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Bricks: The Latest Architecture and News

Brick by Brick: Rethinking Masonry Construction in Iran

Iran’s architecture has long been rooted in Persian culture. From tea houses and pavilions to domestic huts and elaborate mosques, the country’s built environment is tied to these influences, as well as the landscape and its broader context. At the heart of Iran’s more recent projects is a desire to reinterpret history through new spaces and forms.

© Parham Taghioff © Parham Taghioff Courtesy of Farshad Mehdizadeh Architects + Ahmad Bathaei © Parham Taghioff + 21

This Brick Arch Installation Dissolves in the Rain to Leave a Mortar Skeleton

Sometimes known as the “Island of the Gods,” Jeju Island in South Korea is characterized by its volcanic rock, stunning waterfalls, and warm, tropical climate. Here, life is integrated with nature and the architecture is in harmony with the landscape. Dissolving Arch, a weather-specific installation by stpmj, responds to the island’s tropical environment. The structure began life as a solid brick vault, which then slowly dissolved in the hot and rainy periods of Jeju to produce a light, porous skeleton made of the remaining mortar which connects people with nature.

© EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj © EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj © EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj © EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj + 20

SR32 Residence / HARDT Planejamento

© Jefferson Carollo Filho © Jefferson Carollo Filho © Jefferson Carollo Filho © Jefferson Carollo Filho + 44

Curitiba, Brazil
  • Architects: HARDT Planejamento
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 305.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

Quinta da Baroneza House / Estúdio Penha

© Marcelo Magnani © Marcelo Magnani © Marcelo Magnani © Marcelo Magnani + 32

Bragança Paulista, Brazil
  • Architects: Estúdio Penha
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 650.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014

Leisure Pavilion / brro arquitetos

© André Scarpa © André Scarpa © André Scarpa © André Scarpa + 27

Santo Antônio de Posse, Brazil
  • Architects: brro arquitetos
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 175.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

CM House / Arquea Arquitetos

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli + 25

  • Architects: Arquea Arquitetos
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 293.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

Eaves House / Zoom Urbanismo Arquitetura e Design

São Paulo, Brazil
  • Architects: Zoom Urbanismo, Arquitetura e Design
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 4843.76 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

University of Mpumalanga / GAPP Architects & Urban Designers

© Tristan McLaren © GAPP Architects & Urban Designers © Tristan McLaren © Tristan McLaren + 27

Nelspruit, South Africa

The World's First Zero-Waste Bio-Brick is Grown from Human Urine

Courtesy of University of Cape Town
Courtesy of University of Cape Town

Some years ago, researchers in the United States previously tested the concept of using synthetic urine-based substances to fabricate building materials. However, new research conducted by Masters student Suzanne Lambert at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, puts forth a zero-waste process of producing urine-based bricks by using collected human urine for the first time.

Courtesy of University of Cape Town Courtesy of University of Cape Town Courtesy of University of Cape Town Courtesy of University of Cape Town + 6

MVRDV Proposes Respectful Renovation for 19th Century Heritage Building in Wrocław, Poland

MVRDV has released details of their proposed renovation of a 19th-century listed building on Slodowa Island in Wroclaw, Poland. The “Concordia Hub” will see the retention of the existing façade, with the addition of a contemporary rear extension to “create a focal point” for the general public and visitors.

The site’s former use as a German artillery base in 1945 means almost all of the island’s structures were destroyed in the closing months of World War II. The Concordia Hub scheme seeks to preserve one of the only surviving heritage structures on the island, while transitioning the building into the modern age.

Courtesy of MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV + 4

More Than 2,000 Unique Robotically Manufactured Bricks Generate Variable Walls in This Pavilion

Developed by researchers and students from the Faculty of Architecture at HKU and supported by Sino Group, the 'Ceramic Constellation Pavilion' is built on a wooden structure that supports a series of "walls" formed by about 2,000 clay bricks. Each of these individual components is unique and has been manufactured using robotic technology and 3D printing, allowing to generate different types of transparency and opacity in their different faces.

© Christian J. Lange © Christian J. Lange © Christian J. Lange © Christian J. Lange + 32

Highlights at the 2016 Dutch Design Week Center on Reinventing the Humble Brick

The strength of Dutch Design Week (DDW), held annually at the end of October, lies primarily in product design. Although the event has expanded over the past five years to incorporate more fashion, graphics and architecture, small-scale industrial design has retained its preeminence. Many of the designers on show in this year's edition, however, have embraced the challenges of other design disciplines and allowed them to feed into their work. But where does product design meet architecture? Building materials and, most notably at the 2016 event, some really nice bricks. Rotterdam-based architect Alison Killing guides us through her top installations.

Chinese Artist Makes Bricks from Beijing's Smog

From the Bird’s Nest to the CCTV headquarters, for the past 100 days Chinese performance artist "Nut Brother" has been wandering the streets of Beijing collecting smog with an industrial vacuum so that he can eventually turn it into bricks. He has now began to form his bricks by mixing a combination of the collected "dust and smog" with clay. As he told Quartz, the project is meant to be a symbol. Read the whole story here

This New Brick by MIT-Researchers Uses Little Energy and Helps Deplete Landfills

Traditional Red Bricks. Image Courtesy of MIT Tata Center
Traditional Red Bricks. Image Courtesy of MIT Tata Center

India has one of the fastest growing populations in the world and to accommodate it, a better building material is needed. Currently over 200 billion of the country’s traditional clay fired bricks are manufactured every year, resulting in numerous pollution and environmental problems. To address these issues, a team from MIT –- composed of students Michael Laracy and Thomas Poinot, along with professors Elsa Olivetti, Hamlin Jennings and John Ochsendorf -- has developed Eco-BLAC bricks: an alternative to traditional bricks that reuses industrial waste and is low-cost and low energy.