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Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Completes Their Latest "Structural Shingle" Project in France

16:00 - 3 November, 2015
Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Completes Their Latest "Structural Shingle" Project in France , © MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY
© MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY

MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY have completed "Pleated Inflation" a new permanent installation located in Argeles-Sur-Mer, France. Following in the footsteps of projects such as their "Vaulted Willow," the design is the latest in what they term their "structural shingle" group of projects, made up of pleated aluminum sheets which - thanks to the firm's computational design technique - simultaneously serve as the project's structure, enclosure, and its primary architectural component.

Commissioned as part of the French 1% Artistique program by the Region Languedoc Roussillon, the project serves as an informal amphitheater for the students at Lycée Christian Bourquin, "bringing together structural performance and spatial experience" with its "ornate shadows cast from porous structural pleats." Read on for more images and the full description from the architects.

© MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY © MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY © MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY © MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY +20

World Monuments Fund Releases List of 50 Endangered Cultural Sites

08:00 - 3 November, 2015
World Monuments Fund Releases List of 50 Endangered Cultural Sites , Shabolovka Radio Tower, Moscow, Russia. Vladimir Shukhov, 1922. Image © IOM 2015
Shabolovka Radio Tower, Moscow, Russia. Vladimir Shukhov, 1922. Image © IOM 2015

The World Monuments Fund has released its 2016 World Monuments Watch list of 50 cultural heritage sites at risk in 36 countries around the world. The list, in its twentieth year, seeks to identify sites “at risk from the forces of nature and the impacts of social, political, and economic change,” and direct financial and technical support towards them. 

The 2016 list includes the entirety of post-earthquake Nepal, an underwater city, the only surviving quadrifrons arch in Rome, and a structurally significant hyperboloid tower, among others. The Fund even featured an “Unnamed Monument” on the list, in honor of all sites at risk of damage from social and political instability around the globe.

Learn more about some of the featured monuments, after the break.

Norman Foster on Urbanism, Emerging Economies and Airport Design

04:00 - 3 November, 2015

In an exclusive half-hour interview with Lord Norman FosterMonocle's editor-in-chief Tyler Brûlé discusses matters of urban planning and "big-thinking emerging economies" with "one of the world’s most innovative and revered architects." Foster, who turned eighty years of age this year, has been the recipient of some of the world's most prestigious architecture awards – from the Pritzker Prize, the Stirling Prize, the AIA Gold Medal and the Prince of Asturias Award (Spain). Over the years, Foster's practice have become world-renowned experts in high-density transit design (namely, airports) – a focus of Brûlé's questioning.

London's Garden Bridge Saved by Funding Cut

16:00 - 2 November, 2015
London's Garden Bridge Saved by Funding Cut, Courtesy of Arup
Courtesy of Arup

Thomas Heatherwick's controversial Garden Bridge in London has regained popular support amongst officials after a significant cut in funding. The Transport for London (TfL) – the authority in charge of the Garden Bridge program, which was approved last year – has reduce the amount of taxpayer money from £30 to £10 million, alleviating concerns over public cost. Now, all that's needed for the project to start construction is an approved amendment to the site's lease in Lambeth. It is expected to break ground next year, despite lingering concerns over maintenance costs and use restrictions. 

6 Compete to Design World's Largest Waste-to-Energy Plant in Shenzhen

14:00 - 2 November, 2015
6 Compete to Design World's Largest Waste-to-Energy Plant in Shenzhen, Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen
Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen

Six teams have been shortlisted to design the world's largest waste-to-energy plant in Shenzhen, China: Arup, Atkins, AECOM, Gerber Architekten, Schmidt Hammer Lassen with Gottlieb Paludan Architects, and local firm Tanghua Architects. Aiming to manage Shenzhen's growing population (and waste accumulation), the "Shenzhen East Waste-to-Energy Plant" plans to incinerate 5000 tonnes of waste daily and generate an estimated 550 million kWh per year. 

RSHP Wins Competition to Expand Taiwan's Largest Airport

12:00 - 2 November, 2015
RSHP Wins Competition to Expand Taiwan's Largest Airport , © Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport
© Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) has won an international competition to expand the Taoyuan International Airport - Taiwan's largest airport, formally known as Chiang Kai-shek International Airport. Their winning scheme for the airport's new Terminal 3 building won the jury over for its "outstanding and innovative planning and design and highly efficient circulation," according the airport's official press release

"The most compelling feature of their design is an interior experience that fluctuates and moves up and down to reflect changes in the users," said the report. 

Iwan Baan in Conversation with Jonathan Glancey

04:00 - 2 November, 2015
Iwan Baan in Conversation with Jonathan Glancey, 'The State of the Art of Architecture' (part of a photo essay for the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Image © Iwan Baan
'The State of the Art of Architecture' (part of a photo essay for the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Image © Iwan Baan

Iwan Baan was twelve years old when he received his first camera and, "within a week, [he] had traded it in for a better one." He is one of the most well-known and highly sought after architectural photographers in the world, recognised for shooting cities from above and for always highlighting people (occupation) in his images. In a short interview with Jonathan Glancey Baan is the first to state that he "doesn't know much about architecture" — something which has not inhibited his ability to produce some of the most successful photographs of the built world, and how we design, construct and occupy it.

2015 New Zealand Architecture Awards Announced

16:00 - 1 November, 2015
2015 New Zealand Architecture Awards Announced, Christchurch Botanic Gardens Visitors Centre / Patterson Associates. Image © Emma Smales
Christchurch Botanic Gardens Visitors Centre / Patterson Associates. Image © Emma Smales

The New Zealand Institute of Architects has announced the 28 winners of the New Zealand Architecture Awards during an event at the Auckland Museum.

A wide range of projects were awarded, with three new categories of awards this year: the John Scott Award for public architecture, the Sir Ian Athfield Award for housing, and the Sir Miles Warren Award for commercial architecture.

Find out which 28 projects won New Zealand’s most prestigious architecture awards, after the break.

ThyssenKrupp and Microsoft's MAX Elevator Will Save Users Years of Waiting

14:00 - 1 November, 2015
ThyssenKrupp and Microsoft's MAX Elevator Will Save Users Years of Waiting, © ThyssenKrupp
© ThyssenKrupp

German mechanical company ThyssenKrupp, in collaboration with Microsoft, has launched its newest innovational elevator, MAX. Together, the companies have created an elevator that could create time savings for elevator passengers “equivalent to 108 centuries of new availability in each year of operation." 

Semi-Permanent Wood Nest Balances Unaided in Czech Republic Treetop

12:00 - 31 October, 2015
Semi-Permanent Wood Nest Balances Unaided in Czech Republic Treetop, © Antonín Matějovský, Jan Tyrpekl, Karolína Ryšavá
© Antonín Matějovský, Jan Tyrpekl, Karolína Ryšavá

Over the course of two days, architect Jan Tyrpekl created The Nest, an experimental structure built without any investors, sponsors, assignment, or project documentation in Strančice, in the Czech Republic. Made of about $120 USD worth of Osier Willow wood, The Nest perches in a park in the designer’s hometown, interlaced between tree branches, so as not to damage or affect the tree.

© Antonín Matějovský, Jan Tyrpekl, Karolína Ryšavá © Antonín Matějovský, Jan Tyrpekl, Karolína Ryšavá © Antonín Matějovský, Jan Tyrpekl, Karolína Ryšavá © Antonín Matějovský, Jan Tyrpekl, Karolína Ryšavá +12

UK and Wolfgang Buttress Win "Best Pavilion" at Milan Expo 2015

15:36 - 30 October, 2015
UK and Wolfgang Buttress Win "Best Pavilion" at Milan Expo 2015, UK Pavilion - Milan Expo 2015 / Wolfgang Buttress. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
UK Pavilion - Milan Expo 2015 / Wolfgang Buttress. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

As the Milan Expo 2015 comes to a close, the winners of its best pavilions are being revealed. Wolfgang Buttress' UK Pavilion has taken top honors being named the exhibition's "Best Pavilion for Architecture & Landscape." A crowd favorite, the pavilion caught the attention of the world with it's mesmerizing (and photogenic) "beehive" made of 169,300 individual aluminium components that allowed visitors to experience the life of a bee. 

SOFTlab Wins Second Annual Flatiron Competition in New York

14:06 - 30 October, 2015
SOFTlab Wins Second Annual Flatiron Competition in New York, © SOFTlab
© SOFTlab

SOFTlab has been chosen as the second annual winner of the Flatiron Public Plaza design competition in New York. Their winning proposal, Nova will open to the public next month on Wednesday, November 18th. Its "crystalline" structure aims to intrigue the passer-by, welcoming them inside for framed views of the Flatiron Building and surrounding landmarks, including the Met Life Tower and Empire State Building

Serpentine Director Julia Peyton-Jones Steps Down After 25 Years

12:00 - 30 October, 2015
Serpentine Director Julia Peyton-Jones Steps Down After 25 Years, 2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / SelgasCano. Image © Iwan Baan
2015 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / SelgasCano. Image © Iwan Baan

Julia Peyton-Jones has announced her plan to step down as the Serpentine Gallery director in the summer of 2016. During her 25-year lead, Peyton-Jones oversaw the start of the Serpentine Gallery Pavillon commissions and opening of Zaha Hadid Architects' Serpentine Sackler Gallery.

"There is never a good time to leave an institution but I wanted to leave the Serpentine at a time of strength and success," said Peyton-Jones, as reported by the Architects' Journal

Design Trust and Farming Concrete Release World’s First Public Urban Agriculture Database

08:00 - 30 October, 2015
Design Trust and Farming Concrete Release World’s First Public Urban Agriculture Database, Hells Kitchen Farm Project, Hell's Kitchen, Manhatttan. Image © Rob Stephenson for the Design Trust for Public Space
Hells Kitchen Farm Project, Hell's Kitchen, Manhatttan. Image © Rob Stephenson for the Design Trust for Public Space

The Design Trust for Public Space and Farming Concrete have released the Farming Concrete Data Collection Toolkit: the first public platform for gathering, tracking and understanding urban agriculture production and the benefits of community gardens, urban farms and school gardens. The result of a six-year initiative, Five Borough Farm, the Toolkit features a user-friendly manual with simple methods of generating and collecting data at each garden and farm, with accompanying instructional videos; Barn, an online portal for farmers and gardeners to input and track their production; and Mill, a public database providing access to numbers, reports for practitioners, researchers, policymakers, funders and anyone with interest in urban agriculture.

IAAC Researcher’s Pylos 3D-Prints with Soil

06:00 - 30 October, 2015

Sofoklis Giannakopoulos, a researcher at the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC), has designed Pylos, a 3D printer that utilizes a natural, biodegradable, cheap, recyclable and local material that everyone is familiar with: the earth.  

In an effort to make 3D printing a “large scale construction approach” even in years of economic and environmental turmoil, Pylos explores the structural potential of soil, a material that has been widely used in vernacular architecture around the world, and particularly in the Global South. 

Learn more about the printer after the break.

Monocle 24 Report from the CityLab Summit

04:00 - 30 October, 2015
Monocle 24 Report from the CityLab Summit, River Thames, London. Image Courtesy of Monocle 24
River Thames, London. Image Courtesy of Monocle 24

For this edition of The UrbanistMonocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities," the team report from the two-day CityLab summit, which "gathered the world’s top mayors and urban leaders for a series of chats on how to to make our cities a better place." They explore the vision for London’s transport infrastructure, discover how Rio de Janeiro is gearing up its digital strategy ahead of the 2016 Olympic Games, and find out how to create a smart city through data. On top of that, they chat to millennials in Washington and "sit down for a very honest chat with the mayor of Athens."

HQ's Blooming Flowers React to the Presence of Pedestrians

16:00 - 29 October, 2015
HQ's Blooming Flowers React to the Presence of Pedestrians, © HQ Architects
© HQ Architects

Shade isn't hard to find in Jerusalem's Vallero Square, thanks to these giant urban flowers designed by HQ Architects that bloom in the presence of pedestrians. "Warde," as the installation is called, is a set of four inflatable flowers at the entrance of the city's market square and adjacent tram station that "open up" whenever pedestrians walk by or the tram is approaching.

MAD's George Lucas Museum Wins Approval in Chicago

14:00 - 29 October, 2015
MAD's George Lucas Museum Wins Approval in Chicago, Updated design for the Lucas Museum in Chicago. Image © Lucas Museum of Narrative Art / MAD
Updated design for the Lucas Museum in Chicago. Image © Lucas Museum of Narrative Art / MAD

The Chicago City Council has voted to approve zoning for George Lucas' controversial, MAD-designed Lucas Museum of Narrative Art. Planned for a lakefront site on Chicago's Museum Campus park, near the Shedd Aquarium and Field Museum, the "mountainous" design faced opposition from environmentalists who claim the building is a "confiscation of public land." Despite this, and according to reports on NBC News, the Star Wars director won the Council's approval by promising more parking and tailgating space to Chicago Bears fans.

“The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art will be an incredible addition to Chicago’s Museum Campus,” said Mayor Emanuel in an official statement. “The Lucas Museum will join the 56 other museums in Chicago to provide new cultural and educational benefits for generations to come. And the new parkland will add more open greenspace that will be enjoyed by residents across the city.”   

A Short History of Yekaterinburg's Constructivist Architecture

09:30 - 29 October, 2015
A Short History of Yekaterinburg's Constructivist Architecture, © Denis Esakov
© Denis Esakov

Constructivist architecture is most often remembered in writing and on paper. The movement’s two most radical and recognized structures, Vladimir Tatlin’s “Monument to the Third International” and El Lissitzky’s “Lenin Tribune,”  were never built at scales larger than models. Taking hold in the wake of the Russian Revolution of 1917, Constructivism was the result of Cubo-Futurist artists marrying their kineticism and abstraction to the social concerns of the Bolsheviks, in the hopes of using art as a platform to motivate changes in society. Viewing the museum establishment as a “mauseoleum of art,” in 1918 the new broadsheet Art of the Commune affirmed: “The proletariat will create new houses, new streets, new objects of everyday life...Art of the proletariat is not a holy shrine where things are lazily regarded, but work, a factory which produces new artistic things.”[1]

In spite of the predominance of "paper architecture" in the history of Constructivism, there is one city that experienced the fruit of this movement to an unrivaled degree. Yekaterinburg is Russia’s fourth-largest city, home to nearly 1.5 million people. It is also the largest concentration of Constructivist architecture anywhere in the world, with approximately 140 structures. To celebrate the importance of Yekaterinburg in the history of architecture, photographer Denis Esakov has shared his images of the city's architecture with ArchDaily.

© Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov +34

Documentary On Torre David, Once The World's Tallest Slum, Released Online

15:00 - 28 October, 2015

In 1994, after the death of its main investor and a national banking crisis that left Venezuela's economy stagnated, the construction of Caracas' Centro Financiero Confinanzas - known popularly as the Tower of David - was paralyzed, leaving the building completely abandoned and on 70 percent complete.

Neglected for more than a decade, the 45-story, 190-meter-tall skyscraper became the makeshift home for a community of more than 800 families, becoming the world's tallest "vertically organized favela," with basic services to the 22nd floor and including even barber shops, kindergartens and dentists.

The documentary Torre David (now available to watch in full for a small fee of $3) was filmed by Urban-Think Tank, presenting the particular life of its residents before the tower was evacuated in 2014. The film is part of a larger research project that has led to new a book and numerous exhibitions, including the exhibition winner of the Golden Lion at the 2012 Venice Biennale.

Click here to watch the full documentary.

10 Compete to Revitalize Los Angeles’ Oldest Park

14:00 - 28 October, 2015
10 Compete to Revitalize Los Angeles’ Oldest Park, Los Angeles' Pershing Square in 2012. Image © John O'Neill via Wikipedia's GFDL License
Los Angeles' Pershing Square in 2012. Image © John O'Neill via Wikipedia's GFDL License

Ten practices from around the world have been shortlisted in a competition that aims to transform Los Angeles' Pershing Square one of Southern California's top destinations. Located on a five-acre plot in the city's downtown, Pershing Square is Los Angeles' oldest park. Each semi-finalist has been challenged to develop proposals based off of experiences. A small selection of finalists will be selected in December to move on to the competition's final phase.  

The 10 semifinalists are:

Field Operations to Design National Building Museum's Next Summer Installation

12:00 - 28 October, 2015
Field Operations to Design National Building Museum's Next Summer Installation, Tongva Park overlook. Image © Tim Street Porter, courtesy of Field Operations
Tongva Park overlook. Image © Tim Street Porter, courtesy of Field Operations

James Corner Field Operations has been chosen to design the National Building Museum's 2016 Summer Block Party installation. Just like its predecessors, including Snarkitecture's popular BEACH and BIG's massive Labyrinth, the installation will take over the Museum's Great Hall. With the design in its preliminary stages, little has been revealed. However, its mission is to "present innovative, interactive experiences that experiment with new ways of seeing and understanding the built environment."

“We are very excited about this opportunity to once again transform the Great Hall for summer spectacle and pleasure,” said James Corner, adding that “it will be a great challenge to surpass the genius of previous installations, but also an opportunity to explore something new and unexpected.” 

LCD's VULCAN Awarded Guinness World Record for Largest 3D Printed Structure

11:30 - 28 October, 2015
LCD's VULCAN Awarded Guinness World Record for Largest 3D Printed Structure, Courtesy of Laboratory for Creative Design and Beijing Design Week
Courtesy of Laboratory for Creative Design and Beijing Design Week

Guinness World Records has awarded the title of "largest 3D printed structure" to VULCAN, a temporary pavilion designed by the Beijing-based Laboratory for Creative Design (LCD). Made up of 1023 individually printed segments, the structure was 9.08 meters long and 2.88 meters tall, and took 30 days to print and a further 12 days to assemble. The pavilion was on display earlier this month at Beijing Design Week, located in Beijing's Parkview Green retail center.

Courtesy of Laboratory for Creative Design and Beijing Design Week Courtesy of Laboratory for Creative Design and Beijing Design Week Courtesy of Laboratory for Creative Design and Beijing Design Week Courtesy of Laboratory for Creative Design and Beijing Design Week +19

Installation at London's Southbank Centre Opens Archive to the Public

04:00 - 28 October, 2015
Installation at London's Southbank Centre Opens Archive to the Public, © Dirk Lindner
© Dirk Lindner

The Southbank Centre—a large complex of Grade One listed, Modernist cultural venues on the banks of the River Thames—are poised to refurbish three of their most loved spaces: the Queen Elizabeth Hall, the Purcell Room and the Hayward Gallery. As part of this transformation, London-based practice Jonathan Tuckey Design (JTD) have been commissioned to create a new 'Archive Studio' set within the foyer of the Royal Festival Hall, all part and parcel of the Southbank Centre’s desire to open up access to their collections and archives. JTD's free-standing, self-supporting structure is "an open framework which makes the scale the archival process apparent to visitors, held together by polished brass nuts and bolts and clad in perforated hardboard."