Ten Buildings Which Epitomize The Triumph Of Postmodernism

Via Archive of Affinities. Image © Nils-Ole Lund

Being such a recent movement in the international architectural discourse, the reach and significance of post-modernism can sometimes go unnoticed. In this selection, chosen by Adam Nathaniel Furman, the “incredibly rich, extensive and complex ecosystem of projects that have grown out of the initial explosion of from the 1960s to the early 1990s” are placed side by side for our delight.

From mosques that imagine an idyllic past, via Walt Disney’s Aladdin from the 1990s, to a theatre in Moscow that turns its façade into a constructivist collage of classical scenes, “there are categories in post-modernism to be discovered, and tactics to be learned.” These projects trace forms of complex stylistic figuration, from the high years of academic postmodernism, to the more popular of its forms that spread like wildfire in the latter part of the 20th century.

Lateral Office’s 2014 Venice Biennale ‘Arctic Adaptations’ Exhibition To Tour Canada

Lateral Office’s Arctic Adaptations exhibition, which was recognised with a Special Mention at the 2014 Venice Biennale, will travel make its debut in Canada at the Art Gallery this week before heading to Whitehouse, Vancouver, and . The exhibition “surveys a century of Arctic architecture, an urbanising present, and a projective near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut” though interactive models, photography, and topographical maps of the twenty five communities of the area, as well as Inuit carvers’ scale models of some of the most recognised buildings in the territory. In addition, it proposes a future of adaptive and responsive architecture for Canada’s northern territories.

VIDEO: Bjarke Ingels Walks Us Through The Design of Vancouver House

Taking the urban high-rise “one step further,” BIG’s (formerly known as the Beach and Howe Tower) is a gesamtkunstwerk – total work of art. Detailed to the smallest scale, the grand scheme makes use of a difficult site trisected by the Granville overpass and burdened by setbacks, transforming it into a “lively village” at the city’s gateway.

Learn how plans to revolutionize urban living by watching the video above.

East Van House / Splyce Design

© Ivan Hunter

Architects: Splyce Design
Location: , BC,
Area: 2300.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: Ivan Hunter

Inclusivity as Architectural Program: A Reflection on Vancouver’s Woodward’s Redevelopment Five Years On

Officially opened in 2010, the Woodward’s Redevelopment project designed by Vancouver based Henriquez Partners Architects and situated in the city’s Downtown Eastside (DTES), was a contentious proposal from the time of its inception, and has continued to be so in the almost five years since its completion. Yet as the large-scale mixed-use complex, and its role in the community, nears the first of many milestone anniversaries, it offers us a chance for critical reflection and allows for perceptions and understandings to be gathered and assessed.

What has made Woodward’s an interesting case study, however, is the project’s attempt to act as a model for responsible development with respect to the regeneration of its surrounding urban and community context. Yet there has also been much criticism, with fears over rapid gentrification and claims that it has displaced some of the community’s most at-risk residents. For managing partner Gregory Henriquez, however, it was seen as an opportunity to introduce a place of inclusivity into the neighbourhood and as a chance to “share a portion of the wealth created in real estate development to support the greater good.”

430 House / D’Arcy Jones Architecture

© Sama Jim Canzian

Architects: D’Arcy Jones Architecture
Location: , BC, Canada
Area: 2450.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Sama Jim Canzian

Winners Announced for Architecture for Humanity Vancouver’s “NEXT BIG ONE” Competition

“Modular Landscapes” was designed in response to the 2011 Japanese earthquake. Image Courtesy of Vancouver Chapter

Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter has unveiled the winners of “NEXT BIG ONE,” an open call for design solutions to high-magnitude earthquake and tsunami events that plague around the world. Project teams were challenged to propose a solution that ”can mitigate natural disasters while simultaneously providing community permanence.”

A jury comprised of leading architects and professionals from Architecture Research Office (Stephen Cassell), Perkins + Will (Susan Gushe), Bing Thom Architects (Eileen Keenan), Scott & Scott Architects (David Scott), and the City of Vancouver (Doug Smith) evaluated the projects. Entries were evaluated based on three key criteria: the exemplification of innovation in disaster design, promotion of community resiliency before and after disasters, and compliance with multi-hazard parameters for worst-case disaster scenarios.

Paris Block Paris Annex / Gair Williamson Architect + Ankenman Marchand Architects

© Ed White

Architects: Gair Williamson Architect, Ankenman Marchand Architects
Location: 53 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1G4, Canada
Design Team: Gair Williamson, Jenny Chow, Brian Liston, François Marchand, Julien Leger
Year: 2012
Photographs: Ed White, Courtesy of +

Ecological Densification Four Townhouses / SHAPE Architecture

Courtesy of

Architects: SHAPE Architecture
Location: Vancouver, BC,
Project Team: Nick Sully, Hanna Teicher, Matthew Traub
Sustainability: Canadian Green Building Council Sustainable Project Award, Designed to LEED Platinum guidelines, Energuide 86
Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of SHAPE Architecture

AD Round Up: Canadian Architecture to Be Thankful For

The Crystal, extension to the Royal Ontario Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind. Image © Andrew Rowat

Today marks Canadian Thanksgiving, and to celebrate the occasion we’ve rounded up some of ’s best architecture. Our five selections represent five Canadian cities, each with a unique architectural sensibility. We begin in Toronto with the Royal Ontario Museum addition by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a striking intervention using prisms of glass and steel fused to a 102-year-old museum structure; next we go to Montréal for Habitat 67 by Moshe Safdie, an interlocking modular housing project designed for the World Exposition of 1967; to Calgary for Santiago Calatrava‘s understated Peace Bridge, a stunning glass-encased red lightning bolt spanning the city’s widest waterway; then to Winnipeg‘s Old Market Square Stage by emerging firm 5468796 Architecture, a chameleonic performance space wrapped by a mesh curtain of steel cubes; and finally to the outskirts of Vancouver for the Richmond Olympic Oval, a masterpiece of engineering and the centre of attention during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. Enjoy, eh.

RISE Competition Seeks Ideas to Combat Sea Level Rise in Vancouver

Downtown Vancouver. Image Courtesy of SFU

How will affect Metro Vancouver and what can we do about it? Take a look at the #RISEIDEAS competition from SFU Public Square – an open ideas competition with a Grand Prize of $35,000 to find innovative ways to address sea level rise. Form a team of one to four people, submit your idea online, and you could take home the cash, rub shoulders with experts at the October 19 public day, and win free event tickets. The deadline for competition submissions is October 6, 2014. Check out the website for all the details.

Move Over, Green Walls: Living Canopy Comes to West Vancouver

Courtesy of Matthew Soules Architecture

Imagine walking beneath an illuminated canopy of lush greenery, in the form of inverted pyramids sculpted to perfection. In early August 2014 visitors were welcomed by this succulent living roof to the Harmony Arts Festival in West Vancouver, British Columbia. Guests were guided through the fairgrounds beneath the 90-foot long canopy, creating an immersive sensory experience befitting the interdisciplinary creative arts festival. Designed by Matthew Soules Architecture and curated by the Museum of West VancouverVermilion Sands was created as a temporary for the ten day festival.

Submerge yourself in Vermilion Sands with photos and more info after the break.

The Vanglo House / LWPAC

© Ema Peter

Architects: LWPAC
Location: , BC, Canada
Architect And Designer: Oliver Lang, Cynthia Wilson Principal, Thomas Bocahut
Area: 172.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Ema Peter

Campos Leckie Studio: Adapting Materials Across Contexts

, BC Based Architects Campos Lecki – The Zacatitos 03 House. Image © John Sinal

In the following interview, presented by ArchDaily Materials and originally published by Sixty7 Architecture Road, Canadian firm Campos Leckie Studio defines their process for designing site-specific, beautiful architecture that speaks for itself. Enjoy the firm’s stunning projects and read the full interview after the break. 

We asked Michael Leckie, one of the principals of Vancouver-based Campos Leckie Studio, about the importance of discovery in design and the textural differences between projects. Your website states that your firm is committed to a rigorous process of discovery. How do you explain that to clients?

Process is extremely important in our work. When we meet with clients we do not immediately provide napkin sketches or an indication of what form the work will ultimately take on. Rather, we focus on the formulation of the ‘design problem’ and the conditions that establish the basis for exploration and discovery. These contextual starting points include the site, program, materiality, budget, as well as cultural reference points. This is challenging for some clients, as our culture generally conditions people to expect to see the final product before they commit to something.

Happy Cities and Stranger Danger: An Interview with DIALOG’s Bruce Haden

© Trevor Brady

In this article, first published by Indochino as “What makes some buildings happy?” architect Bruce Haden, principal at DIALOG in Vancouver, discusses why some places feel good to be in and why some just have that awkward, quiet feeling.

Award-winning architect and urban planner. Dad. Researcher on happy vs. lonely . We talked to Bruce Haden about why some places feel good to be in, and some just have that awwwkward, quiet feeling.

Bruce Haden has only been an architect and a bartender. So ask him what he likes about it, and his answer is he doesn’t really know anything else. In high school, he didn’t want to pick between calculus and woodshop, so he ended up in a profession that’s part art, part engineering (and a fair amount of politics). Now, he works on a lot of large, public buildings. But he also spends a lot of time thinking about happy and lonely cities. He talks about how working with a client is like dating, why some buildings are worth being in and others are just empty, and whether adventure or luxury wins.

Esquimalt House / Mcleod Bovell

Courtesy of

Architects: Mcleod Bovell
Location: Vancouver, BC,
Area: 7,015 sqft
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Mcleod Bovell

Herzog & de Meuron to Design New Vancouver Art Gallery

Site

The Art Gallery has unanimously appointed Herzog & de Meuron to design their new, 300,000 square foot gallery in downtown Vancouver. 

Selected from a shortlist of five - including Diller Scofidio + Renfro, KPMB Architects, SANAA , and Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects - Herzog & de Meuron was ultimately awarded the commission for their vision of the new Gallery and “proven ability to create innovative museum buildings that place prominence on artists and institutional mission.”

The new museum building, which will be the practice’s first Canadian project, will double the Gallery’s current space and accommodate for their expanding collections, indoor and outdoor exhibition space, and new educational programs. Conceptual designs are expected to be released in early 2015. 

Preview the portfolio that landed Herzog & de Meuron the commission, after the break…

Vancouver’s Granville Island: Setting the Standard for Urban Design

YouTube Preview Image

In the 1970s, the principal designers at DIALOG, Norm Hotson and Joost Bakker, were commissioned by the Canadian government to redevelop ’s Granville Island, a former industrial site, into a people place. The architects envisioned a radically different type of waterfront characterized – not by beaches or parks – but by varied commercial and cultural programs. Today this iconic destination, popular with both citizens and tourists alike, is recognized as a pioneering precedent for urban development across Canada. In the video above, the DIALOG duo chronicles the success of the mixed-use design, touching on how it has influenced the city of Vancouver as well as the firm’s more recent work.