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New York's 1851 Landmark, the Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava, Burns in Fire

16:00 - 2 May, 2016

A photo posted by SWEENEY ART NYC (@sssweeney) on

The Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava, a New York landmark built in 1851 by Richard Upjohn, burned Sunday night in a fire after more than 700 parishioners celebrated Easter, reports NBC New York. Originally known as Trinity Chapel, the cathedral was created as satellite location for Trinity Church at Wall Street and Broadway in Lower Manhattan, also designed by Upjohn, after parishioners began to settle farther from the original location. The church was later joined by a Clergy House and the Trinity Chapel School in an ecclesiastical complex, but in 1943 the chapel and neighbors were sold to the Serbian Orthodox Church. The cathedral, stretching between 25th and 26th Street, was nearly 180 feet long, and had one of the largest hammerbeam roofs in the city. The New York Landmarks Conservancy partnered with the church for a 2002-03 restoration of the building's facade and roof. The four-alarm fire that was contained by Monday morning is under investigation as suspicious.

Architecture Ranked as 10th Best Entry-Level Job out of 109 Professions

12:00 - 2 May, 2016
Architecture Ranked as 10th Best Entry-Level Job out of 109 Professions, © wavebreakmedia via Shutterstock
© wavebreakmedia via Shutterstock

Architects are famously cynical about the long hours and over-education required for what can be a thankless career. But in a recent study conducted by WalletHub, “2016’s Best & Worst Entry-Level Jobs”, recent grads and seasoned professionals alike may be surprised to find that “architect” is ranked 10th out of 109 evaluated professions. Read on to find out how they calculated their result.

Federico Babina's ARCHICARDS Reimagines Architecture's Famous Faces as Playing Cards

11:30 - 2 May, 2016

"I always liked play as a form of learning; toys are often a prelude to serious ideas," says Federico Babina about his latest series of illustrations, titled ARCHICARDS. "The game can also be a thought experiment. I'm interested in playing with architecture's seriousness and illustration's lightheartedness."

Babina's illustrations turn 12 of the architecture world's most recognizable faces into card-game caricatures, accompanied by the designs and symbols that most characterize their design style. Whether it's the dislocated planes of Mies van der Rohe (a Jack), Queen Zaha Hadid's jagged curves, or the modulor man that accompanies Le Corbusier - who is, of course, a king - Babina's playing cards are loaded with design references. They might indeed have some educational value, but they are mostly, as Babina points out, for "serious fun."

Read on to see the full set of 12 illustrations.

Breaking Down the Cost of Calatrava’s World Trade Center Oculus

08:00 - 2 May, 2016
Breaking Down the Cost of Calatrava’s World Trade Center Oculus, via The Real Deal
via The Real Deal

Twelve years after Santiago Calatrava revealed his design for the World Trade Center Oculus, the PATH station finally opened to the public in March. Although not officially confirmed by the Port Authority, the total cost of the Oculus is estimated to be nearly four billion dollars - almost double the original budget. The Real Deal has broken down the big-ticket costs that went into the making of the Oculus.

MIT Announce Ten Associated Installations at 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 2 May, 2016
MIT Announce Ten Associated Installations at 2016 Venice Biennale, The Foodmet Market houses a wide variety of uses, including; meat industries, indoor markets, rooftop farms, retail and parking. The building applies the use of the platonic panels as the first architectural step towards the realization of the district wide masterplan which envisions the conversion of an industrial slaughterhouse to a mixed urban environment. Foodmet Abbatoir, Brussels (2016). Image © Filip Dujardin
The Foodmet Market houses a wide variety of uses, including; meat industries, indoor markets, rooftop farms, retail and parking. The building applies the use of the platonic panels as the first architectural step towards the realization of the district wide masterplan which envisions the conversion of an industrial slaughterhouse to a mixed urban environment. Foodmet Abbatoir, Brussels (2016). Image © Filip Dujardin

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have announced that eight full-time or visiting faculty members and four alumni spanning five continents will be responsible for ten separate installations at the upcoming 2016 Venice Biennale. The institution have said that their "worldview for meaningful impact [is] deeply aligned with this year’s theme of architecture in action."

KAAN Architecten Designs New Building for the University of Tilburg

14:00 - 1 May, 2016
KAAN Architecten Designs New Building for the University of Tilburg, © Beauty & The Bit
© Beauty & The Bit

KAAN Architecten, in collaboration with VORM, have designed a new 11,000 square-meter Education and Study Center (OZC) for the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. The OZC will be used by approximately 2,500 students and educators on the campus. The goal is for the new facility to increase the quality of education at the university.

Elizabeth Tower and Big Ben to Undergo Renovations

12:00 - 1 May, 2016
Elizabeth Tower and Big Ben to Undergo Renovations, © Flickr CC User Alun Salt, Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
© Flickr CC User Alun Salt, Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

The Parliament of the United Kingdom has announced a series of renovations that will take place on Elizabeth Tower and Big Ben in London, starting in early 2017. During the renovation period, the tower and clock will be partially covered with scaffolding, which will be removed as the work progresses. Moreover, the clock mechanism will be stopped for several months, during which there will be no chiming or striking of the iconic bells. 

Gallery: Santiago Calatrava's WTC Transportation Hub Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

11:00 - 1 May, 2016
Gallery: Santiago Calatrava's WTC Transportation Hub Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Since it opened to the public two months ago, Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transportation Hub has been the subject of intense debate. Critics and the public alike have tried to answer whether the building, while undeniably unique and striking, was worth the $4 billion price tag that made it the world's most expensive train station. Key to this question's answer will be the way that the building settles into its role as a piece of the city's fabric.

With construction work still surrounding the building - both on the site itself and at the nearby skyscrapers - photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu turned his camera lens onto the station to see how it has been absorbed into the life of the city, capturing the way the structure is revealed from unexpected vantage points and showing how its users react to the sublime internal space of the "oculus."

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +30

World Architecture Festival to Address International Housing and Immigration Issues

08:00 - 1 May, 2016
World Architecture Festival to Address International Housing and Immigration Issues, Lars Krückeberg, Founding Partner of GRAFT (© Paulus Ponizak); Juergen Mayer, Founder of J. Mayer H. Image Courtesy of The World Architecture Festival
Lars Krückeberg, Founding Partner of GRAFT (© Paulus Ponizak); Juergen Mayer, Founder of J. Mayer H. Image Courtesy of The World Architecture Festival

The World Architecture Festival (WAF) has announced that Lars Krückeberg, Founding Partner of GRAFT, and Juergen Mayer, Founder of J. Mayer H., will speak at this year's festival as part of a session titled ‘Architect as Instigator,’ exploring issues of housing, immigration, and how architects can drive social change through the buildings and spaces they create.

The world’s largest, annual, international architectural event, WAF will be held from November 16 to 18, at Franz Ahrens’ historic former bus depot now known as Arena Berlin, in BerlinGermany. WAF also features the biggest architectural awards programme in the world. Projects can be submitted for consideration for an award until May 19th via this link

MVRDV Designs Reusable Pavilion for Bogotá Book Fair

12:00 - 30 April, 2016
MVRDV Designs Reusable Pavilion for Bogotá Book Fair, © Punto Avi
© Punto Avi

MVRDV’s design for the Dutch exhibition “Hola Holanda” at the Book Fair of Bogotá (FILBO) features a modular system of crates that will be repurposed as neighbourhood libraries after the Book Fair ends. Avoiding the waste of resources created by one-time pavilions, the Dutch firm has introduced a playful element of sustainability to the fair, maintaining its spirit even after the event ends.

Will A UK Power Station Become the Most Expensive Thing Ever Built?

16:20 - 29 April, 2016
Will A UK Power Station Become the Most Expensive Thing Ever Built?, Existing Nuclear Power Station at Hinkley Point. Image © Image Courtesy of Wikipedia User: Richard Baker licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
Existing Nuclear Power Station at Hinkley Point. Image © Image Courtesy of Wikipedia User: Richard Baker licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

"What is the most expensive object on Earth?" posits an article by Ed Davey published by the BBC. A new nuclear power station being built in the south west of the United Kingdom may well end up holding the title. At £24 billion ($35 billion) Davey estimates, "you could build a small forest of Burj Khalifas - the world's tallest building, in Dubai, cost a piffling £1bn ($1.5bn)." The article later compares the construction to other projects like bridges and particle accelerators, as well as historic precedents like the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Great Wall of China, Hong Kong International Airport, or the International Space Station – the last of which cost a whopping $110 billion. But comparing monumental building and engineering projects comes with some caveats, such as: “what is strictly an individual object?” “Is cost measured by today’s values or those at the time of construction?” “Are we talking about modern methods or those used historically?” Read the full article here.

MARC FORNES/THEVERYMANY Design "Spineway" in San Antonio

14:00 - 29 April, 2016
MARC FORNES/THEVERYMANY Design "Spineway" in San Antonio, Courtesy of Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY
Courtesy of Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY

MARC FORNES/THEVERYMANY has unveiled “Spineway”, a permanent public artwork commissioned by the City of San Antonio in Woodlawn Lake Park. Calling to mind the midcentury marvels of Alexander Calder or Mark di Suvero, Spineway has been digitally fabricated with custom computational protocols of structural form-finding and descriptive geometry. As with past projects by MARC FORNES/THEVERYMANY the studio posits, “Spineway is consistent with the studio's approach of exploring structural performance while catalyzing public places through dynamic and unique spatial experiences.”

Courtesy of Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Courtesy of Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY © Texas By Air Courtesy of Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY +25

Jean Nouvel Unveils Design for Hotel and Residential Tower in São Paulo

08:00 - 29 April, 2016
Jean Nouvel Unveils Design for Hotel and Residential Tower in São Paulo, View of the southwest façade. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard
View of the southwest façade. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard

Jean Nouvel has unveiled the design of his latest project: a 22-story tower located near Avenida Paulista in São Paulo. The skyscraper, dubbed Rosewood Tower, is part of Cidade Matarazzo, a 27,000-square-meter site containing historic buildings that once made up the Filomena Matarazzo maternity hospital. A heritage-listed site, the Allard Group is restoring the buildings and creating a cultural center, of which Nouvel’s new tower will be a central component.

Set to contain a hotel as well as residential units, Nouvel’s tower is designed to be a vertical continuation of the local landscape. Thus, the nearly 100-meter-tall tower develops at different levels, forming terraces and large gardens with small and medium-sized trees.

MVRDV and COBE's Museum of Rock Opens in the Danish City of Roskilde

04:00 - 29 April, 2016
MVRDV and COBE's Museum of Rock Opens in the Danish City of Roskilde, © Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST Studio - COBE and MVRDV
© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST Studio - COBE and MVRDV

A new museum dedicated to rock, pop and youth culture will open today in the Danish city of Roskilde. Designed collaboratively by Dutch-based practice MVRDV and Copenhagen-based COBE Ragnarock, as it is to be known, has been described by its designers as "oozing rock’n’roll attitude, with its golden exterior and velvety red interior." The museum is part of ROCKmagneten, a masterplan for the site of a former concrete factory which COBE and MVRDV won together in 2011. The area has since been designated as a creative and cultural neighborhood and the museum, which is now at the heart of this transformation, is set to be open to the public all year round.

SHoP Unveils Design for New Skyscraper in Manhattan's Lower East Side

16:00 - 28 April, 2016
SHoP Unveils Design for New Skyscraper in Manhattan's Lower East Side, Courtesy of SHoP
Courtesy of SHoP

SHoP has unveiled the design for a new 900 foot tall skyscraper in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The 77 story, 500,000 square foot, mixed-income tower will have 600 units, 150 of which will be permanently affordable and distributed evenly throughout the building. The project has been developed as a collaboration between SHoP and JDS who are co-owners of the development, with the partnership of two not-for-profit groups: Two Bridges Neighborhood Council (TBNC) and Settlement Housing Fund (SHF).

Iwan Baan's Photographs of the Harbin Opera House in Winter

14:00 - 28 April, 2016
Iwan Baan's Photographs of the Harbin Opera House in Winter , © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Iwan Baan has unveiled a new series of images depicting a snow-covered Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects and its surrounding landscapes. The northern Chinese city of Harbin is known for its brutal winters where temperatures can reach -22°F (-30°C). In the photographs, the Opera House's sinuous white aluminum cladding echoes the ice formed in the adjacent river. “Harbin is very cold for the most of the year,” says MAD principal and founder Ma Yansong. “I envisioned a building that would blend into the winter landscape as a white snow dune arising from the wetlands.”

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +25

Kengo Kuma and Cornelius+Vöge Release Plans for Hans Christian Andersen Museum in Odense

12:00 - 28 April, 2016
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Cornelius+Vöge, and MASU planning
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Cornelius+Vöge, and MASU planning

Kengo Kuma & Associates, in a team with Cornelius+Vöge and landscape architects MASU planning, have revealed plans for the Hans Christian Andersen Museum in Odense, Denmark. Channeling the otherworldliness of Andersen’s fairy tales, the 5,600 square meter building is two-thirds below grade, leaving ground level space for “enchanted” gardens of large trees, lawns, box hedges, and tall shrubs. The museum building is an ambling collection of cylindrical volumes, with glass and lattice timber facades beneath scooped green roofs, all surrounding a sunken courtyard space. The project will replace an existing museum that is largely focused on the author’s personal life with one that is more centered on his stories.

Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Cornelius+Vöge, and MASU planning Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Cornelius+Vöge, and MASU planning Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Cornelius+Vöge, and MASU planning Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Cornelius+Vöge, and MASU planning +14

Gottfried Böhm: the Son, Grandson, Husband and Father of Architects

04:00 - 28 April, 2016

Concrete Love is a film about the Böhm family. Shot at their residence in Cologne, Germany, and on location at their projects—both completed and under construction—around the world, the film's Swiss director, Maurizius Staerkle-Drux, spent two years in close quarters recording scenes and conversations that offer a profound insight into the world of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Gottfried Böhm, the late Elisabeth Böhm, and their three sons.

Read on to be in with a chance of winning a copy of the film.

Neviges Church (exterior). Image © Lichtblickfilm Köln / 2:1 Film Zürich Bensberg Childs Village. Image © Lichtblickfilm Köln / 2:1 Film Zürich Köln Melaten. Image © Lichtblickfilm Köln / 2:1 Film Zürich Köln Mosque (Paul Böhm). Image © Lichtblickfilm Köln / 2:1 Film Zürich +22

Kengo Kuma Unveils Mixed-Use Skyscraper in Vancouver

16:00 - 27 April, 2016
Kengo Kuma Unveils Mixed-Use Skyscraper in Vancouver, Courtesy of v2com
Courtesy of v2com

Kengo Kuma and Associates has revealed plans for the office’s first North American skyscraper, a mixed-use luxury tower on a site adjacent to Stanley Park in Vancouver. Known as ‘Alberni by Kuma,’ the 43-story tower combines 181 residences with retail space and a restaurant in a rectilinear volume accented by "scoops" on two sides. These curvatures are the building’s most important formal attribute, while a moss garden at the tower's base is its most important spatial feature. The project is being organized by Westbank and Peterson, and is part of a group of architecturally significant projects being developed by the pair in the west coast city.

Courtesy of v2com Courtesy of v2com Courtesy of v2com Courtesy of v2com +10

Lisson Gallery New York by studioMDA and Studio Christian Wassmann Opening Soon Beneath the High Line

14:00 - 27 April, 2016
Lisson Gallery New York by studioMDA and Studio Christian Wassmann Opening Soon Beneath the High Line, Courtesy of Lisson Gallery
Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

On May 3, Lisson Gallery New York will open beneath the High Line between 23rd and 24th Street. Designed by studioMDA and Studio Christian Wassmann, the 8,500 square foot space is split between a gallery, offices, viewing rooms, and storage. Although the main gallery is directly under the High Line – the steel columns in the photos are actually supports for the elevated railway – it will receive ample sun from dramatically angled skylights along the space’s edge, which also aid to extend the walls vertically. The gallery's polished concrete floors, white walls, and natural light are typical of today's contemporary art spaces, but also maintain the aesthetic of Lisson's other galleries. The public will access the space via 24th Street, while the 23rd Street entrance will be reserved for staff purposes and private functions.

Lisson Gallery New York. Image Courtesy of studioMDA Lisson Gallery New York. Image Courtesy of studioMDA Courtesy of studioMDA Courtesy of Lisson Gallery +14

André Chiote Reimagines Libraries From Around the World as Minimalist Illustrations

12:00 - 27 April, 2016
André Chiote Reimagines Libraries From Around the World as Minimalist Illustrations, © André Chiote
© André Chiote

André Chiote’s newest series of illustrations focuses on the unique architectural characteristics of modern and contemporary world libraries. Using the building facades as a starting point, Chiote turns the complex exterior geometries and shadows into more minimalist representations of facilities that include: OMA’s Seattle Public Library, Scmidt Hammer Lassen’s University of Aberdeen New Library, and Dominique Perrault’s National Library of France.

“Libraries,” says Chiote, “Are houses of books. And newspapers. And magazines. And music. And movies. The entire world connected, where we are with ourselves and with others. They are our memories and our legacy. The reference of knowledge and leisure but also urbanity. Libraries are the house where we must always return.”

© André Chiote © André Chiote © André Chiote © André Chiote +15

AIA Names Top 10 Most Sustainable Projects of 2016

08:00 - 27 April, 2016
AIA Names Top 10 Most Sustainable Projects of 2016, The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick
The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and its Committee on the Environment (COTE) have selected the top ten sustainable architecture and ecological design projects for 2016.

Now in its 20th year, the COTE Top Ten Awards program honors projects that protect and enhance the environment through an integrated approach to architecture, natural systems, and technology.

A recently released study, entitled Lessons from the Leading Edge, reports that design projects recognized through this program are “outpacing the industry by virtually every standard of performance.”

The 2016 COTE Top Ten Green Projects are:

Cubo + jaja Win Competition to Restore the Nyborg Castle in Denmark

06:00 - 27 April, 2016
Cubo + jaja Win Competition to Restore the Nyborg Castle in Denmark, Courtesy of Team Cubo
Courtesy of Team Cubo

Cubo and jaja, together with VBM, Schul Landscape, Søren Jensen Engineers, and Professor Mogens Morgen of The Aarhus School of Architecture, have been selected to renew the medieval Nyborg Castle. The 15th century castle is located on the Danish island of Funen and is where Denmark’s first constitution was signed in 1282.

Monocle 24 Investigate What it Takes to Cover Architecture and Design

04:00 - 27 April, 2016

This edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft turns its editorial gaze back to their "own turf" to consider ways in which publications cover design and architecture, both in print and online. The episode asks whether "traditional magazines are as influential as they used to be," and whether or not "clicks and online-only articles can actually pay the bills?" In search of answers, Monocle's Henry-Rees Sheridan talks to ArchDaily's co-founder and Editor-in-Chief, David Basulto, along with European Editor-at-Large James Taylor-Foster, about the origins of the platform – and more.