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Jack McManus

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Look Inside the Vatican Venice Biennale Chapels in New Video from Spirit of Space

14:00 - 29 July, 2018
Norman Foster. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners
Norman Foster. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners

Vatican City participated in the Venice Architecture Biennale for the first time this year, inviting the public to explore a sequence of unique chapels designed by renowned architects including Norman Foster and Eduardo Souto de Moura. Located in the woods that cover the island of San Giorgio Maggiore, the chapels offer interpretations of Gunnar Asplund’s 1920 chapel at Woodland Cemetery in Stockholm, a seminal example of modernist memorial architecture set in a similarly natural wooded context.

A new video produced by Spirit of Space offers a brief virtual tour of the structures that make up the Holy See’s pavilion, lingering on each just long enough to show different views and angles. As members of the public circulate through the chapels in each shot, the scenes give an impression of how each chapel guides circulation.

10 Unconventional Plywood Projects That Show The Bright Future of 20th Century Materials

08:00 - 27 July, 2018
Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop
Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop

Sold in standard 4 foot wide sheets since 1928, plywood has been a staple of conventional construction for nearly a century. Dimensionally strong, easily cut, lightweight and capable of creating an effective barrier, plywood and other engineered panels like OSB, particle board, and MDF is ubiquitous, particularly for their use as sheathing material in balloon and timber frame construction systems. Boats, airplanes and even automobile frames have historically been built out of plywood, predating (or replacing) steel, aluminum, and fiberglass. As a simple material capable of being manipulated and shaped in a wide variety of ways, sheet ply was also favored in furniture and architectural designs by modernists including Charles and Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen, Alvar Aalto, and Marcel Breuer.

Courtesy of Pablo Esteban Zamorano Courtesy of AREA and Electrotexture Lab © Rien van Rijthoven © Rien van Rijthoven + 27

Caroline Bos, David Adjaye, Li Xiaodong and Many Others to Speak at 2018 World Architecture Festival

16:00 - 26 July, 2018
Caroline Bos, David Adjaye, Li Xiaodong and Many Others to Speak at 2018 World Architecture Festival, The 2018 edition of WAF will be held in Amsterdam, 28-30 November.. Image Courtesy of WAF
The 2018 edition of WAF will be held in Amsterdam, 28-30 November.. Image Courtesy of WAF

After two years in Berlin, the World Architecture Festival will move their 2018 edition to Amsterdam for three days of talks, design presentations, and award ceremonies featuring cutting-edge contemporary works and some of the most prominent figures in architecture today.

These Are The 50 Smartest Cities in the World in 2018

06:00 - 26 July, 2018
These Are The 50 Smartest Cities in the World in 2018, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/22240293@N05'>Flickr user Francisco Diaz</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. Image: New York City, ranked #1 on the Cities In Motion Index
© Flickr user Francisco Diaz licensed under CC BY 2.0. Image: New York City, ranked #1 on the Cities In Motion Index

The Center for Globalization and Strategy from Barcelona’s IESE Business School has unveiled its annual list of the world’s smartest cities. In its fifth year, the IESE Cities in Motion Index has calculated the performance scores for 165 cities across 80 countries based on an exhaustive rubric of economic and social indicators. Familiar global power centers have maintained their position at the top of the heap, while expanded categories of assessment have helped a few small cities advance their position drastically.

7 Shout-Outs to Architects in Rap Lyrics

09:30 - 23 July, 2018
© Messe Basel
© Messe Basel

About a month before he unveiled his eighth album Ye in June, Kanye West re-entered architectural conversation with the unexpected and mostly unexplained announcement that he intends to hire architects and industrial designers to staff an architecture practice connected to his Yeezy brand. An outspoken fan and admirer of contemporary architecture, Kanye’s fashion and design projects have been a major focus for him since shortly after the prodigious producer started making his own rap albums. Kanye’s architectural ambitions have been an interesting factor in the relationship between architecture and rap culture, which seems to be just coming into focus through programs like the Hip Hop Architecture Camps organized by Michael Ford’s Urban Arts Collective, and the research of Sekou Cooke. Architecture and rap music have influenced each other in ways we’re just starting to notice—with the connection between the two even revealed as consciously and conspicuously as rappers including references to notable architects in their lyrics.

ArchDaily at The Midnight Charette Podcast

09:30 - 14 July, 2018
ArchDaily at The Midnight Charette Podcast, Courtesy of The Midnight Charette
Courtesy of The Midnight Charette

In the ten years since our site was launched, ArchDaily has grown into the world’s most visited architecture website; it is now a project with greater reach and scale than the site’s founders could ever have anticipated. Thanks to our readers, contributors and leadership, the initial iteration of the site (based in Chile and known as Plataforma Arquitectura) has evolved into a global architecture media network that includes the English site you’re reading right now as well as region and language-specific sister sites in Brazil, China, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru.

The story of ArchDaily's growth is one of the many topics covered in a new 114-minute interview with ArchDaily’s co-founder David Basulto on this week’s episode of the Midnight Charette podcast. Hosted by David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, the podcast features weekly discussions on design issues of the day and interviews with figures in the architecture community. In their talk with Basulto, the conversation wanders from the story of our company and some behind-the-scenes trivia about how our site works (did you know our custom content management system is named after the biblical Tower of Babel’s designer?) to insights on how architects will shape our future cities and the ways that data collection and analysis could shape the designs of tomorrow.

History's Most Notorious Unfinished Buildings

09:30 - 9 July, 2018
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família

Both today and in centuries past, it is a reality of building that not every project is destined for success. Financial issues or unrealistic timetables can complicate a building’s construction but, while usually the final result eventually meets the initial expectations, other times the worst-case scenario of a building being abandoned during construction becomes a nightmare come true. Unfortunately, these failed projects have an extensive history. Economic factors are the most common cause of unfinished construction, but buildings have also been stranded in limbo by wars, geopolitical shifts, epidemics of disease and other unpredictable obstacles, leaving partial structures as haunting reminders of what might have been.

Whether partially completed and left as ruins or still under construction decades (or centuries) after initial groundbreaking, unfinished buildings offer an alternative history of our built environment, promising long-delayed gratification or examples of design so ambitious that they prove impossible to realize. Initiated by civilizations across the globe, the following list details just a few examples of history’s most interesting and infamous unfinished construction projects.

Image by Ilya Ilusenko <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Palace_Of_Soviets_8.JPG'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain) © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/4675714481'>Flickr user hisgett</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © Raphael Olivier © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tourists_posing_at_the_National_Monument_of_Scotland.jpg'>Wikimedia user Colin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> + 12

Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Installs Coral-Like Pavilion in 17th Century Bruges Seminary

14:00 - 7 July, 2018
© Studio NAARO
© Studio NAARO

As a part of the second Art and Architecture Triennial in Bruges, Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY’s prototype pavilion entitled nonLin/Lin has been taken out of storage and placed on public display for the first time. First commissioned and displayed in 2011 by the FRAC Centre in Orleans, France, the exhibition will explore the rise of computational form-making. The work will spend the summer installed in the nave of the Grootseminarie, a 17th century Cistercian Abbey hosting an exhibition curated by Abdelkader Damani entitled Liquid Architectures.

© Studio NAARO © Studio NAARO © Studio NAARO © Studio NAARO + 18

First Look at Company, the SHoP Architects-Designed Vertical Tech Campus in NYC

08:00 - 7 July, 2018
Courtesy of SHoP Architects
Courtesy of SHoP Architects

Neighboring Grand Central Station, Company’s office building at 335 Madison Avenue has one of the most coveted locations in midtown Manhattan. Charged with completely renovating the building’s atrium and office floors, the local New York firm SHoP Architects has unveiled a set of interior renders that show their plans for the commuter-friendly office space.

Courtesy of SHoP Architects Courtesy of SHoP Architects Courtesy of SHoP Architects Courtesy of SHoP Architects + 8

Look Inside a Collection of Dutch Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin

06:00 - 6 July, 2018
Look Inside a Collection of Dutch Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin, Studioninedots. Image © Marc Goodwin
Studioninedots. Image © Marc Goodwin

Having previously assembled sets of images featuring the offices of architecture firms in Dubai, London, Paris, Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, the Nordic countries, and Barcelona, architectural photographer Marc Goodwin continues the series with an exploration of 17 large and small offices in the Netherlands. Occupying buildings formerly used as offices, banks and old factories, the interior and exterior images capture a glimpse of the lives of these designers and their daily architectural surroundings.

Populous Creates Design-Build Group to Deliver Sports Venue Upgrades (Without Upsetting Fans)

09:30 - 5 July, 2018
Populous Creates Design-Build Group to Deliver Sports Venue Upgrades (Without Upsetting Fans), Arena das Dunas, Brazil by Populous. Image Courtesy of Populous
Arena das Dunas, Brazil by Populous. Image Courtesy of Populous

As an industry populated by creators, the business of design is continually reconsidered and reshaped by processes of reinvention and experimentation. Rarely content with yesterday’s innovations in anything from modeling software to building materials, architects naturally look for strategic ways to gain maximum advantage in both building and business. Taking just such a creative approach to the challenge of improving athletic venues within the stringent time frame of a team’s offseason, the dominant Kansas City-based sports architecture firm Populous recently launched a standalone service that employs the efficiency advantages of a design-build firm to simplify and expand the process of implementing stadium upgrades without any disruption to the fan experience.

Aviva Stadium, Dublin by Populous. Image © Scott Tallon Walker Arena das Dunas, Brazil by Populous. Image Courtesy of Populous Bristol Arena, England by Populous. Image Courtesy of Bristol City council Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi by Populous. Image © 2014 XXII Winter Olympic Games + 9

Steven Holl Architects, Studio Libeskind Among Finalists for University College Dublin's Campus Makeover

12:00 - 30 June, 2018
Steven Holl Architects, Studio Libeskind Among Finalists for University College Dublin's Campus Makeover, Courtesy of John  Ronan  Architects  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of John Ronan Architects / Malcolm Reading Consultants

After receiving 98 entries from teams based in 23 different countries, the jury for University College Dublin’s Future Campus project has selected six proposals for their shortlist, putting each selected firm’s design on display to the public on the project’s website. The finalists include the American firms Steven Holl Architects, Studio Libeskind, Diller Scofidio + Renfro and John Ronan Architects, as well as the Dutch firm UNStudio and Irish architects O’Donnell + Tuomey.

The project will include two major changes to UCD’s Belfield campus, located about 5 km from Dublin’s city center: a major update to the campus’ entry precinct along Stillorgan Road, as well as a new 8,000 square meter Centre for Creative Design, which will house UCD’s design studios.

Olson Kundig Chosen To Design The Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma

16:00 - 29 June, 2018
Olson Kundig Chosen To Design The Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Courtesy of Olson Kundig
Courtesy of Olson Kundig

With construction underway on their renovation of the Space Needle, Olson Kundig will shift their focus to a different American icon. The Seattle firm has unveiled their proposal as lead architect and exhibit designer for The Bob Dylan Center—a new museum that will also house the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Sponsored by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa, the center is expected to open in 2021, with groundbreaking planned for 2019 in the Tulsa Arts District.

Harvard Researchers Detail the 9 Factors That Make a Healthy Building

08:00 - 28 June, 2018
Harvard Researchers Detail the 9 Factors That Make a Healthy Building, © Adolf Bereuter
© Adolf Bereuter

Last month Harvard University’s School of Public Health re-launched their Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, introducing new partnerships and a new director for the institutional home of Dr. Joseph Allen’s Healthy Buildings initiative. With the stated mission of “improving the lives of all people, in all buildings, everywhere, every day,” the Healthy Buildings Team is leading research on how today’s built environments impact the health, productivity, and well-being of the people who inhabit them; as well as how future buildings can help us live healthier lives.

In the interest of defining their terms and presenting their research in a way that audiences outside academia can understand and incorporate into their work, the Healthy Buildings team have released an exhaustive list that details the simple foundations of making a building healthy.

The 9 foundations for healthy buildings are as follows:

Broadway Malyan to Design an Expansive "Health City" in Brisbane

18:00 - 27 June, 2018
Broadway Malyan to Design an Expansive "Health City" in Brisbane, Courtesy of Broadway Malyan
Courtesy of Broadway Malyan

For their first major project in Australia, international design firm Broadway Malyan has been selected by the developers behind Greater Springfield, the continent’s largest master-planned community, to design a new health-focused district around the site of Mater Private Hospital Springfield outside Brisbane. Already a healthcare hub containing the hospital, Aveo Springfield Retirement Village and a hotel, the proposed development would expand the so-called “health city” to include a hospital expansion, medical offices, residential and retail space, as well as facilities for wellness, education, research, hospitality, aged care, and start-up businesses.

5 Ways to Prepare for Architecture School Over the Summer

09:30 - 25 June, 2018
5 Ways to Prepare for Architecture School Over the Summer, © Neil Cornwall / Flickr / CC-BY-SA-3.0
© Neil Cornwall / Flickr / CC-BY-SA-3.0

This summer a brand new class of eager architectural hopefuls are preparing to start their lives in design at architecture schools around the world. Entering a studio environment for the first time brings an exciting set of new creative challenges, but this thrilling new world of architecture can often be tough to anticipate for those who have yet to begin their journey — leaving newcomers feeling unprepared and nervous on their first day.

Scarpa + Brooks Explore How Architecture Can Shape Memory

14:00 - 23 June, 2018

Why do we remember buildings, locations, and experiences? Even a place visited in our childhood can conjure emotions that make an impact on us through the memories they create. Angela Brooks and Larry Scarpa explain that the work of Brooks + Scarpa Architects aspires to make a lasting impression out of even a brief encounter. “We try to leave something behind,” says Scarpa, “something ingrained in people’s memory that sticks with them.”

© Ben Benschneider Courtesy of Brooks + Scarpa © John Linden © Tara Wucjik + 7

8 Treasured Historic Architecture Sites That Have Hosted Huge Rock Concerts

09:30 - 22 June, 2018
8 Treasured Historic Architecture Sites That Have Hosted Huge Rock Concerts , © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/thejointstaff/35142775934'>Flickr user thejointstaff</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Flickr user thejointstaff licensed under CC BY 2.0

Thanks to their loud, brash, and nocturnal nature, rock concerts are often held in dark bars and nightclubs designed to withstand the abuse of rowdy fans and guitar-smashing rockers. But as musicians earn a following, they eventually graduate from beer-soaked basements to prestigious theaters, outdoor amphitheaters, arenas, and stadiums. For performers and music fans alike, playing or attending a show in a space like Carnegie Hall, the Royal Albert Hall, Madison Square Garden or Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheater can be a momentous, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that ties together the sublime power that great music and architecture can both evoke. As rare as these opportunities are, an exclusive group of iconic musicians have managed to reach an even higher level of prestige by organizing one-off performances amid humanity’s most treasured historical sites—from the Acropolis and ancient Mayan cities to the Colosseum and the Eiffel Tower.

While these special concerts have given fans the chance to experience music history firsthand, many have also been mired in scandal as local officials and residents have raised concerns about potential damage to the sites or inappropriate commercial misuse of treasured cultural landmarks. Despite these legitimate and often justified concerns, these nine iconic sites have hosted some of the most ambitious concerts in the history of popular music: