All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Shigeru Ban Architects

Shigeru Ban Architects: The Latest Architecture and News

The Architecture of Pompidou Metz: An Excerpt from "The Architecture of Art Museums – A Decade of Design: 2000 – 2010"

01:00 - 18 May, 2014
© Didier Boy De La Tour
© Didier Boy De La Tour

In honor of International Museum Day, we're taking a look back at the 21st century's most exciting museums. The following is an excerpt from the recently released book, The Architecture of Art Museums – A Decade of Design: 2000 – 2010 (Routledge) by Ronnie Self, a Houston-based architect. Each chapter of the book provides technical, comprehensive coverage of a particular influential art museum. In total, eighteen of the most important art museums of the early twenty-first century - including works from Tadao Ando, Herzog & de Meuron, SANAA, Steven Holl, and many other high-profile architects - are explored. The following is a condensed version of the chapter detailing Shigeru Ban and Jean de Gastines' 2010 classic, Centre Pompidou-Metz.

The Pompidou Center – Metz was a first experiment in French cultural decentralization. In the late 1990’s, with the prospect of closing Piano and Roger’s building in Paris for renovations, the question arose of how to maintain some of the 60,000 works in the collection of the National Museum of Modern Art available for public viewing. A concept of “hors les murs” or “beyond the walls” was developed to exhibit works in other French cities. The temporary closing of the Pompidou Center – Paris spurred reflections on ways to present the national collection to a wider audience in general. Eventually a second Pompidou Center in another French city was imagined.

© Didier Boy De La Tour Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects © Didier Boy De La Tour Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects + 11

Big Ideas, Small Buildings: Some of Architecture's Best, Tiny Projects

01:00 - 15 May, 2014
Big Ideas, Small Buildings: Some of Architecture's Best, Tiny Projects, Suzuko Yamada, Pillar House, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Iwan Baan/TASCHEN
Suzuko Yamada, Pillar House, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Iwan Baan/TASCHEN

This post was originally published in The Architectural Review as "Size Doesn't Matter: Big Ideas for Small Buildings."

Taschen’s latest volume draws together the architectural underdogs that, despite their minute, whimsical forms, are setting bold new trends for design.

When economies falter and construction halts, what happens to architecture? Rather than indulgent, personal projects, the need for small and perfectly formed spaces is becoming an economic necessity, pushing designers to go further with less. In their new volume Small: Architecture Now!, Taschen have drawn together the teahouses, cabins, saunas and dollhouses that set the trends for the small, sensitive and sustainable, with designers ranging from Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban to emerging young practices.

Terunobu Fujimori, Beetle's House, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK. Image Courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum, London/TASCHEN Jorge Gracia, Endémico Resguardo Silvestre, Valle de Guadalupe, Ensenada, Mexico. Image © Undine Pröhl/TASCHEN Kota Mizuishi, Riverside House Suginami, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Hiroshi Tanigawa/TASCHEN Olson Kundig, Delta Shelter, Mazama, Washington, USA. Image © Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN + 14

Ban vs. Schumacher: Should Architects Assume Social Responsibility?

01:00 - 28 March, 2014
Ban vs. Schumacher: Should Architects Assume Social Responsibility?, Guangzhou Opera House, Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Iwan Baan
Guangzhou Opera House, Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Iwan Baan


A Selection of Shigeru Ban's Best Work

01:00 - 24 March, 2014
Nine Bridges Golf Club. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai
Nine Bridges Golf Club. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai

Explore the architectural development of Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban - from his early, more minimalist residential work in the 90s to his experimental, undulating structures (2010's Pompidou Metz, Nine Bridges Golf Club) to his latest masterpiece in timber construction, Tamedia New Office Building (2013).

Paper Temporary Studio. Image © Didier Boy de la Tour Curtain Wall House. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai Centre Pompidou Metz. Image © Didier Boy de la Tour Nicolas G Hayek Center. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai + 28

The Humanitarian Works of Shigeru Ban

01:00 - 24 March, 2014
Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Stephen Goodenough
Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Stephen Goodenough

Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban may be as well known for his innovative use of materials as for his compassionate approach to design. For a little over three decades, Ban, the founder of the Voluntary Architects Network, has applied his extensive knowledge of recyclable materials, particularly paper and cardboard, to constructing high-quality, low-cost shelters for victims of disaster across the world - from Rwanda, to Haiti, to Turkey, Japan, and more. We've rounded up images of Ban's humanitarian work - get inspired after the break.

Paper Log House India. Image © Kartikeya Shodhan Hualin Temporary Elementary School. Image © Li Jun Onagawa Container Temporary Housing. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Stephen Goodenough + 26

Shigeru Ban Selected to Design Mount Fuji World Heritage Center

00:00 - 17 March, 2014
Shigeru Ban Selected to Design Mount Fuji World Heritage Center, Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects
Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects

Shigeru Ban was pulled from a selection of 238 competitors as the “best person” to design the new Mount Fuji World Heritage Center in the Shizuoka Prefecture of Japan. The 4,300 square meter structure is expected to cost up to ¥2.4 billion and complete in the year 2016. We will keep you posted as more detail become available.

Museum Round Up: The Box is Back

00:00 - 21 November, 2013
Clyfford Still Museum. Image ©  Jeremy Bittermann
Clyfford Still Museum. Image © Jeremy Bittermann

In a recent article for the Denver Post, Ray Rinaldi discusses how the box is making a comeback in U.S. museum design. Stating how architecture in the 2000’s was a lot about swoops, curves, and flying birds - see Frank Gehry and Santiago Calatrava - he points out the cool cubes of David Chipperfield and Renzo Piano. We've rounded up some of these boxy works just for you: the Clyfford Still Museum, the Kimbell Art Museum Expansion, The St. Louis Art Museum's East Building, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien's Barnes Foundation, and Shigeru Ban's Aspen Art Museum. Each project begins to show how boxes can be strong, secure, and even sly. Check out more about the article here.

Newly Released Photos of Shigeru Ban's Cardboard Cathedral in New Zealand

01:00 - 24 August, 2013
Newly Released Photos of Shigeru Ban's Cardboard Cathedral in New Zealand, © Bridgit Anderson
© Bridgit Anderson

Shigeru Ban’s Cardboard Cathedral is officially open to the public, just over two years after the crippling 6.3 magnitude earthquake ravished the New Zealand town of Christchurch. With an expected lifespan of 50 years, the temporary cathedral will serve as a replacement for the city’s iconic 1864 Anglican cathedral - one of Christchurch’s most prized landmarks - until a more permanent structure is built.

TEDxTokyo: Emergency Shelters Made from Paper / Shigeru Ban

00:00 - 14 August, 2013

Disappointed that most architecture is built for the privileged, rather than society, Shigeru Ban has dedicated much of his career to building affordable, livable and safe emergency shelters for post-disaster areas. As described by TED:

Long before sustainability became a buzzword, architect Shigeru Ban had begun his experiments with ecologically-sound building materials such as cardboard tubes and paper. His remarkable structures are often intended as temporary housing, designed to help the dispossessed in disaster-struck nations such as Haiti, Rwanda, or Japan. Yet equally often the buildings remain a beloved part of the landscape long after they have served their intended purpose.

Update: Aspen Art Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects

17:30 - 10 August, 2013
© Shigeru Ban Architects
© Shigeru Ban Architects

With ever-expanding traveling exhibitions attracting over 35,000 yearly visitors from around the globe, the Aspen Art Museum (AAM) has outgrown their cozy 9,000 square foot facility in which they have called home since their established in 1979. Japanese architect Shigeru Ban has been commissioned to design the new museum, being the first museum he has constructed in the U.S. The project is set for completion in August 2014. Continue reading for more information.

Video: IE Paper Pavilion / Shigeru Ban Architects

00:00 - 22 June, 2013

Shigeru Ban Architects shared with us their timelapse video for their latest construction, the IE Paper Pavilion. Made up of 173 paper tubes, this temporary structure is located in the grounds of IE’s Madrid campus and will be used to host executive education events and other activities. The structural design is eminently efficient. It took only two weeks to build, is based on sustainability objectives, and there was a requirement that it be a temporary construction. For more information on the project, please visit here.

Shigeru Ban's Cardboard Cathedral Underway in New Zealand

00:00 - 17 March, 2013
Courtesy of Christchurch City Libraries' Flickr
Courtesy of Christchurch City Libraries' Flickr

Shigeru Ban just can’t get enough of paper tubes. The Japanese architect, renowned for his design of structures that can be quickly and inexpensively erected in disaster zones, is at it again in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, which was hit hard by a devastating earthquake last February. The earthquake of magnitude 6.3 killed over 200 people and inflicted irreparable damage on the city’s iconic gothic cathedral of 132 years. The cathedral was a copy of one in Oxford, England, and was one of the most famous landmarks of the Christchurch, pictured on postcards, souvenirs and tea towels.

A pioneer in so-called “emergency architecture,” Shigeru Ban has begun construction on a highly anticipated, unique replacement: a simple A-frame structure composed of paper tubes of equal length and 20 foot containers. The tubes will be coated with waterproof polyurethane and flame retardants that the architect has been developing since 1986 - years before environmental friendliness and the use of inexpensive recycled materials were even a concern in architecture.

Read more about Ban's visionary Cardboard Cathedral after the break...

ANTIVJ Transforms Shigeru Ban's Centre Pompidou Metz with Digital Spectacular

00:00 - 11 March, 2013

Intrigued by the hexagonal plan and complex structure of Shigeru Ban’s Centre Pompidou Metz in France, ANTIVJ visual artists Simon Geilfus and Yannick Jacquet, and composer Thomas Vaquié transformed the building’s undulating facade into a digital spectacular with a light show that “abolishes notions of scale by contrasting micro-architecture with human construction”. The piece was loosely inspired by the research of deep-sea expert Peter A. Rona, whose work explores the fascinating marks left by unknown, hexagonal-shaped sea creature called Paleodictyon Nodosum, which Rona believes is designed to cultivate bacteria.

Learn more and watch the making of after the break...

Interview with Shigeru Ban by Martha Thorne

20:00 - 1 November, 2010

IE School of Architecture shared with us the interview that Associate Dean of External Relations, Martha Thorne conducted with innovative Japanese architect Shigeru Ban at Hay Festival Segovia, Spain.