Mexico City Shortlists Seven Architects for Major Airport Expansion

Zagreb Airport Competition Proposal / ZHA ©

Zaha Hadid, Norman Foster and Richard Rogers are among seven international practices listed to compete for a 5,000 hectare expansion that hopes to “alleviate severe congestion” at the Mexico City airport. With each team led by Mexican firms, the shortlisted architects, which also include SOM, Gensler, and Teodoro González de León with Taller de Arquitectura X, have been asked to envision a 70-gate, phased expansion capable of hosting 40-million passengers per year. A schematic masterplan has been provided by Arup. Completion of the first phases is tentatively planned for 2018. 

Richard Rogers’ Pre-Fab Y-Cube Takes on UK Housing Crisis

The Y-Cube Deployed. Image Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

The Y-Cube, a £30,000 factory-built 26 square meter flat which can be easily transported and craned into place, has been prototyped and successfully tested in the UK. The YMCA asked Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners to create the Y-Cube, an affordable alternative for residents moving on from the non-profit’s hostels. And now, the YMCA wants more of these one-bedroom dwellings.

“The beauty is that the units can be moved off site as quickly as they are installed,” says Andy Redfearn of the YMCA, “as we operate on short-term leases – we expect people to stay [in the Y-Cube] for between three to five years, giving them time to skill up and save for a deposit.”

Six of Britain’s Best Shortlisted for Crystal Palace Project

Aerial view of site for Crystal Palace rebuild. Image Courtesy of ZhongRong Group

After an open competition that sought to attract “the very best British architecture can offer,” six architects – including Zaha Hadid and Richard Rogers – have been selected as the potential architects of the project to rebuild the Crystal Palace in south London. See the full shortlist after the break.

Rogers Stirk Harbour Unveils Design for Venezuela’s National Football Stadium

Courtesy of RSHP

Following our recent news that confirmed Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) will oversee the design and construction of two new stadiums within Caracas’ Hugo Chavez Park, details have emerged regarding the Estadio Nacional de Fútbol de Venezuela. Designed by RSHP, in collaboration with Arup and Schlaich Bergermann und Partners, the project will be the practice’s first ever football stadium.

Richard Rogers to Design Two New Stadiums for Hugo Chávez Park

The proposed football stadium. Image Courtesy of the municipality of Caracas

On January 17th, the mayor of Caracas, Jorge Rodriguez, and British architect Richard Rogers signed a contract that confirms Rogers will oversee the design and construction of two new stadiums within ”Hugo Chavez” Park. Both stadiums should be completed by 2015.

The 200-hectare ”Hugo Chavez” Park will be located around the race course and the Museum Alejandro Otero (MAO). The project, which began in April 2013, includes the construction of a football stadium with capacity for 50,000 people and a baseball stadium with capacity for 45,000, plus a multipurpose gym and the new headquarters of the Bolivarian University of Venezuela.

Nuovo Centro Civico in Scandicci / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

© Alessandro Ciampi

Architects: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Location: Scandicci Florence, Italy
Local Architect: DA.Studio
Project Manager: Federica Barni
Area: 2013.0 sqm
Year: 15500
Photographs: Alessandro Ciampi

Rogers Stirk Harbour Announced as Winner of LSE Competition

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (Team E). Image Courtesy of LSA /

Shortly after the jury demanded further work to be done on the shortlisted proposals, The School of Economics (LSE) has selected Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) to design the new Global Centre for the Social Sciences. Besting proposals from OMA, Hopkins, Heneghan Peng and Grafton, RSHP’s winning design was also voted the public’s favorite by an overwhelming margin.

LSE Asks for ‘Further Work’ To Be Done on Shortlisted Designs

Team B. Image Courtesy of LSE /

Following the announcement last month that the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) had shortlisted five designs for their new Global Centre for Social Sciences (GCSS) in London’s Aldwych, they have now revealed that “there’s not one really outstanding scheme” and “there’s some further work to do by the practices and the LSE.” Therefore contestants Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, OMAHopkins ArchitectsGrafton Architects, and Henegham Peng Architects must reconsider their proposed designs

Dolls’ House Designs for KIDS Unveiled

Coffey Architects. Image Courtesy of A Dolls

Inspired by the dolls’ house that Edwin Lutyens designed for The British Empire Exhibition in 1922, twenty British practices are each designing a contemporary dolls’ house in aid of the disabled childrens’ charity KIDS. Each version will sit on a 750mm square plinth to be auctioned at Bonham’s on the 11th November and contains one feature which would make life easier for a disabled child. Among the participating practices is Zaha Hadid Architects and Rogers Stirk Harbour + PartnersFAT will also be working with Turner Prize recipient Grayson Perry CBE, and Studio Egret West with artist Andrew Logan.

See all the entries after the break…

Shortlist Announced for LSE Global Centre for Social Sciences

Team C. Image Courtesy of LSA / RIBA

The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) have unveiled five shortlisted proposals for the new £90 million Global Centre for Social Sciences (GCSS) in London’s Aldwych. The competition, which has attracted designs from the likes of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and OMA, will be the school’s “biggest ever building project” and is set to “transform” the world-leading institution.  entrants include Hopkins Architects, Grafton Architects, and Henegham Peng Architects. See the anonymous proposals after the break…

‘London As It Could Be Now’: Reconnecting Londoners with the Tidal Thames

The Thames Baths Project. Image © Studio Octopi / / Jonathan Cook Landscape

Five proposals for reconnecting Londoners with the River Thames have gone on display at London’s Royal Academy of Arts (RA). The competition, organised by the Architecture Foundation, “launched an open call for multidisciplinary design teams to put forward new ideas and visions for self-selected sites along the Tidal Thames” earlier this year. The five selected teams were shortlisted earlier this year and recently discussed their designs at a public design workshop. The schemes are now being exhibited as part of the Richard Rogers RA: Inside Out exhibition.

Read extracts of the proposals after the break…

Review: ‘Richard Rogers: Inside Out’ at the Royal Academy

Zip-Up House Concept drawing (1968) – courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners. Image © Richard and Su Rogers

“Architecture is too complex to be solved by any one person.”

Richard Rogers is an architect who understands the significance of collaboration. As a man with an intense social mind and a thirst for fairness in architectural and urban design, Rogers’ substantial portfolio of completed and proposed buildings is driven by the Athenian citizen’s oath of “I shall leave this city not less but more beautiful than I found it.”

In honor of his success, London’s Royal Academy (RA) is currently playing host to a vast retrospective of Richard Rogers’ work, from his collaborations with Norman Foster and Renzo Piano, to the large-scale projects that define Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) today. The RA’s extensive has been condensed into a series of motifs that have defined his architectural work, punctuated by memorabilia which offer personal insights into how Rogers’ career has been shaped by the people he’s worked with and the projects that he has worked on.

Continue after the break for a selection of highlights from the exhibition. 

20 Architects Design a Dolls’ House for KIDS

Inside Out House. Image © Coffey Architects

Inspired by the dolls’ house that Edwin Lutyens designed for The British Empire in 1922, twenty British practices are each designing a contemporary dolls’ house in aid of the disabled childrens’ charity KIDS. Each version will sit on a 750mm square plinth to be exhibited during this year’s London Design Festival (14th – 21st September, 2013) before being auctioned. Each design must contain “a unique feature to make life easier for a child who is disabled.”

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ Unveil Homeshell Prototype at London’s RA

© Ana Au, via Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) have unveiled a three story flat-pack house in the courtyard of London’s (). Designed as an answer to the UK’s urgent need for cost-effective housing, the prototype demonstrates a method of building “high-quality, well-designed houses significantly cheaper than other traditional methods of construction.”

RSHP, known for their large-scale projects, envisage Homeshell as part of a wider platform which could encompass apartments, schools, factories and healthcare centers.

AD Classics: Inmos Microprocessor Factory / Richard Rogers Partnership

Courtesy of

Having made his name with the Centre Georges Pompidou and the Lloyd’s building, Richard Rogers – who turns 80 today – was commissioned in 1980 to design the Inmos microprocessor factory in , Wales. The factory’s design was targeted for the delicate process of microchip assembly, which requires a clean and controlled space. Built at the time of the computer-chip boom, construction had to be completed within one year, a factor which would greatly influence the design.

Rogers’s response, based on his previous high-tech designs, was to move the services to the outside of the building and split the interior into ‘clean’ spaces for microchip assembly and ‘dirty’ spaces for other tasks. Moreover, Rogers opted for an off-site prefabrication of parts, which not only increased the speed of construction, but would also allow for the factory to be easily replicated as a model.

Read more after the  break…

Happy Birthday Richard Rogers!

© 2013 LLP

Richard Rogers, one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, turns 80 today. Rogers made his name in the 70s and 80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd’s Bank in London. His early work utilized what could be described as his signature style, with a highly expressive structure and the building’s services on the exterior of the building.

In the 1990s Rogers became involved in British politics, sitting in the House of Lords as a Labour Peer (his full title is Baron Rogers of Riverside). This led to an invitation by the government to set up the Urban Task Force, which in 1998 conducted a review into the causes of urban decay and outlined a vision for the future of British Cities in the paper ‘Towards an Urban Renaissance.’ For 8 years he was also chief advisor on architecture and urbanism for the Mayor of London.

In more recent years Rogers has continued to produce work of great merit, winning the Stirling Prize in 2006 and 2009. He was also awarded the Pritzker Prize in 2007. On the occasion of his 80th Birthday, we invite you to look through his remarkable body of work:

Ask Richard Rogers Anything (For One Hour Only)

© 2013 Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners LLP

Tomorrow (July 19th) at 1pm GMT, The Guardian will be hosting a live webchat with renowned English architect Richard Rogers. The soon to be 80-year old has already begun celebrating with a exhibition on his work at the Royal Academy. You can keep the Rogers-fest going by heading to The Guardian’s site and posting your questions in the comments section. The next day, you’ll be able to see responses from the architect himself. So, what would you ask Rogers? 

In Progress: The Leadenhall Building / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Architects: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Location: , , United Kingdom
Structural Engineer: Arup
Landscape Architect: Edco Design London
Client: The British Land Company plc
Area: 84,424 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Courtesy of The Leadenhall Building Development Company

Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners’ Leadenhall Building became the tallest building in the City of London when it topped out on June 18th. The 50 story tower opposite Lloyd’s of London rises to a height of 224.5 meters 802 feet), its slender form creating its own distinctive profile within an emerging cluster London. The building’s tapering profile is prompted by a requirement to respect views of St Paul’s Cathedral, in particular from Fleet Street. The building comprises a number of distinct architectural elements that provide clarity to the composition both as a whole and as a legible expression of its constituent parts. These elements include the primary stability structure, the ladder frame, the office floor plates, the northern support core, the external envelope and the public realm.

More images and video of The Leadenhall Building after the break…