JR Onagawa Station / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Hiroyuki Hirai

Architects: Shigeru Ban Architects
Location: Onagawa Station, Onagawahama, Onagawa, Oshika District, Miyagi Prefecture 986-2261,
Area: 600.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Hiroyuki Hirai

Help Shigeru Ban Provide Emergency Shelter to Nepal

’s permanent paper housing in India. Image © Kartikeya Shodhan

Shigeru Ban Architects, together with the Voluntary Architects’ Network (VAN), has announced plans to send emergency shelter, housing and other community facilitates to the victims of Nepal’s deadly April 25th earthquake. As part of a three-phase plan, Shigeru Ban will first delivery and assemble tents with plastic partitions acquired though donation to provide immediate shelter. A few months after, the Japanese practice will collaborate with local architects and students to build housing with materials found prevalent in Nepal.

Permanent housing will also be provided in the architect-led recovery plan’s third phase, although little details have been released. However, you can help make it happen by donating to Shigeru Ban’s efforts (here).

Watch Shigeru Ban’s TED Talk on paper emergency structures, after the break. 

Shigeru Ban on Growing Up, Carpentry, and Cardboard Tubes

’s Cardboard Cathedral in New Zealand. Image © Bridgit Anderson

He may have risen to prominence for his disaster relief architecture and deft use of recyclable materials, but Shigeru Ban describes his idiosyncratic use of material as an “accident.” Speaking to The Wall Street Journal, the 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate recalls turning to cardboard tubes as a matter of necessity. “I had to create a design for an exhibition,” Ban told the newspaper, “But I couldn’t afford wood. Instead, I used the many paper tubes from rolls of drafting paper that were lying around. The tubes turned out to be quite strong.” The most prominent of Ban’s cardboard tube structures is Christchurch’s Cardboard Cathedral, built in the aftermath of an earthquake that devastated the city in early 2011. Read WSJ’s full interview with Ban here.

The 14 Stories Behind the 2015 Building of the Year Award Winners

With our annual Building of the Year Awards, over 30,000 readers narrowed down over 3,000 projects, selecting just 14 as the best examples of architecture that has published in the past year. The results have been celebrated and widely shared, of course, usually in the form of images of each project. But what is often forgotten in this flurry of image sharing is that every one of these 14 projects has a backstory of significance which adds to our understanding of their architectural quality.

Some of these projects are intelligent responses to pressing social issues, others are twists on a well-established typology. Others still are simply supreme examples of architectural dexterity. In order that we don’t forget the tremendous amount of effort that goes into creating each of these architectural masterpieces, continue reading after the break for the 14 stories that defined this year’s Awards.

Winners of the 2015 Building of the Year Awards

After two weeks of nominations and voting, we are pleased to present the winners of the 2015 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards. As a peer-based, crowdsourced architecture award, the results shown here represent the collective intelligence of 31,000 architects, filtering the best architecture from over 3,000 projects featured on ArchDaily during the past year.

The winning buildings represent a diverse group of architects, from Pritzker Prize winners such as Álvaro Siza, Herzog & de Meuron and Shigeru Ban, to up-and-coming practices such as EFFEKT and Building which have so far been less widely covered by the media. In many cases their designs may be the most visually striking, but each also approaches its context and program in a unique way to solve social, environmental or economic challenges in communities around the world. By publishing them on ArchDaily, these buildings have helped us to impart inspiration and knowledge to architects around the world, furthering our mission. So to everyone who participated by either nominating or voting for a shortlisted project, thank you for being a part of this amazing process, where the voices of architects from all over the world unite to form one strong, intelligent, forward-thinking message.

Shigeru Ban to Construct Tainan Museum of Fine Arts

© Architects

Pritzker laureate Shigeru Ban has won an international competition to design the future Tainan Museum of Fine Arts. With an agenda to promote arts culture and tourism in Taiwan’s cultural capital, the museum will foster the research of arts, literature and history, while exhibiting local talent.

Cascading volumes featuring an auditorium, classrooms and exhibition galleries will be capped with a pentagonal roof canopy and softened with lush terraces and landscaping. An outdoor sculpture park and public recreation area will allow the museum’s inner contents to bleed into its surroundings and activate the city.

More images, after the break…

Aspen Art Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Michael Moran / OTTO

Architects: Shigeru Ban Architects
Location: 637 East Hyman Avenue, , CO 81611, USA
Area: 33000.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Michael Moran / OTTO, Derek Skalko

Live from Amsterdam: Pritzker Prize Award Ceremony with Shigeru Ban

The 2014 Pritzker Prize Ceremony to honor laureate is taking place today in Amsterdam at 17:00 UCT.

The ceremony will occur outside of the recently re-opened Rijksmuseum. Speakers will include Martha Thorne (Executive Director of the Prize), Eberhard van der Laan (Mayor of Amsterdam), Lord Palumbo (Chairman of the Prize), Tom Pritzker (Preisdent of the Hyatt Foundation), and the 2014 Laureate Shigeru Ban.

The Architecture of Pompidou Metz: An Excerpt from “The Architecture of Art Museums – A Decade of Design: 2000 – 2010″

© Didier Boy De La Tour

In honor of , we’re taking a look back at the 21st century’s most exciting museums. The following is an excerpt from the recently released book, The Architecture of Art – A Decade of Design: 2000 – 2010 (Routledge) by Ronnie Self, a Houston-based architect. Each chapter of the book provides technical, comprehensive coverage of a particular influential art museum. In total, eighteen of the most important art of the early twenty-first century - including works from Tadao Ando, Herzog & de Meuron, SANAA, Steven Holl, and many other high-profile architects - are explored. The following is a condensed version of the chapter detailing Shigeru Ban and Jean de Gastines’ 2010 classic, Centre Pompidou-Metz.

The Pompidou Center – Metz was a first experiment in French cultural decentralization. In the late 1990’s, with the prospect of closing Piano and Roger’s building in Paris for renovations, the question arose of how to maintain some of the 60,000 works in the collection of the National Museum of Modern Art available for public viewing. A concept of “hors les murs” or “beyond the walls” was developed to exhibit works in other French cities. The temporary closing of the Pompidou Center – Paris spurred reflections on ways to present the national collection to a wider audience in general. Eventually a second Pompidou Center in another French city was imagined.

Big Ideas, Small Buildings: Some of Architecture’s Best, Tiny Projects

Suzuko Yamada, Pillar House, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Iwan Baan/

This post was originally published in The Architectural Review as “Size Doesn’t Matter: Big Ideas for Small Buildings.

Taschen’s latest volume draws together the architectural underdogs that, despite their minute, whimsical forms, are setting bold new trends for design.

When economies falter and construction halts, what happens to architecture? Rather than indulgent, personal projects, the need for small and perfectly formed spaces is becoming an economic necessity, pushing designers to go further with less. In their new volume Small: Architecture Now!, Taschen have drawn together the teahouses, cabins, saunas and dollhouses that set the trends for the small, sensitive and sustainable, with designers ranging from Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban to emerging young practices.

Nine Bridges Country Club / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Hiroyuki Hirai

Architects: Shigeru Ban Architects
Location: , Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Architect In Charge: Shigeru Ban Collaborator: KACI International, Inc.
Client: CJ Group
Area: 20977.0 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Hiroyuki Hirai

Villa Vista / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Hiroyuki Hirai

Architects: Shigeru Ban Architects
Location: Weligama,
Architect In Charge: Europe/ Shigeru Ban, Yasunori Harano
Area: 825 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Hiroyuki Hirai

Ban vs. Schumacher: Should Architects Assume Social Responsibility?

Guangzhou Opera House, Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Iwan Baan

Last week, Patrik Schumacher, Zaha Hadid’s right-hand man, attempted to mandate the boundaries of Architecture in a social media post worthy of a Millennial. The tone was prescriptive and characterized by a liberal application of caps lock. In an ideal world, it might have been collectively ignored, but the discussion sprawled across multiple Facebook threads and inspired a broad media response (not to mention this one). I offer you a very reductive abstract: Architecture’s contribution to society is form, not political correctness and not art, which lacks a function beyond itself. A fair bit of the ensuing banter on Schumacher’s Facebook wall draws, then erases, then rehashes the distinction between art and architecture. With more than a hint of indignation, he specifically denounces the winners of the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale. He was not on the roster. Injured dignities aside, the commentary allowed a pervasive and omnipresent question within our discipline to resurface in the digital forum: What do architects offer that no one else can?

Centre Pompidou-Metz / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Didier Boy De La Tour

Architects: Shigeru Ban Architects
Location: Centre Pompidou-Metz, 1 Parvis des Droits de l’Homme, 57020 Metz, France
Area: 11330.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Didier Boy De La Tour

The Humanitarian Works of Shigeru Ban

Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Stephen Goodenough

Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban may be as well known for his innovative use of materials as for his compassionate approach to design. For a little over three decades, Ban, the founder of the Voluntary Architects Network, has applied his extensive knowledge of recyclable materials, particularly paper and cardboard, to constructing high-quality, low-cost shelters for victims of disaster across the world – from Rwanda, to Haiti, to Turkey, , and more. We’ve rounded up images of Ban’s humanitarian work – get inspired after the break.

A Selection of Shigeru Ban’s Best Work

Nine Bridges Golf Club. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai

Explore the architectural development of Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban – from his early, more minimalist residential work in the 90s to his experimental, undulating structures (2010′s Pompidou Metz, Nine Bridges Golf Club) to his latest masterpiece in timber construction, Tamedia New Office Building (2013).

Shigeru Ban Selected to Design Mount Fuji World Heritage Center

©

Shigeru Ban was pulled from a selection of 238 competitors as the “best person” to design the new World Heritage Center in the Shizuoka Prefecture of Japan. The 4,300 square meter structure is expected to cost up to ¥2.4 billion and complete in the year 2016. We will keep you posted as more details become available.

Tamedia Office Building / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Didier Boy de la Tour

Architects: Shigeru Ban Architects
Location: , Switzerland
Architect In Charge:
Area: 10,120 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Didier Boy de la Tour, Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects