture. We live in an eclectic era in which a 19th-century industrial loft, post-war townhouse, and brand new high rise condominium are all comparably desirable properties. This increasingly varied urban landscape—and the appetite for variety of the people who live there—makes it more difficult than ever for new architecture to grab the public's attention.

To combat this, architects often attempt to produce an "iconic" work: a building whose design is so so striking that it attracts even a layperson's focus. Sometimes this ambition pays off as timeless, and sometimes it irreversibly pock-marks the skyline. What follows is a collection of attention grabbing structures. Will they be remembered as eccentric landmarks or glaring eyesores? You decide.

The Unexpected First Jobs of Seven Famous Architects

09:30 - 31 July, 2017
The Unexpected First Jobs of Seven Famous Architects

Seniority is infamously important in the field of architecture. Despite occasionally being on the butt end of wage jokes, the field can actually pay relatively well—assuming that you’ve been working for a couple of decades. Even Bjarke Ingels, the tech-savvy, video-producing, Netflix-documentary-starring provocateur and founder of the ultra-contemporary BIG isn’t a millennial; at 42 the Dane is a full nine years older than Mark Zuckerberg.

As a result of this, it's common to lead a rich and complex life before finding architectural fame, and many of the world’s most successful architects started their careers off in an entirely different field. If you haven't landed your dream job yet, you may find the following list of famous architects' first gigs reassuring.

Renderings Revealed of Gehry Partners' Future Tree-Covered Playa Vista Office

12:30 - 20 July, 2017
Renderings Revealed of Gehry Partners' Future Tree-Covered Playa Vista Office , via LA Department of City Planning
via LA Department of City Planning

Renderings for a new office building in the Playa Vista neighborhood of Los Angeles designed by Gehry Partners have been revealed in documents released by the LA Department of City Planning. Called New Beatrice West, the eight-story development consists of a series of terraced glass boxes, capped with abundant vegetation aimed at contributing passive energy-efficiency to the complex. The new building will integrate an existing adjacent office building that currently houses the offices of Gehry Partners.

via LA Department of City Planning via LA Department of City Planning via LA Department of City Planning via LA Department of City Planning + 5

"Don't Blame Me!": 6 Projects That Were Disowned by High-Profile Architects

09:30 - 22 May, 2017
"Don't Blame Me!": 6 Projects That Were Disowned by High-Profile Architects, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/tseedmund/5351328288/'>Flickr user tseedmund</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Flickr user tseedmund licensed under CC BY 2.0

Construction is an exercise in frugality and compromise. To see their work realized, architects have to juggle the demands of developers, contractors, clients, engineers—sometimes even governments. The resulting concessions often leave designers with a bruised ego and a dissatisfying architectural result. While these architects always do their best to rectify any problems, some disputes get so heated that the architect feels they have no choice but to walk away from their own work. Here are 6 of the most notable examples:

Courtesy of Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Studio Pali Fekete architects, AMPAS © Oskar Da Riz Fotografie © Danica O. Kus © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/18378655@N00/2894726149/'>Flickr user James Cridland</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 7

"See You in Court!": 9 of Architecture’s Nastiest Lawsuits

09:30 - 8 May, 2017
© <a href=‘https://www.flickr.com/photos/diversey/16868722144/'>Flickr user diversey</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-2.0</a>
© Flickr user diversey licensed under CC BY-2.0

What did Pritzker Prize winner Frank Gehry get when he designed the Stata Center, an exuberantly whimsical academic complex for MIT? A very large check, plus a major lawsuit, alleging negligence and breach of contract due to rampant leaks, mold, cracks, drainage problems and sliding ice. Sometimes the most inspired designs can go awry. And when they do, some clients lawyer up. Here are 9 fascinating examples.

Architecture Takes Center Stage With Google Earth Relaunch

10:00 - 18 April, 2017

Google Earth is no longer a clunky, data-intensive desktop or mobile application. As of today, one of the tech-giant's flagship (and unrivalled) products has been relaunched as a widely accessible web application for Google Chrome. This means that anyone can now access the full Google Earth product, free of charge, without having to install software or download mobile applications.

Getty Research Institute Acquires Extensive Frank Gehry Archive

16:30 - 30 March, 2017
Getty Research Institute Acquires Extensive Frank Gehry Archive, Frank Gehry, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Model, 2003; Los Angeles, California; Frank Gehry Papers at the Getty Research Institute, © Frank O. Gehry
Frank Gehry, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Model, 2003; Los Angeles, California; Frank Gehry Papers at the Getty Research Institute, © Frank O. Gehry

The Getty Research Institute has announced their acquisition of the Frank Gehry Papers, a major archive covering work from the architect’s career, including drawings, partial and complete models, project documentation, correspondence, photographs, slides and related materials pertaining to 283 projects from Gehry’s early to mid career.

“Frank Gehry is undoubtedly the world’s most famous living architect. This extensive archive, covering the first three decades of his illustrious career, offers an in-depth look at the genesis of Gehry’s distinctive style and includes many of the projects for which he is internationally known,” said Thomas W. Gaehtgens, director of the Getty Research Institute.

Frank Gehry, Sirmai-Peterson House, Model, 1983-1988; Thousand Oaks, California; Frank Gehry Papers at the Getty Research Institute Frank Gehry, Greber Studio Sketch, 1967, unbuilt; Beverly Glen, California; Frank Gehry Papers at the Getty Research Institute, © Frank O. Gehry Frank Gehry, Winton Guest House, Model, 1982-1987; Wayzata, Minnesota; Frank Gehry Papers at the Getty Research Institute Frank Gehry, Ron Davis House, South Elevation, 1968-1972; Malibu, California; Frank Gehry Papers at the Getty Research Institute, © Frank O. Gehry + 7

Philadelphia Museum of Art Breaks Ground on Frank Gehry's $196 Million Renovation Scheme

14:15 - 30 March, 2017
Philadelphia Museum of Art Breaks Ground on Frank Gehry's $196 Million Renovation Scheme, AFTER: The Forum, looking west and up to Lenfest Hall. The Forum extends from Level A to Level C and will be one of the most highly trafficked and recognizable areas created during the Core Project. This stunning space will serve as a venue for performances and events, as well as a welcoming spot for visitors to socialize or orient themselves. Architectural rendering by Gehry Partners, LLP and KX-L. Photo courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art.
AFTER: The Forum, looking west and up to Lenfest Hall. The Forum extends from Level A to Level C and will be one of the most highly trafficked and recognizable areas created during the Core Project. This stunning space will serve as a venue for performances and events, as well as a welcoming spot for visitors to socialize or orient themselves. Architectural rendering by Gehry Partners, LLP and KX-L. Photo courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art has broken ground on the Core Project, a $196 million transformation of its main building led by Frank Gehry. In total, the renovation will add a total of 90,000 square feet to the museum, including 67,000 square feet of new public space, 11,500 square feet of gallery space for the museum’s American Art collection, and another 11,500 square feet of contemporary art display space.

As suggested by its name, The Core Project will focus on the heart of the museum; the main circulation of the building will be completely reorganized and museum infrastructure will receive much-needed upgrades, improving access to the community and enhancing the visitor experience.

AFTER: The Forum, looking west and up to Lenfest Hall. The Forum extends from Level A to Level C and will be one of the most highly trafficked and recognizable areas created during the Core Project. This stunning space will serve as a venue for performances and events, as well as a welcoming spot for visitors to socialize or orient themselves. Architectural rendering by Gehry Partners, LLP and KX-L. Photo courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art. BEFORE: The Van Pelt Auditorium, shown here in 2016, is being demolished to create the Forum. The auditorium was not part of the original design for the building, which opened in 1928; it was added in 1959. Photograph by Elizabeth Leitzell. Photo courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art. BEFORE: The Van Pelt Auditorium, shown here in 2016, is being demolished to create the Forum. The auditorium was not part of the original design for the building, which opened in 1928; it was added in 1959. Photograph by Elizabeth Leitzell. Photo courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art. AFTER: The Forum, looking east. Many significant improvements are happening on Level A, including the removal of the auditorium to create the Forum. The heart of the Museum will be opened up to simplify wayfinding. Architectural rendering by Gehry Partners, LLP and KX-L. Photo courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art. + 37