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Rafael Moneo and Eva Franch i Gilabert Among Seven Jurors Announced for the 2016 Wheelwright Prize

15:30 - 21 January, 2016
Rafael Moneo and Eva Franch i Gilabert Among Seven Jurors Announced for the 2016 Wheelwright Prize, The Graduate School of Design. Image Courtesy of Harvard GSD
The Graduate School of Design. Image Courtesy of Harvard GSD

The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) have announced Mohsen Mostafavi, Eva Franch i Gilabert, K. Michael Hays, Jeannie Kim, Benjamin Prosky, Rafael Moneo, and Kiel Moe as the jurors of the 2016 Wheelwright Prize. The award, "an open, international competition for early-career architects that supports travel-based research with a $100,000 grant," was relaunched as an international competition in 2012 and is now open to all graduates of professionally accredited programs within the last fifteen years. Last year's winner was Erik l'Heureaux for his proposal to study the extreme climatic conditions of equatorial zones.

Bartlett Students Develop New Method for 3D Printing Concrete

12:00 - 21 January, 2016
Bartlett Students Develop New Method for 3D Printing Concrete, 3D printed concrete table. Image © Amalgamma
3D printed concrete table. Image © Amalgamma

Four Masters students from Bartlett School of Architecture - Francesca Camilleri, Nadia Doukhi, Alvaro Lopez Rodriguez and Roman Strukov - have developed a new method for 3D printing large-scale, self-supporting concrete structures. With their project Fossilised, the team, known as Amalgamma, combined two existing concrete 3D printing methods - the extrusion printing method and the powder printing method - to create a form of supported extrusion that allows for "more volumetric" concrete structures. 

"The supported extrusion method has therefore presented the opportunity to design forms that are more varied and more volumetric, as opposed to the very straight vertical forms so far achieved in 3D concrete practice," says Amalgamma. 

Allan Teramura Named 77th President of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada

08:00 - 21 January, 2016
Allan Teramura Named 77th President of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, The Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health where Allan Teramura gave his investiture speech. Image via Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health
The Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health where Allan Teramura gave his investiture speech. Image via Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health

On January 15, 2015, Allan Teramura, FRAIC, was named the 77th President of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC). The Ottawa architect is a principal at Watson MacEwen Teramura Architects, and has advocated for healthier, sustainable Aboriginal communities in Canada.

Exhibition at Chicago's Graham Foundation to Examine African Modernism

07:00 - 21 January, 2016
Exhibition at Chicago's Graham Foundation to Examine African Modernism,  Rinaldo Olivieri, La Pyramide, 1973, Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire). Image © Iwan Baan
Rinaldo Olivieri, La Pyramide, 1973, Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire). Image © Iwan Baan

new exhibition opening later this month at Chicago's Graham Foundation seeks to explore the complex history and legacy of modernist architecture in sub-Saharan Africa during the 1960s and 1970s. Architecture of Independence: African Modernism will feature nearly eighty buildings in commissioned photographs by Iwan Baan, Alexia Webster, and Manuel Herz. Alongside archival material, the exhibition "imparts a new perspective on the intersection of architecture and nation-building in Ghana, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, Kenya, and Zambia and investigates some of the most compelling yet under-studied examples of 1960s and 1970s architecture worldwide."

US ABI Ends 2015 on Positive Note

16:00 - 20 January, 2016
US ABI Ends 2015 on Positive Note, December 2015 ABI. Image © CalculatedRiskBlog.com
December 2015 ABI. Image © CalculatedRiskBlog.com

Despite a few volatile months, the US Architecture Billings Index (ABI) concluded 2015in positive terrain. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the December ABI score was 50.9, up from the mark of 49.3 in the previous month. This score reflects a slight increase in design services (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). The new projects inquiry index was 60.2, up from a reading of 58.6 the previous month.

“As has been the case for the past several years, there continues to be a mix of business conditions that architecture firms are experiencing,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD.  “Overall, however, ABIscores for 2015 averaged just below the strong showing in 2014, which points to another healthy year for construction this year.”

2016 Pritzker Prize Winner Alejandro Aravena's Work in 15 Images

14:00 - 20 January, 2016
2016 Pritzker Prize Winner Alejandro Aravena's Work in 15 Images, © Cristobal Palma / Estudio Palma
© Cristobal Palma / Estudio Palma

Alejandro Aravena is the first Chilean architect to ever receive a Pritzker Prize. Praised for reviving the socially engaged architect, the 48-year-old architect and executive director of ELEMENTAL has proved architecture's ability to solve pressing global issues through his diverse portfolio. Read on to see 15 projects that exemplify Aravena's contribution to architecture so far. 

Welcome to ArchDaily's New Website Design!

13:45 - 20 January, 2016

Since the foundation of ArchDaily in 2008, our goal has been to build a large database of projects, news stories and articles in order to give our readers the inspiration, knowledge and tools they need to do their best work. But just because our database is becoming increasingly complex, that doesn't mean that your interaction with it has to be overwhelming.

Seven months ago we introduced our new, custom-built publishing platform - a largely behind-the-scenes change which allowed us to bring you new organizational tools such as our faceted search for projects, events and competitions as well as an improved version of My ArchDaily to let you create your own architectural library. Since then, our development team has been working hard on a new front-end design that is worthy of the changes we have already made under the surface.

With the new design, we have sought to simplify the ArchDaily site, re-emphasizing our "less is more" motto from the last design by organizing the layout into just two main columns: one for our stream of articles and one which helps you navigate the site by suggesting related content and popular articles. In addition, our developers have updated the website technology to improve loading speeds and bring you a seamless experience on our site. Read on to find out more details about the updated site!

Inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial Closes with Over Half a Million Visitors

08:00 - 20 January, 2016
Inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial Closes with Over Half a Million Visitors, Installation view of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Photo by Steve Hall, © Hedrich Blessing. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial
Installation view of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Photo by Steve Hall, © Hedrich Blessing. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial

The first ever Chicago Architecture Biennial closed January 3, with over half a million visitors having attended the event. An architecture exhibition of unprecedented size on the continent, the Biennial gathered 93 projects from 120 offices from over 30 countries to discuss the “State of the Art of Architecture.” We take a look at some of the Biennial's highlights after the break.

'In Therapy' – the Nordic Contribution to the 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 20 January, 2016

The Nordic nations—Finland, Norway and Sweden—have reached a pivotal point in their collective, and individual, architectural identities. The Grandfathers of the universal Nordic style—including the likes of Sverre Fehn, Peter Celsing, Gunnar Asplund, Sigurd Lewerentz, Alvar Aalto, and Eero Saarinen—provided a foundation upon which architects and designers since have both thrived on and been confined by. The Nordic Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale—directed by Alejandro Aravena—will be the moment to probe: to discuss, argue, debate and challenge what Nordic architecture really is and, perhaps more importantly, what it could be in years to come.

We're asking for every practice (and individual) across the world who have built work in Finland, Norway and Sweden in the past eight years to submit their project(s) and be part of the largest survey of contemporary Nordic architecture ever compiled.

Update: the Open Call for In Therapy closed on the 24th January 2016.

Maristella Casciato Named Getty Research Institute's New Architecture Curator

16:00 - 19 January, 2016
Maristella Casciato Named Getty Research Institute's New Architecture Curator, Getty Center / Richard Meier & Partners, Architects LLP. Image © Scott Frances ESTO
Getty Center / Richard Meier & Partners, Architects LLP. Image © Scott Frances ESTO

Maristella Casciato, former associate director of research at the Canadian Centre for Architecture, has been named the Getty Research Institute's new Senior Curator of Architectural Collections. Casciato is an expert on 20th century European architecture - the Institute's most sought after content - making her an ideal choice to manage GRI's expanding archives. 

“Maristella Casciato is an exceptionally accomplished scholar and curator who is passionately committed to the study of architectural history and the preservation of architecture. She is the ideal steward for our tremendously significant architecture holdings,” said Thomas W. Gaehtgens, director of the Getty Research Institute. 

BIG's 2 World Trade Center Stalls After Fox Withdraws

14:00 - 19 January, 2016
BIG's 2 World Trade Center Stalls After Fox Withdraws, © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG
© DBOX, Courtesy of BIG

Two major tenants, 21st Century Fox and News Corp have pulled plans to relocate to the BIG-designed 2 World Trade Center - the final building planned for the 16 acre site. 2 WTC was unveiled last summer after news broke that BIG would be replacing Foster + Partners as the building's architect. According to a report on The Wall Street Journal, the two media companies based their decision on the high cost of relocating; they plan to stay in their current Midtown site until at least 2025.

The project will be placed on hold until a new tenant is found. 

Kengo Kuma Denies Copying Zaha Hadid's Tokyo National Stadium Design

12:00 - 19 January, 2016
Kengo Kuma Denies Copying Zaha Hadid's Tokyo National Stadium Design, Kengo Kuma's design. Image © Japan Sport Council
Kengo Kuma's design. Image © Japan Sport Council

In the latest Tokyo National Stadium news, Kengo Kuma is firing back to Zaha Hadid's allegations regarding the "similarities" of the two designs by insisting that his "concept is completely different." As reported the Architects' Journal, the Japanese architect agrees there are some natural similarities due to appropriate sightlines and regulations, however the actual design and concept are radically different.

"I believe that the design by Zaha Hadid was excellent, with a unique shape and demonstration of her philosophy," said Kuma in a press conference. "When we consider the design is being created within the same land, using the same tracks and under the same laws it is natural and almost automatic that there are some similarities which will arise."

"And despite the technical details being similar, the concepts and designs are completely different," he added, referring to Hadid's "saddle-style" design and his flat-roofed proposal. 

OMA to Renovate Berlin’s Historic KaDeWe Department Store

08:28 - 19 January, 2016
OMA to Renovate Berlin’s Historic KaDeWe Department Store, Courtesy of OMA
Courtesy of OMA

OMA has been selected to renovate Kaufhaus des Westens (KaDeWe), a historic department store in Berlin – and the biggest in continental Europe. Its giant size “makes it akin to a city: a three dimensional network of paths, squares, neighbourhoods, activitiies and views unfolding through its large extensions and providing opportunities for commercial, social and cultural encounters,” writes OMA.

To address the size, their design divides the department store into four quadrants, breaking “the original mass into smaller, easily accessible and navigable components.” Each quadrant will target different audiences and act as an independent department store. Learn more about the design after the break.

Courtesy of OMA Courtesy of OMA Courtesy of OMA Courtesy of OMA +16

Studio Libeskind, Mecanoo and Haptic Appointed to Van Alen Institute's International Council

04:00 - 19 January, 2016
Studio Libeskind, Mecanoo and Haptic Appointed to Van Alen Institute's International Council, Van Alen Institute. Image © Cameron Blaylock
Van Alen Institute. Image © Cameron Blaylock

New York City's Van Alen Institute have announced four new members—Haptic Architects, Mecanoo, Studio Libeskind, and Trahan Architects—to their International Council, a platform for exchange among leading architects, designers, developers, and planners. Furthermore, Jing Liu (SO–IL), Kim Herforth Nielsen (3XN), and Raymond Quinn (Arup) have joined its board of trustees to help guide the organisation's cross-disciplinary research, provocative public programs, and design competitions.

50 Architects Tell Us What They Are Looking Forward to in 2016

12:00 - 18 January, 2016
50 Architects Tell Us What They Are Looking Forward to in 2016

As the first month of 2016 draws to a close, we decided to tap into our network and ask an esteemed group of architects, critics, theorists and educators to tell us what they are looking forward to this year in architecture. 

What are you looking forward to in architecture this year?

The World Now Has 100 Supertall Buildings

08:00 - 18 January, 2016
The World Now Has 100 Supertall Buildings, 432 Park Avenue, New York City. Image © DBOX for CIM Group & Macklowe Properties
432 Park Avenue, New York City. Image © DBOX for CIM Group & Macklowe Properties

Following the recent completion of 432 Park Avenue in New York City, The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has announced that there are now 100 supertall (300-plus-meter) skyscrapers in the world. The majority of these skyscrapers are in Asia and the Middle East, mirroring construction trends that have emerged over the past decade. Dubai leads the rankings with 18 supertall buildings, while New York City now falls in second place with a total of seven, including 432 Park Avenue.

Victor Enrich Transforms Architectural Images Into Optical Illusions

07:00 - 18 January, 2016
Victor Enrich Transforms Architectural Images Into Optical Illusions, © Victor Enrich
© Victor Enrich

Since 2006, artist Victor Enrich has been working on his project, City Portraits, a series of digitally manipulated images that transform photos into architectural illusions.

© Victor Enrich © Victor Enrich © Victor Enrich © Victor Enrich +34

Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist' Speaks to Those Who Are "Fighting the Establishment"

08:00 - 17 January, 2016

In the latest episode of The UrbanistMonocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities," the team tackle the 'establishment'. From small businesses to citizen collectives, the show discovers how "championing transformative change from the ground up can be the best way to alter the status quo in our cities." Investigating how the Ministry of Space is reclaiming public spaces in Belgrade, how ordinary citizens in Vienna are welcoming refugees, and how a collective in Rio de Janeiro wants to reshape the politics of the city, the episode also explores how small businesses in London’s West End are fighting against increasing rent.

158 Finalists Named in Knight Cities Challenge

14:00 - 16 January, 2016
158 Finalists Named in Knight Cities Challenge, 2015 Winning Entry by Jacques Gaffigan. Image Courtesy of The Knight Foundation
2015 Winning Entry by Jacques Gaffigan. Image Courtesy of The Knight Foundation

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation has announced the names of the 158 finalists in the Knight Cities Challenge. The nationwide call was for innovative ideas to make the 26 communities where the Knight Foundation invests more social and vibrant places to live. More than 4,500 entries were submitted proposing a range of ideas from opening the world’s largest African American history museum in Detroit to a card game that encourages residents of Charlotte to visit new neighborhoods. The winners, who will split a prize of $5 million, will be announced in the spring of 2016.

Vardehaugen’s 1:1 Project Plans Let You Walk Through Their Drawings

12:00 - 16 January, 2016
Vardehaugen’s 1:1 Project Plans Let You Walk Through Their Drawings, Sketch of “Mountain Hill Cabin” project. Image © Vardehaugen
Sketch of “Mountain Hill Cabin” project. Image © Vardehaugen

Norway based architecture studio Vardehaugen has created a series of life-sized project drawings in its own backyard. Inspired by the idea that the "bodily sensation of scale, or the notion of simply walking through a room, cannot be experienced through traditional 3D visualizations or scaled models," the 1:1 models allow for better understandings of dimensions and spatial sequences, even before the projects are built.

Fantastic Architecture: Illustrations By Bruna Canepa

08:00 - 16 January, 2016
© Bruna Canepa
© Bruna Canepa

Architect, illustrator and cofounder of the Miniatura project, Bruna Canepa has shared with us a stunning collection of her illustrations and collages, which offer a fresh gaze onto one of architecture’s most common tools: the drawing. Beyond depicting examples of unreal architecture, her works present architecture that replaces firmitas, utilitas and venustas for complexity, wonder and irony.

From extrusions and explosions of familiar typologies to surreal and sterile atmospheres of empty spaces, we suggest three subcategories to frame Bruna’s illustrations as shown below: Houses, Cubics, and Displacements. 

EHDD's Monterey Bay Aquarium Wins AIA 25 Year Award

16:00 - 15 January, 2016
EHDD's Monterey Bay Aquarium Wins AIA 25 Year Award, Monterey Bay Aquarium / EHDD. Image Courtesy of Bruce Damonte
Monterey Bay Aquarium / EHDD. Image Courtesy of Bruce Damonte

The Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, California, has been selected for the 2016 American Institute of Architects' (AIA) Twenty-five Year Award. Designed by EHDD of San Francisco, and completed in 1984, the Monterey Bay Aquarium is a "light-filled ensemble of diverse spaces, unique among aquariums in its interweaving of indoors and out," says the AIA. The award is presented yearly to a project that has "stood the test of time by embodying architectural excellence for 25 to 35 years." 

AIA Names 18 Projects as Best New Architecture in US

15:00 - 15 January, 2016
Henderson-Hopkins School / Rogers Partners. Image © Albert Vecerka ESTO
Henderson-Hopkins School / Rogers Partners. Image © Albert Vecerka ESTO

A boathouse by Studio Gang, the Smithsonian's BIG plan, and a new Baltimore school by Rogers Partners' are some of 18 projects selected for the 2016 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Honor Awards. The awarded projects were chosen from 500 submissions as the US' best new architecture, interiors and urban design projects. Each recipient will be honored at the AIA 2016 National Convention in Philadelphia.

The 2016 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture are...

Smithsonian Institution South Campus Master Plan / BIG. Image © Doug & Wolf Case Inlet Retreat / MW Works. Image via AIA Perot Museum of Nature and Science / Morphosis Architects; Associate Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell. Image via AIA WMS Boathouse at Clark Park / Studio Gang Architects. Image © Hedrich Blessing +19

Janet Echelman Suspends Net Sculpture Over London's Oxford Circus

12:00 - 15 January, 2016
Janet Echelman Suspends Net Sculpture Over London's Oxford Circus, 1.8 London, Janet Echelman, Lumiere London 2016, produced by Artichoke, supported by the Mayor of London. Image © Ema Peter
1.8 London, Janet Echelman, Lumiere London 2016, produced by Artichoke, supported by the Mayor of London. Image © Ema Peter

London is the latest city to host one of Janet Echelman's stunning net sculptures. Suspended 180 feet above Oxford Circus, the city's busiest intersections, the colorful floating form was inspired by 1.8 - "the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened" as a result of Japan's devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami. 

"The sculpture’s form was inspired by data sets of the tsunami’s wave heights rippling across the entire Pacific Ocean," says the studio. "The artwork delves into content related to our complex interdependencies with larger cycles of time and our physical world. The sculpture’s net structure is a physical manifestation of interconnectedness – when any one element moves, every other element is affected."