Photographer Chris Forsyth on the Montreal Metro, Going Underground, and Overlooked Architecture

12:00 - 27 March, 2015
Jean-Drapeau Station. Image © Chris Forsyth
Jean-Drapeau Station. Image © Chris Forsyth

Montreal-based photographer Chris Forsyth doesn't see his city the way others do -- that much is evident from his body of work, which includes rooftop photos of the Montreal skyline, nocturnal shots taken from the arm of a crane and now, images from the underground. The Montreal Metro Project is Forsyth's latest series, documenting the often overlooked architecture of the urban subway since October 2014.

Composed of 68 stations, each designed by a different architect between the 60s and 70s, the Montreal Metro system is as diverse and idiosyncratic as the city it underpins. Forsyth captures the stations empty of passengers, highlighting their architecture and reframing them in a manner rarely experienced.  ArchDaily spoke to Forsyth about the series and the creative process behind it. Read his responses and view selected images from The Montreal Metro project after the break. 

Lasalle Station. Image © Chris Forsyth Radisson Station. Image © Chris Forsyth De La Savane Station. Image © Chris Forsyth Jarry Station. Image © Chris Forsyth +6

LOBBY #2: Projecting Forward, Looking Back

09:30 - 27 March, 2015
© Cameron Clarke
© Cameron Clarke

From Vitruvius to Le Corbusier, words and writing have always played an essential role in architectural discourse. One could argue that crafting words is akin to orchestrating space: indeed, history’s most notable architects and designers are often remembered for their written philosophies as much as they are for their built works.

With the exception of a few of architecture’s biggest names, the majority of practicing architects no longer exploit the inherent value writing offers as a means for spatial and theoretical communication. This trend is exacerbated by the fact that many architectural schools place little emphasis on the once-primary subjects of history and literature, resulting in a generation of architects who struggle to articulate their ideas in words, resulting in an ever-growing proliferation of ill-defined “archispeak.”

LOBBY is an attempt from students of London’s Bartlett School of Architecture to reclaim the potency of the written word, presenting in their second issue an ambitious array of in-house research and external contributions. The theme is Clairvoyance, and the journal seeks to investigate the ways in which architects are forced to constantly grapple with the possibilities and uncertainties of designing spaces that exist in the intangible realm of the world-to-be.

© Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke +11

Shortlist Announced For 2015 RIBA Yorkshire Awards

04:00 - 27 March, 2015
Shortlisted: Sheffield Cathedral, Sheffield / Thomas Ford and Partners. Image © Exposure Property Marketing
Shortlisted: Sheffield Cathedral, Sheffield / Thomas Ford and Partners. Image © Exposure Property Marketing

A total of eleven projects have been shortlisted for RIBA Yorkshire 2015 Awards, featuring buildings by Populous, HLM, and Studio Gedye. All shortlisted buildings will now be assessed by a regional jury. Regional winners will then be considered for a RIBA National Award in recognition of their architectural excellence, the results of which will place some projects in the running for the 2015 RIBA Stirling Prize" href="http://www.archdaily.com/tag/riba-stirling-prize/" rel="tag">RIBA Stirling Prize.

See the complete list of shortlisted projects after the break.

RIBA Competition Seeks Ideas for a Sustainable Future of World’s Remotest Inhabited Island

19:00 - 26 March, 2015
Edinburgh of the Seven Seas. Image © Flickr CC user michaelclarke
Edinburgh of the Seven Seas. Image © Flickr CC user michaelclarke

At the request of the Tristan da Cunha government, RIBA has launched of a design competition in search of ideas for a more self-sustainable and innovative future of Edinburgh of the Seven Seas community on the remotest inhabited island in the world.

Situated 1,750 miles southwest of Cape Town in the South Atlantic Ocean, Tristan da Cunha’s activity is largely governed by the severe maritime weather. Only reachable some 60 days annually, the island’s community of Edinburgh of the Seven Seas is home to 270 people. Of the four islands Tristan da Cunha contains (two of which are UNESCO World Heritage sites), it is the only one to support a permanent residence.

Zumthor and Mendes da Rocha Join AMERICAnodelsud Conference in Paraguay

16:00 - 26 March, 2015

AMERICAnodelsud is an organization committed to social equality, promoting investigations and the development of new knowledge within the field of architecture. One of their main objectives is to raise funds to sponsor projects that will bridge the social exclusion gap.

Architects Alejandro Aravena (Santiago, Chile), Solano Benitez (Asuncion, Paraguay), Angelo Bucci (Sao Paulo, Brazil), Rafael Iglesia (Rosario, Argentina), José María Saez (Quito, Ecuador) and Ricardo Sargiotti (Córdoba, Argentina) held the first convention in 2013. Through the 'america[no] del sur' tour, which consisted of three conferences held in different cities in Argentina, they sought to raise the necessary funding.

On April 15th and 17th, Asunción, Paraguay will host the upcoming fundraiser, which Peter Zumthor and Paulo Mendes da Rocha have already agreed to attend in order to support the cause. Without a doubt, the presence of these two internationally-renowned architects will greatly help raise the funds needed by AMERICAnodelsud to follow through with their commitment. 

Read AMERICAnodelsud's charter for this year's edition, written by Solano Benitez, below. 

5 Ideas Shaping the Future of Architecture

12:15 - 26 March, 2015
Peter Rosegger Nursing Home / Dietger Wissounig Architekten. Image © Paul Ott
Peter Rosegger Nursing Home / Dietger Wissounig Architekten. Image © Paul Ott

Taking input from 2015's most innovative designers, Fast Company Design has complied a fascinating list of 25 ideas that will shape the future of design. From this list, we have extracted the five most relevant points for architects to consider. Read through them after the break, and let us know your thoughts in the comment section below. 

The World's Tallest Buildings Throughout History

08:00 - 26 March, 2015
Burj Khalifa. Image © Flickr CC user Colin Capelle
Burj Khalifa. Image © Flickr CC user Colin Capelle

Graphic artist and designer Martin Vargic of Halcyon Maps has created a fascinating set of infographics that showcase both the cultural typologies of each continent's architecture as well as the evolution of its tallest buildings throughout history. Exploring the progression of height differences of the tallest buildings in Europe, North America, Asia, Africa, South America, and Oceania, Vargic's visually-striking charts detail 5,000 years of building history, from ancient to modern times.

Check out the charts, after the break.

Register Now for Life of an Architect's 4th Annual Playhouse Competition

07:00 - 26 March, 2015
Courtesy of Life of an Architect
Courtesy of Life of an Architect

Bob Borson of Life of an Architect has announced the 2015 Architect Playhouse Competition, now in its fourth year. The competition is free to join, open to everyone, and assists the Dallas CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates), an organization that helps abused and neglected children. Organized and funded by Borson, it asks participants to design a playhouse that embodies originality, creativity, and can be constructed for $5000 or less. The winners (between two and five entries) will have their designs built and displayed at the Dallas CASA Parade of Playhouses, where they will be raffled to benefit the nonprofit organization. Registration is open now and designs must be submitted by April 20th. Winners will be announced May 4th. Check out last year's winners after the break, and visit here to register.

RIBA Agrees Upon Major Changes To UK Architectural Education

04:00 - 26 March, 2015

Exactly one year ago an important event took place. A gathering of seventy student delegates, organised by the Architecture Students Network (ASN), met to discuss the future of architectural education. Their meeting was sparked by the latest directive from the European Union which seeks to “establish more uniformity across Europe by aligning the time it takes to qualify”, making mutual recognition of the architect’s title easier between countries.

The ASN’s discussions concluded that the course content throughout the UK system of ‘Part I, II, and III’, and the duration of said course, urgently needs to be re-evaluated in order to reflect the changing needs of the profession - especially in light of the recent rise in tuition fees and associated university costs. Back then, a spokesperson for the ASN said that “it really felt like momentum for change has finally reached a tipping point.”

See Inside Le Corbusier's Mind with These 5 Paintings

19:00 - 25 March, 2015
Taureau (Bull), 1956; Sheet metal plaque, enameled (Unique work, painted with enamel on sheet metal by Le Corbusier and fired in the studio of Jean Martin in Luynes) (46 x 55 cm). Image © Galerie Eric Mouchet – Galerie Zlotowski
Taureau (Bull), 1956; Sheet metal plaque, enameled (Unique work, painted with enamel on sheet metal by Le Corbusier and fired in the studio of Jean Martin in Luynes) (46 x 55 cm). Image © Galerie Eric Mouchet – Galerie Zlotowski

Marking the fiftieth anniversary of Le Corbusier’s death, Galerie Eric Mouchet is collaborating with Galerie Zlotowski to showcase Le Corbusier: Panorama of a Lifetime’s Work in Paris. The exhibition, opening April 23 and on view through July 25, will provide a comprehensive overview of paintings, drawings and engravings of the legendary Le Corbusier. 

Construction of Sagrada Família Accelerated by 3-D Printing Technology

14:00 - 25 March, 2015
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família

As reported by the BBC, construction of Antoni Gaudí's already 133-year-old Sagrada Família in Barcelona is now being accelerated by one of the most modern technologies around: 3-D printing. As a matter of fact, the construction process in Barcelona has been utilizing 3-D printing for 14 years, introducing the technology in 2001 as a way of speeding up the prototyping of the building's many complex components.

The process uses powder-based stereolithographic 3-D printers, which build prototypes layer-by-layer, resulting in a material similar to plaster. This is important to the workshop at the Sagrada Família, because it allows craftsmen to easily alter the prototypes by hand, to meet the demanding specifications of the building.

Morphosis Unveils Plans for 381-Meter-Tall Skyscraper in Vals

12:36 - 25 March, 2015
© Morphosis Architects
© Morphosis Architects

Morphosis Architectshighly anticipated plans for a new luxury hotel in Vals has been unveiled. The proposal, selected by 7132 Ltd (and denounced by the jury) following an international competition, was lauded by the client for its “minimalist approach” that will “help the hotel blend with the mountain landscape at the existing resort campus.” 

The ultra-thin, 381-meter-tall tower will be one of three Pritzker laureate-designed projects at the 7132 resort, joining Peter Zumthor’s Therme Vals Spa and Tadao Ando’s Valser Path, which is slated for completion in 2017.

More images and a response from Tadao Ando, after the break. 

Podium. Image © Morphosis Architects Lobby. Image © Morphosis Architects Suite. Image © Morphosis Architects Penthouse. Image © Morphosis Architects +8

Emerging Objects Creates "Bloom" Pavilion from 3D Printed Cement

11:30 - 25 March, 2015
© Matthew Millman Photography
© Matthew Millman Photography

Following on from other experiments in 3-D Printing including a proposal for a house printed from salt and an earthquake resistant column inspired by Incan masonry, the California-based Emerging Objects team has created Bloom, a pavilion constructed from 840 unique blocks 3-D printed from portland cement.

The 9-foot (2.7 meter) tall pavilion is cruciform in plan, morphing as it rises to become the same cruciform shape twisted by 45 degrees. On the facade of the pavilion, perforations are mapped onto the cement blocks to create a design inspired by traditional Thai flower patterns.

© Matthew Millman Photography © Matthew Millman Photography © Matthew Millman Photography © Matthew Millman Photography +16

Serpentine Gallery Reveals SelgasCano's Colorful Design for 2015 Pavilion

08:50 - 25 March, 2015
Serpentine Pavilion designed by SelgasCano 2015, day view. Image © Steven Kevin Howson / SelgasCano
Serpentine Pavilion designed by SelgasCano 2015, day view. Image © Steven Kevin Howson / SelgasCano

The Serpentine Gallery has unveiled SelgasCano's designs for the 2015 Serpentine Pavilion in London, revealing a brightly-colored "chrysalis" structure created from a double skin of ETFE membrane wrapped in webbing. The Madrid-based duo were announced as the project's designers in December, joining the prestigious list of past pavilion designers which includes SANAA (2009)Jean Nouvel (2010)Peter Zumthor (2011)Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012)Sou Fujimoto (2013), and last year's designer Smiljan Radić, among many others.

More on the pavilion, and SelgasCano's statement after the break.

Bengal Institute for Architecture, Landscapes, and Settlements Launches in Bangladesh

06:00 - 25 March, 2015
Courtesy of Bengal Foundation
Courtesy of Bengal Foundation

At the Bengal Foundation's conference, EngageDhaka 2015, ArchDaily learned of the newly launched Bengal Architecture and Design Institute.  With a focus on the pursuit of innovation in the lived environment with a focus on human interactions, the forum will enable open dialogue on improving our environments through the lens of architecture, landscape, and settlement for better livability. Bringing together local and international professionals and educators, the Institute will provide a series of lectures, discussions, workshops, and exhibitions to better understand the possibilities within these areas, especially when unified.

The Surreal Architectural Collages Of Matthias Jung

04:25 - 25 March, 2015
Expedition to the East Pole. Image © Matthias Jung
Expedition to the East Pole. Image © Matthias Jung

Matthias Jung's fascination for the medium of collage began in his father's photolab. And so, "with scissors and glue, the first fantastic buildings were made." In early 2015 Jung, a German artist and graphic designer, created seven images as part of a series which he entitled 'Houses', of which many of this selection originate. Uniquely, every piece of each collage originates from one of Jung's original photographs which are collected and then reassembled. The majority of these photographs were taken during trips in northeastern Germany.

See a selection of Jung's fantastical architectural collages after the break.

Land of Evening. Image © Matthias Jung An Sgurr. Image © Matthias Jung Maternity Unit. Image © Matthias Jung Ostheim. Image © Matthias Jung +11

5 Proposals Reimagine Toronto Ferry Terminal and Waterfront Park

19:00 - 24 March, 2015
Harbour Landing Ferry Terminal / KBMP Architects, West 8, Greenburg Consultants. Image Courtesy of WATERFRONToronto
Harbour Landing Ferry Terminal / KBMP Architects, West 8, Greenburg Consultants. Image Courtesy of WATERFRONToronto

Waterfront Toronto has unveiled five proposals for the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal and Harbour Square Park design competition. The finalists were tasked with transforming Toronto's waterfront by revitalizing the existing ferry terminal and park through an extensive gradually-implemented masterplan. See all five proposals, including designs by nARCHITECTS and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, after the break.

Clement Blanchet Architecture, Batlle i Roig, RTVR, Scott Torrance, Landscape Architect Inc.. Image Courtesy of WATERFRONToronto Diller Scofidio + Renfro, architectsAlliance, Hood Design. Image Courtesy of WATERFRONToronto Quadrangle Architects, aLLDesign, Janet Rosenburg & Studio. Image Courtesy of WATERFRONToronto View from Ferry - Jack Layton City Terminal Park / Clement Blanchet Architecture, Batlle i Roig, RTVR, Scott Torrance, Landscape Architect Inc.. Image Courtesy of WATERFRONToronto +22

Chinese Company Builds 57-Story Skyscraper in 19 Days

17:10 - 24 March, 2015
via BSB
via BSB

“Three floors in a day is China’s new normal,” says a representative for this 57-floor skyscraper that was built in just 19 days. Known as the “Mini Sky City” tower in Changsha, the 180,000-square-meter mixed-use building was built in record speed with modular, “LEGO-like” blocks. The process also claimed to have required less materials and significantly reduced the amount of air pollution commonly caused by dusty construction sites. 

A time-lapse of the construction process, after the break.