70 Documentaries By Spanish And Portuguese Architects To Be Exhibited In Beijing

LaMIPA, a non-profit “architectural exchange platform” dedicated to exhibiting art and culture, will be part of the 2014 Beijing Design Week (BJDW) with a launch event on September 25th 2014 and following events on the 26th and 28th. Exhibiting seventy documentaries by Spanish and Portuguese architects, and organised in conjunction with the Spanish and Portuguese Embassies to , the unique audiovisual LaMIPA collection will be part of the main section of the Beijing Design Week festival. Alongside the exhibition a series of lectures from a number of renowned practices including Souto de Moura and OAB Ferrater will also be taking place.

KAMJZ Reveals Proposal for Shenzhen Bay Super City Masterplan

Courtesy of KAMJZ Architects

Already one of the most remarkable examples of China’s urban growth in the last 30 years, Shenzhen will soon also host a bustling new financial district. The Shenzhen Bay Super City Masterplan aims to create a new city center with top headquarter offices for global corporations and related venues for international conferences, exhibitions, and programs. KAMJZ Architects has recently revealed their competition entry with a plan that proposes a more sustainable city center through the design of a radical new typology for office towers. Read on after the break to learn more about the proposed masterplan.

Álvaro Siza, Carlos Castanheira and Wang Shu Design Museum for Hangzhou Art Academy

After inaugurating his first building in China – “The Building on the Water” – Álvaro Siza has just announced his second project in the country, again in collaboration with Portuguese architect Carlos Castanheira. This time the two architects will develop a museum for Hangzhou Art Academy.

The new museum – which will have approximately 15,000 sqm, a total area similar to that of Serralves Foundation building – will host an important collection of pieces from the famous German school of arts and design, Bauhaus, founded by Walter Gropius in 1919.

Home Cafes / Penda

© Zhi Xia

Architects: Penda
Location: Beijing, Beijing,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Zhi Xia, Fei Tang Precht

Ban House / Zhang Dongguang + Liu Wenjuan

© Liu Wenjuan

Architects: Zhang Dongguang, Liu Wenjuan
Location: , Shaanxi, China
Area: 80.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Liu Wenjuan

Master Plan Revealed for Binhai Eco City in Tianjin

Courtesy of Holm Architecture Office

Holm Architecture Office and AI - along with landscape architects Kragh Berglund – have been named shared winners of the Eco City Binhai Master Plan. Located outside Tianjin in Northern China, the project will consist of a new Central Business District and five new buildings. Learn more about this plan after the break.

MARK Magazine #51

Courtesy of MARK Magazine

Articles on ’s building boom often highlight the property bubble, megalomaniac planners, governmental corruption and private graft, substandard building practices and the destruction of the nation’s cultural heritage.

In Mark #51, we interviewed four Chinese architects on four aspects of China’s building practices to reveal the mechanisms at the foundation of this unedifying image. Li Hu offers his thoughts on architecture, Liu Yuyang on urban planning, Li Xiaodong on aesthetics and Liu Jiakun on construction processes. What can we learn from their experience?

The Building on the Water / Álvaro Siza + Carlos Castanheira

© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG

Architects: Álvaro Siza, Carlos Castanheira
Location: Huai’an, Jiangsu,
Architects In Charge: Álvaro Siza e Carlos Castanheira
Local Partner: United Architects & Engineers Co., Ltda
Project Management: Stephen Want & Richard Wang
Client: Por-Shih, Diretor da Shihlien Chemical Industrial Jiangsu Co., Ltd.
Project Area: 11000 sqm
Project Year: 2014
Photographs: Fernando Guerra | FG + SG

Emperor Qianmen Hotel / asap

© Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Architects: asap
Location: Dongcheng, Beijing, China
Lead Architect: Adam Sokol
Area: 7500.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Mecanoo Begins Work on Vast Cultural Centre in Shenzhen

Courtesy of Mecanoo / Christopher Malheiros Architectural Visualization

Dutch based practice Mecanoo, nominated for this year’s RIBA Stirling Prize for the Library of Birmingham, have begun work on vast cultural centre in Shenzhen marking their first project to break ground on Chinese soil. Comprising of a large public art gallery, a science museum, a youth centre, and a book mall, the 95,000 square metre development will strengthen Longgang District’s identity by “providing citizens and visitors with a renewed sense of place.” Forming a dynamic link between the high-rise of the city’s commercial district and the open spaces of Longcheng Park, the four sculpted forms emerge from the ground to create a series of arches and sheltered spaces to facilitate public events.

See the full set of images and an illustrative film after the break.

Shanghai MOCA / Atelier Liu Yuyang Architects

© Jeremy San

Architects: Atelier Liu Yuyang Architects
Location: People’s Park, 231 Nanjing West Road, People’s Square, Huangpu, , 200000
Design Team: Liu Yuyang, Keith Yee, Tynnon Chow, Larry Tsoi
Area: 3900.0 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Jeremy San

Broadway Malyan Designs New Urban District in Chengdu

Courtesy of

Broadway Malyan has been awarded a commission to design the initial phase of a new, iconic urban district in Chengdu in Western China. The Chengdu Creative Centre will be the first landmark in a larger master plan for a high-tech mixed use and business park, set to be called Tianfu New Town.

Committed to setting a high standard of environmentally conscious and sustainable design for the region, Chengdu Creative Centre and the future Tianfu New Town district aim to cut current energy consumption standards in half. The entire complex will be composed of interconnected office, retail, and public green space anchored by a striking central retail tower, 110 meters tall.

Fernando Guerra Captures Álvaro Siza’s First Project in China

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

We are excited to share these exclusive photos taken by Fernando Guerra | FG+SG of Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza’s first project in : The Building on the Water.

Evoking the image of a dragon perched elegantly on water, the contours of the building seem to move gently in a perfect synergy between local symbolism and the subtle elements of Siza. Snaking around, the form escapes formal convention, emerging as an autonomous entity that contrasts with the orthogonal form of the factory complex. The delicate transition geometry of curves and bridges that connect the different spaces and pavements makes this project one of the most striking examples of Siza’s distinctive architecture. 

Through different shades, reflections and his unmatched composition of light and shadows, Fernando Guerra’s striking images show a poetic scene and the perfect relationship between the building and its environment. We can envision the changes and transitions that the white concrete building goes through as a result of its contact with the water throughout the day.

Read on after the break to see the exclusive images…

RMJM Designs Fish-Inspired Tower Clad with Aluminum Scales

View from Below. Image Courtesy of

RMJM‘s Shenzhen studio has just been awarded the contract to build a 93 metre public observation tower inspired by the importance of water in the historic Doumen District, Guangdong Province, China. Perched at the confluence of two rivers, the Doumen Observation Tower will rise from the waterfront of the Zhuhai, and is inspired by the form of a fish soaring above the water, clad in aluminum scales to protect from the hot Chinese sun. The tower will occupy a minimal footprint and will be surrounded by a large public plaza.

Check out the complete specs of Doumen Observation Tower after the break. 

The Chinese Dream: Original Architecture Not Included

Western-styled developments are increasingly popular in China, such as this suburb of . Image © Flickr CC User Brian Yap

Looking for your dream home? Picket fence, driveway (sedan included), basketball net, and terracotta pots complete with flowers in bloom, available now in the quiet neighbourhood of Rancho Santa Fe in Shanghai, China. According to this article in The Guardian, ”The Chinese Dream” is currently sweeping the People’s Republic, with Western planning models replicated with identical ineffective results. The article offers an intimate insight into the role of American architectural fetishism in modern China, and how the government is now fighting to curb the trend. Read the complete article here.

Daqing Left Bank City / A-ASTERISK

© Misae Hiromatsu

Architects: A-ASTERISK
Location: Daqing, Heilongjiang,
Architects In Charge: Nakamura Nobuhiro, Qin Yi, Shigeno Yuji, Wang Wenping, He Zengcai
Architecture Design:
Area: 200413.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Misae Hiromatsu

Qiqihaer Hezhitang Hot Spring / A-ASTERISK

© Misae Hiromatsu

Architects: A-ASTERISK
Location: Qiqihar, Heilongjiang,
Architects In Charge: Nakamura Nobuhiro, Qin Yi, Shigeno Yuji, Lai Jie, Wang Wenping, He Zengcai.
Area: 11357.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Misae Hiromatsu

Interview with Qi Xin of Qi Xin Architects and Engineers

Olympic Park Siheyuan / Qi Xin Architects and Engineers. Image © Pier Alessio Rizzardi

Architecture is not important. You can make a microclimate or situation, but you cannot have more influence about life or the urban situation, it’s just a very small operation you are working on, and you cannot control the situation of the city.. But even if you are just working on a single object here, you can always try to have more or less a positive influence on the city, you can always contribute in your way to the city, to the citizens. But in a larger view it’s not that important; it’s you or somebody else. The people are happy or not, their happiness is not relying on your architecture.” – Qi Xin, , 2013

Shedding light on topics from China‘s rapid urbanization to the issue of copycat architecture, this interview of Chinese architect Qi Xin conducted by Pier Alessio Rizzardi questions the role of architecture in Chinese society, and reveals the mindset of the modern Chinese architect. Qi Xin’s answers challenge many of the myths surrounding Chinese architecture, often through one-line gems such as “what is permanent for Chinese people is the spirit, not material,” and “the most important thing is that we don’t know where we are going… we are making the future cities.”