Zaha Hadid’s 2020 Olympic Stadium to Be “Scaled Down”

© ZHA

UPDATE: The Washington Post reports that ’s minister of education, Hakubun Shimomura, has announced a plan to trim the budget proposed for the Olympic stadium (now expected to cost $3 billion) designed by . While he did not reveal the details of the scale-down, he maintained that the “design concept will be kept.” 

Pritzker Prize laureate Fumihiko Maki has rallied together a number of Japanese architects – including Sou Fujimoto, Toyo Ito and Kengo Kuma – to oppose the massive scale of Zaha Hadid’s competition-winning National Stadium. Planned to be Tokyo’s main venue for the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic games, Hadid’s 290,000 square meter stadium is accused of being “too big and too artificial” for the surrounding context. 

Fumihiko Maki Unveils New United Nations Tower

Courtesy of DNAinfoNY

Almost sixty years after Wallace K. Harrison was invited to design the United Nations Secretariat Building in , plans have been unveiled for another UN skyscraper designed by Fumihiko Maki which would “consolidate currently scattered operations into a single structure that would rise on the western portion of the Robert Moses Playground, on First Avenue between East 41st and 42nd streets.”

Fumihiko Maki to design Cultural Center and University in London

© Imogene Tudor

Japanese modernist Fumihiko Maki has been chosen to design a cultural and university complex on a 67-acre Kings Cross development in London. As reported by the Evening Standard, the 84-year-old, Pritzker Prize-winning architect will design two buildings for the Aga Khan Development Network – an organization who leads the world’s 15 million Ismaili Muslims.

The two projects are among five, totaling a half million square feet, that are being commissioned by the Network at Kings Cross. It is unsaid of who will design the other three buildings. However, preliminary designs studies are under way and formal appointments will be announced shortly.

Milestone for 4 World Trade

Construction workers watch as the beam rises 977 feet via The Daily News/David Handschuh

Yesterday, the final steel beam rose 977 feet into the air and was placed atop 4 World Trade Center – the 72-story tower designed by Pritzker Prize-winning Japanese architect . As gospel singer BeBe Winans sang “God Bless America”, the 8 ton beam, signed by all members of the team and adorned with an American flag, reached its final destination atop the city’s sixth tallest tower.

At over 80 years of age, Maki is making his debut in an elegant manner.  The tower was designed to serve as a “respectful backdrop” to the National September 11 Memorial and not to compete with 1 World Trade.  ”This is a special place with a sacred meaning and we felt we had to be respectful,” explained Osamu Sassa, Maki’s project architect, to The New York Times.   Such a ideology offers a strong contrast with the other architectural statements that will eventually rise as part of the World Trade Center complex, such as Norman Foster’s 2 World Trade and Richard Roger’s 3 World Trade.   While the minimalism of Maki may have kept the design under the radar during its design and construction stages, the grace of its simplicity will craft a dignified presence while visiting the site.  ”The design of the tower at 150 Greenwich has two fundamental elements –  a ‘minimalist’ tower that achieves an appropriate presence, quiet but with dignity, and a ‘podium’ that becomes a catalyst for activating the surrounding urban streetscape as part of the revitalization of lower Manhattan,” explained Maki.

More about 4 World Trade after the break. 

AD Classics: Makuhari Messe / Fumihiko Maki

Photo by Chi (Back in Oz) - http://www.flickr.com/photos/chiszeo/

Formerly known as the Nippon Convention Center, the Makuhari Messe (derived from the German word meaning “trade fair”) is the second largest convention center in behind only Big Sight.  Makuhari Messe was designed by famous Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki and was completed in 1989 with the intention of establishing the area of Makuhari as an architectural destination separate from Tokyo proper.

‘Regional Design Revolution Ecology Matters’ 2011 AIA National Convention

The 2011 AIA National Convention, Regional Design Revolution Ecology Matters is fast approaching.  Next week, May 12th-14th architects will be heading to the Gulf Coast where host city New Orleans, Louisiana will offer over 200+ programs, including pre-convention workshops, theme presentations, continuing education learning units and expo education. and Jeb Brugmann will provide the keynotes, and Fumihiko Maki, Hon FAIA, will be in attendance as he is the 2011 AIA Gold Medal recipient.

The AIA New Orleans chapter will also be providing a variety of educational tours that explore the soulful flavor of the city’s architecture. There is still time to register for the convention, more information can be found here.

ArchDaily won’t be missing out on this exciting annual event. We will be in attendance interviewing some of your (and our) favorite architects and reporting on the Convention happenings.  Be sure to stay tuned to ArchDaily.com next week!

Fumihiko Maki 2011 AIA Gold Medal Winner

© Imogene Tudor

In recognition of his contributions to architecture in both theory and practice Fumihiko Maki was recently named the 2011 AIA Gold Medal Winner. Maki, arguably one of ’s most distinguished living architects, will be honored with the award in New Orleans at the AIA National Convention.

“He has a unique style of Modernism that is infused with an ephemeral quality and elegance which reflects his Japanese origin. What stands out most about Mr. Maki is the consistent quality of his work at the highest caliber and the creation of ineffable atmospheres; his buildings convey a quiet and elegant moment of reflection,” colleague Toshiko Mori, FAIA, said of Maki.

Also noteworthy is Fumihiko Maki’s close working relationship with each employee. Forty architects, urban planners, and administrative personnel, make up the staff of Maki and Associates, which is the type of working environment where each member is involved in and responsible for all aspects of projects. Maki himself is at the head of each commission and maintains the leadership role through to completion, including construction supervision. Established in 1965 Maki and Associates throughout its 42 years has been based in Tokyo, Japan. Maki studied at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and Cranbrook Academy of Art, but has spent the majority of his life in Japan.

Examples of Maki’s work include:

The Spiral in Tokyo, Japan
The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, California
The Kaze-No-Oka Crematorium in Kyushu, Japan
Triad in Nagano, Japan
The Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Maki is the 67th AIA Gold Medalist and joins a prestigious list including Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Renzo Piano, I.M. Pei, Cesar Pelli, Santiago Calatrava and last year’s recipient, Peter Bohlin, FAIA.

He has received numerous awards including the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1993.