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Books: The Latest Architecture and News

Living in the Amazon in the 21st Century: A Planning and Urban Design Guide for Cities in the Peruvian Lowland Rainforest

Addressing the universe of the world's largest tropical forest, the book 'Living in the Amazon in the 21st Century: A Guide to Urban Planning and Design for Cities in the Peruvian lowland rainforest', has been selected as a finalist in the category of publications at the 12th Ibero-American Biennial of Architecture and Urbanism. The issue, published in 2019 as part of the PUCP Architecture Publications, in the framework of the CASA (Self-Sustainable Amazonian Cities) project of the Climate Resilient Cities initiative of IDRC, FFLA and CDKN, focuses its research on the department of Loreto, presenting itself as "a guide for architecture and urban design, for settlements in the Amazon forest, including the social processes to be considered".

Living in the Amazon in the 21st Century: A Planning and Urban Design Guide for Cities in the Peruvian Lowland RainforestLiving in the Amazon in the 21st Century: A Planning and Urban Design Guide for Cities in the Peruvian Lowland RainforestLiving in the Amazon in the 21st Century: A Planning and Urban Design Guide for Cities in the Peruvian Lowland RainforestLiving in the Amazon in the 21st Century: A Planning and Urban Design Guide for Cities in the Peruvian Lowland Rainforest+ 7

Reading Spaces: The Book as an Architectural Element

Vac-Library / Farming Architects. Image © Thai Thach, Viet Dung An
Vac-Library / Farming Architects. Image © Thai Thach, Viet Dung An

Far beyond basic training, reading is a leisure activity that is part of modern society. Whether outdoors, in squares and parks, at home or even at work, this habit, which improves reasoning ability and mental health, already had large spaces dedicated to books in palaces and mansions. We selected 15 projects that demonstrate the different ways of integrating reading at different scales and architectural programs.

Reading Spaces: The Book as an Architectural ElementReading Spaces: The Book as an Architectural ElementReading Spaces: The Book as an Architectural ElementReading Spaces: The Book as an Architectural Element+ 16

Queer Spaces: An Atlas of LGBTQIA+ Places and Stories

A queer independent bookshop in Glasgow; an ice cream parlour in Cuba, where strawberry is the queerest choice; a cathedral in ruins in Nicaragua, occupied by the underground LGBTQIA+ community. Queer people have always found ways to exist, gather and celebrate and will always continue to. Therefore, there will always be a need for queer spaces.

Correcting the Record: The Women Who Changed Architecture

Photo by Kate Joyce. Courtesy of Ross Barney Architects and Princeton Architectural Press . ImageChicago Riverwalk, Ross Barney Architects, 2016
Photo by Kate Joyce. Courtesy of Ross Barney Architects and Princeton Architectural Press . ImageChicago Riverwalk, Ross Barney Architects, 2016

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

There’s a famous quote—it’s usually attributed to Winston Churchill—that goes, “History is written by the victors.” This cynical and largely erroneous belief could only be true if history was fixed, settled, static. It never is, and that’s precisely why we have historians. It might be more accurately said that history’s first draft is written by the victors. But first drafts, as any writer will tell you, are famously unreliable. So it is with architectural history. Women have played significant roles in the field since the start of the profession, but that is not how history has recorded it. A new book, The Women Who Changed Architecture (Princeton Architectural Press), a collection of more than 100 mini-biographies of important women architects, covering more than a century, hopes to take a step toward correcting that oversight. Recently, I spoke to Jan Cigliano Hartman, the editor of the volume, about creating the book, important and overlooked figures, and why this isn’t a definitive list.

10 Architecture and Design Books to Add to your Spring Reading List

Courtesy of Publishers
Courtesy of Publishers

Around the two-year anniversary of the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is little that looks the same as it did in March 2020, whether it’s how we work, how we study, or even how we move about our own homes. Many titles in this selection of spring architecture and design book releases show just how authors and design professionals are grappling with the major changes of our time. Volumes such as Debbie Millman’s Why Design Matters and Paola Antonelli’s Design Emergency share the diverse viewpoints and design solutions of some of the world’s leading creative voices; Otto von Busch’s Making Trouble and Max Holleran’s Yes to the City evaluate forms of DIY and housing activism; and Stephen Vider’s Queerness of Home and Suchi Reddy’s Form Follows Feeling tap into a more empathetic, human-centered approach to space. All of them, in some way, look at the past as a way to see clearly into the future of the built environment.

Is Fake the New Real? Searching for an Architectural Reality

Excerpt from the book: Real and Fake in Architecture–Close to the Original, Far from Authenticity? (Edition Axel Menges)

The term “fake” has been in the media frequently in the early 21st century, referring to headlines and fictional statements that are perceived as real and are influencing public opinion and action. Replacing the historically more common term “propaganda,” fake news aims at misinformation and strives to “damage an agency, entity, or person, and/or gain financially or politically, often using sensationalist, dishonest, or outright fabricated headlines.” Tracing fake news and differentiating “real” information from personal opinions and identifying intentional (or unintentional) deceit can be complicated. It is similarly complex to trace the duality of fake and real in the built world. To explore the larger context of fake statements in architecture and environmental design, a look at the definition of fake and related terms might be necessary.

Is Fake the New Real? Searching for an Architectural RealityIs Fake the New Real? Searching for an Architectural RealityIs Fake the New Real? Searching for an Architectural RealityIs Fake the New Real? Searching for an Architectural Reality+ 16

9 Books Worth Adding to Your Winter Reading List

Courtesy Monacelli, Lars Muller, and Princeton Architectural Press
Courtesy Monacelli, Lars Muller, and Princeton Architectural Press

In this week's reprint, Metropolis editors have selected a variety of new and forthcoming architecture and design books, rounding up a compelling reading list for the season. The following titles range from monographs and theoretical inquires to essential knowledge works, from authors like Michael Sorkin, Robert A.M. Stern or Paul Dobraszczyk.

13 Architecture and Design Books to Add to Your Reading List

Now that we are halfway through the year, what better time to prioritize your reading list? Whether you’re interested in the history of interior design, the relationship between architecture and health, or learning more about the 20th century’s forgotten architects, Metropolis editors have selected a variety of current and forthcoming titles that will be sure to get you through 2021.

13 Architecture and Design Books to Add to Your Reading List13 Architecture and Design Books to Add to Your Reading List13 Architecture and Design Books to Add to Your Reading List13 Architecture and Design Books to Add to Your Reading List+ 5

MIT Launches New Open Access Collection of 34 Classical Architecture and Urban Studies E-books

Funded by Andrew W. Mellon and the National Endowment for the Humanities foundations as part of the Open Book Program, a collection of classic books, published between 1964 and 1998 are now available online as open access e-books through the MIT Press Open Architecture and Urban Studies book collection.

Home Library Architecture: 63 Smart & Creative Bookcase Designs

Sharing your shelf is, in a way, sharing yourself. Every element —from the titles you choose to the way you organize them— says something about your personality and your interests. 

125 Best Architecture Books

Architecture has deep wells of research, thought, and theory that are unseen on the surface of a structure. For practitioners, citizens interested, and students alike, books on architecture offer invaluable context to the profession, be it practical, inspirational, academic, or otherwise. So, for those of you looking to expand your bookshelf (or confirm your own tastes), ArchDaily has gathered a broad list of architectural books that we consider of interest to those in the field.

In compiling this list, we sought out titles from different backgrounds with the aim of revealing divergent cultural contexts. From essays to monographs, urban theory to graphic novels, each of the following either engage directly with or flirt on the edges of architecture.

The books on this list were chosen by our editors, and are categorized loosely by type. Read on to see the books we consider valuable to anyone interested in architecture | Last updated in December 2019.

New Book Tells the Forgotten Histories of Bauhaus Women

This article was originally published on Metropolismag.com.

The Bauhaus was founded on the promise of gender equality, but women Bauhauslers had to fight for recognition. A new book recounts the achievements and talents of 45 Bauhaus women.

After the end of World War I, a spirit of optimism and a euphoric mood prevailed in Germany. Thanks to a new republican government and women’s suffrage, the war-torn nation was experiencing a radical new beginning.

As part of that convention-breaking wave, in 1919 German architect Walter Gropius assumed leadership of what would become the legendary Bauhaus. Initially, he declared that there would be “absolute equality” among male and female students.

Day-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist State

Day-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist StateDay-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist StateDay-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist StateDay-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist State+ 46

In the mid-to-late 20th century, a secular, socialist Poland served as the backdrop for the construction of thousands of Catholic churches. In their book Day-VII Architecture, Izabela Cichonska, Karolina Popera, and Kuba Snopek analyze the paradoxical facets of this architecture born at the intersection of secularity and religion, charting how its development was influenced by liturgical reform, political movements, and the growth of postmodernism. In the excerpted introduction below, the authors unfold this history, touching on the Second Vatican Council, Solidarity, the Iron Curtain, and more in relation to the development of Day-VII Architecture's ultimately unique postmodern style. The publication has collected photographs of 100 Polish churches built after the year 1945, accompanied by interviews with their architects. To read more about the authors' original Day-VII documentation project, which served as the groundwork for this book, be sure to visit the original article "These Churches Are the Unrecognized Architecture of Poland's Anti-Communist 'Solidarity' Movement."

Thomas Fisher on The Ethics of Architecture and Other Contradictions

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Why don’t architects often consider the ethics of what they do? Thomas Fisher’s new book, The Architecture of Ethics, digs into this topic in great depth and with engaging insight. At the recent AIA convention in Las Vegas, I sat down with Fisher—former dean of the University of Minnesota College of Design, and now a professor in urban design at the school, as well as director of the Minnesota Design Center—to talk about his book and the ethical dimension of designing and building in the context of contemporary practice.

Spacing Forth the Architecture Selfscape: A Phenomenological Reading of War Ruins in a Lebanese Urban Context

Book Review by Gioia C. Sawaya; Chemaly’s book offers a different attempt to reading war ruins in a Lebanese urban context. It suggests another perception of an architectural space, with the need for a built environment that encourages empathy with the user. He defines this space as a verb (an affording action) rather than a noun. The introduction of the book helps to locate the author’s main aim and frame his discourse.

10 Books on Architecture You Can Read Online For Free

There are few things in this world better than books on architecture, especially when they're available to download for free! Following on from our ever-popular post from 2014, we've gathered up ten more books that cover a broad range of interesting topics—including advice to architecture students from Herman Hertzberger, a look at what sparks the formation and growth of a city, and even a book that offers an in-depth architectural analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's films. Check out the list below!

Listen and Learn: 6 Entrepreneurial Audiobooks to Help You Plan Your Future While You Work

The way we consume long-form content has transformed drastically in recent years. More and more parts of our everyday lives are now transitioning to new digital mediums to save us time.

If you are the type of person who enjoys plugging into a good hard rock or soft jazz playlist while hammering out those 10 sheets of section details, why not simultaneously gain some knowledge about self-motivation or the latest business tactics? These 6 audiobooks could be just what you need to hear to fuel your inner entrepreneur.