Move Over, Green Walls: Living Canopy Comes to West Vancouver

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Imagine walking beneath an illuminated canopy of lush greenery, in the form of inverted pyramids sculpted to perfection. In early August 2014 visitors were welcomed by this succulent living roof to the Harmony Arts Festival in West Vancouver, British Columbia. Guests were guided through the fairgrounds beneath the 90-foot long canopy, creating an immersive sensory experience befitting the interdisciplinary creative arts festival. Designed by Matthew Soules Architecture and curated by the Museum of West VancouverVermilion Sands was created as a temporary for the ten day festival.

Submerge yourself in Vermilion Sands with photos and more info after the break.

The Vanglo House / LWPAC

© Ema Peter

Architects: LWPAC
Location: , BC, Canada
Architect And Designer: Oliver Lang, Cynthia Wilson Principal, Thomas Bocahut
Area: 172.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Ema Peter

Campos Leckie Studio: Adapting Materials Across Contexts

Vancouver, BC Based Architects Campos Lecki – The Zacatitos 03 House. Image © John Sinal

In the following interview, presented by ArchDaily Materials and originally published by Sixty7 Architecture Road, Canadian firm Campos Leckie Studio defines their process for designing site-specific, beautiful architecture that speaks for itself. Enjoy the firm’s stunning projects and read the full interview after the break. 

We asked Michael Leckie, one of the principals of Vancouver-based Campos Leckie Studio, about the importance of discovery in and the textural differences between projects. Your website states that your firm is committed to a rigorous process of discovery. How do you explain that to clients?

Process is extremely important in our work. When we meet with clients we do not immediately provide napkin sketches or an indication of what form the work will ultimately take on. Rather, we focus on the formulation of the ‘design problem’ and the conditions that establish the basis for exploration and discovery. These contextual starting points include the site, program, materiality, budget, as well as cultural reference points. This is challenging for some clients, as our culture generally conditions people to expect to see the final product before they commit to something.

Happy Cities and Stranger Danger: An Interview with DIALOG’s Bruce Haden

© Trevor Brady

In this article, first published by Indochino as “What makes some buildings happy?” architect Bruce Haden, principal at DIALOG in Vancouver, discusses why some places feel good to be in and why some just have that awkward, quiet feeling.

Award-winning architect and urban planner. Dad. Researcher on happy vs. lonely cities. We talked to Bruce Haden about why some places feel good to be in, and some just have that awwwkward, quiet feeling.

Bruce Haden has only been an architect and a bartender. So ask him what he likes about it, and his answer is he doesn’t really know anything else. In high school, he didn’t want to pick between calculus and woodshop, so he ended up in a profession that’s part , part engineering (and a fair amount of politics). Now, he works on a lot of large, public buildings. But he also spends a lot of time thinking about happy and lonely cities. He talks about how working with a client is like dating, why some buildings are worth being in and others are just empty, and whether adventure or luxury wins.

Esquimalt House / Mcleod Bovell

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Architects: Mcleod Bovell
Location: , BC, Canada
Area: 7,015 sqft
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Mcleod Bovell

Herzog & de Meuron to Design New Vancouver Art Gallery

Gallery Site

The Vancouver Art Gallery has unanimously appointed Herzog & de Meuron to design their new, 300,000 square foot gallery in downtown Vancouver. 

Selected from a shortlist of five - including Diller Scofidio + Renfro, KPMB Architects, SANAA , and Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects - Herzog & de Meuron was ultimately awarded the commission for their vision of the new Gallery and “proven ability to create innovative museum buildings that place prominence on artists and institutional mission.”

The new museum building, which will be the practice’s first Canadian project, will double the Gallery’s current space and accommodate for their expanding collections, indoor and outdoor exhibition space, and new educational programs. Conceptual designs are expected to be released in early 2015. 

Preview the portfolio that landed Herzog & de Meuron the commission, after the break…

Vancouver’s Granville Island: Setting the Standard for Urban Design

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In the 1970s, the principal designers at DIALOG, Norm Hotson and Joost Bakker, were commissioned by the Canadian government to redevelop Vancouver’s Granville Island, a former industrial site, into a people place. The architects envisioned a radically different type of waterfront characterized – not by beaches or parks – but by varied commercial and cultural programs. Today this iconic destination, popular with both citizens and tourists alike, is recognized as a pioneering precedent for urban development across Canada. In the video above, the DIALOG duo chronicles the success of the mixed-use , touching on how it has influenced the city of Vancouver as well as the firm’s more recent work.

S&S Studio / Scott and Scott Architects

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Architects: Scott and Scott Architects
Location: 299 East 19th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5V 3N2,
Area: 70.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Scott and Scott Architects

Janet Echelman’s Largest Aerial Sculpture To Premiere in Vancouver

© Ema Peter / Studio Echelman

American Artist Janet Echelman is to premiere her latest, and largest, sculpture in Vancouver. Widely known for her artistic ability to reshape urban airspace, Echelman’s sophisticated mixture of ancient craft and modern technology has led to collaborations with aeronautical and mechanical engineers, architects, lighting designers, landscape architects, and fabricators to “transform urban environments world wide with her net sculptures.” Using a light weight fibre to elevate her monumental “breathing” forms above the streets of urban centres, Echelman’s new sculpture will be of a size and scale never before attempted.

Rebirth of The York Theatre / Henriquez Partners Architects

© Ed White

Architects: Henriquez Partners Architects
Location: Vancouver, BC,
Area: 6171.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Ed White, Harold Kalman

Mozilla YVR / Hughes Condon Marler Architects

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Architects: Hughes Condon Marler Architects
Location: Gastown, , BC, Canada
Area: 6,250 sqft
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Hughes Condon Marler Architects

Harry Gugger Studio’s ‘The Exchange’ to Rise in Vancouver

Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio

Construction broke ground last month for ‘The Exchange’ tower in Vancouver, ’s first LEED Platinum heritage conversion and Harry Gugger Studio’s first North American building. The 31-floor office building resolves the strict urban regulations imposed on high-rise construction downtown and addresses the historical context by preserving and integrating the façade of the city’s historic Stock Exchange building.

Woodlands Community Garden Shed / Brendan Callander + Jason Pielak + Stella Cheung-Boyland

© Dave Delnea Images

Architects: Brendan Callander + Jason Pielak +
Location: , Canada
Photographs: Dave Delnea Images

University Boulevard Transit Shelters / PUBLIC Architecture + Communication

© Krista Jahnke

Architects: PUBLIC Architecture + Communication
Location: University Boulevard, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Team: John Wall, AIBC, Brian Wakelin, AIBC, Christopher Sklar, UBC Properties Trust, University of British Columbia
Area: 120.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Krista Jahnke , Courtesy of PUBLIC

BIG’s Beach + Howe Tower Wins Approval in Vancouver

© Luxigon

Bjarke Ingels Group ()’s 700,000 square foot Beach + Howe development has been approved by the Vancouver City Council. Though concerns still remain regarding the height of the 52-story tower – which is intended to become the city’s fourth tallest building – an overwhelming majority of the council and public seems to be enthusiastic about the project. 

“It meets the test at every respect — gorgeous architecture, turning a dead space into a vibrant public space with animation and job space. The housing is diverse and much needed… People have used the word iconic – I think it’s remarkable to combine so many elements on a tough site,” stated Mayor Gregor Robertson before the vote. “It’s an extraordinary project that deserves strong council support.”

Children’s Playhouse ‘Sam + Pam’ / Office of McFarlane Biggar Architects + Designers Inc.

© Latreille Delage

Architects: Office of McFarlane Biggar Architects + Designers Inc.
Location: Pacific National Exhibition, 2901 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V5K 5J1, Canada
Contractors: Kindred Construction
Year: 2013
Photographs: Latreille Delage

First Peoples House / Formline Architecture + Urbanism

© Nick Lehoux

Architects: Formline Architecture + Urbanism
Location: Vancouver,
Architect In Charge: Alfred Waugh
Team: Ken Wong, Adam Slavinski
Area: 1,196 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Nick Lehoux

BESTIE / Scott and Scott Architects

Courtesy of Scott and Scott Architects

Architects: Scott and Scott Architects
Location: ,
Area: 70 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Scott and Scott Architects