Wood Encouragement Policy Coming To Australia

Cross Stitch House; Melbourne / FMD Architects. Image © Peter Bennetts

Latrobe City Council is pushing an initiative that would put “wood first.” If implemented, the “ Encouragement ” would educate architects and industry professionals about the structural and environmental benefits of wood in an effort to promote the local timber industry and use of sustainable building materials. Following the lead of the United States and New Zealand, both of which recently established “wood encouragement” policies, the council hopes that this will set a precedent that can be applied throughout the rest of Australia. 

2014 U.S. Wood Design Award Winners

Federal Center South Building 1202 / ZGF Architects © Benjamin Benschneider

WoodWorks, an initiative of the Wood Products Council, has announced the winners of its 2014 National Wood Design . Recognizing “outstanding projects that bring to life wood’s natural beauty and versatility in building design,” 13 projects have been selected from over 140 submissions for demonstrating “ingenuity in design or engineering.”

The 2014 National Wood Design Award Winners are…

Tall Tinder: Are Wooden Skyscrapers Really Fire Safe?

IZM - Illwerke Zentrum Montafon / Architekten Hermann Kaufmann ZT GmbH. Image © Norman A. Müller

While interest in tall timber buildings continues to grow, there still remains one obvious concern: combustibility. So how safe are timber structures really? Arup Connect spoke with Robert Gerard, a fire engineer in Arup’s San Francisco office, to find out how high-rise buildings take fire safety into account.

Six Essential Materials & The Architects That Love Them

In case you missed it, we’re re-publishing this popular post for your material pleasure. Enjoy!

To celebrate the recent launch of our US product catalog, ArchDaily Materials, we’ve coupled six iconic architects with what we deem to be their favourite or most frequently used material. From Oscar Neimeyer’s sinuous use of concrete to Kengo Kuma‘s innovative use of wood, which define some of the world’s best known architects?

Material Inspiration: 10 Projects Inspired by Wood

To celebrate the launch of ArchDaily Materials, our new product catalog, we’ve rounded up 10 awesome projects from around the world that were inspired by one material: . Check out the projects after the break…

Appleton Living / Minarc

© Gray

Architects: Minarc
Location: Venice, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Design Team: Tryggvi Thorsteinsson, Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir
Year: 2011
Photographs: Art Gray

The Case For Tall Wood Buildings

Courtesy of Michael Green Architecture

Michael Green is calling for a drastic paradigm shift in the way we build. Forget steel, straw, concrete and shipping containers; use wood to erect urban skyscrapers. In a 240 page report – complete with diagrams, plans, renders and even typical wooden curtain wall details – Green outlines a new way of designing and constructing tall buildings using mass timber, all the while addressing common misconceptions of , structure, sustainability, cost and climate concerns.

SOM Gets Behind Wooden Skyscraper Design

Courtesy of ArchDaily

Although known for their iconic skyscrapers of glass and steel, SOM has begun to redefine our idea of the high-rise by pushing for wood as an alternative material for tall buildings. Not only could it help solve the worldwide problem of housing for those who are or will live in cities, but wooden skyscrapers could also address by reducing a building’s carbon footprint. Click here to read about the structural system that has come up with and don’t check out our previous coverage on the equally fascinating Timber Tower Research Project!

Video: Koyasan Guest House / Alphaville Architects

Kyoto-based architects Kentaro Takeguchi and Asako Yamamoto of Alphaville Architects have completed a small guest house for tourists visiting the sacred Koyasan (Mt. Koya) in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. The 96 m2 (1,033 ft2) building contains bedrooms, capsule-style dormitory rooms, a bar, and lounge. Between the bar, hallway, and lounge, 2 x 4 and 2 x 6 frames are exposed inside at varying intervals to act as partitions

This video was provided by JA+U.

Hello Wood 2013: Step Closer!

POLIPHONY. Image © Kékesi Donát

Back for its fourth year, the creative camp Hello Wood was held last month in Hungary, set in the countryside north of Lake Balaton. At Hello , 120 young designers and architects worked with leading experts to create installations which approach issues of society and community in architecture, ideas encompassed by this year’s motto “Step Closer!” Twelve teams had one week to create these installations using timber as their primary material, with the projects being judged and a winner awarded at the end of the week.

Read on to find out about the installations, and which one was judged the winner, after the break

TED: Why We Should Build Wooden Skyscrapers / Michael Green

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Building a ? Forget about steel and , architect Michael Green says build it out of wood. As he details in this intriguing talk, it’s not only possible to build safe wooden structures up to 30 stories tall (and, he hopes, higher), it’s necessary.

Read more about Green’s ‘Case for Tall Buildings’ here and share your comments below.

Woodskin: The Flexible Timber Skin

Courtesy of MammaFotogramma

Have you ever wanted to create delicate, complex shapes from , but can’t because it’s too stiff and unforgiving? Well all that might soon change, thanks to Milan-based design studio MammaFotogramma. They have created a type of flexible, ‘Woodskin‘ triangular tiles of Russian plywood.

Read more about Woodskin after the break…

Billon / Vincent Kohler

© Geoffrey Cottenceau

This stunning installation, created by Swiss sculpter Vincent Kohler, beautifully deconstructs the log. Titled “Billon”, the 110 x 100 x 300 cm piece is made of , polystyrène, and résine.

Kita Göttingen / Despang Architekten

© Jochen Stüber

Architects: Despang Architekten
Location: Göttingen, Germany
Architects In Charge: Günther Despang/Martin Despang
Project Architects: Philip Hogrebe/Jörg Steveker
Area: 512 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Jochen Stüber, Olaf Baumann

AD Round Up: Wood Architecture Part II

© Iwan Baan

For today’s AD Round Up we have the 2nd selection of previously featured projects where is the principal character. The main image belongs to Sou Fujimoto’s amazing Final Wood House in Kumamoto, . Check out, Casa Kike designed by Gianni Botsford Architects, or the Floating House  in Ontario by MOS Architects. Take a look at the stunning Holiday House on the Rigi by AFGH. Finally, you can’t miss Bip Computers, a retail project with a great wood structure by Alberto Mozo.

TIMBER IN THE CITY: Urban Habitats Competition

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) is pleased to announce TIMBER IN THE CITY: Urban Habitats Competition for the 2012-2013 academic year. The competition is a partnership between the Binational Softwood Lumber Council (BSLC), the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) and the School of Constructed Environments at Parsons The New School for Design (SCE).

The program is intended to engage students and recent graduates, working individually or in teams to imagine the repurposing of our existing cities with buildings that are made from renewable resources, offer expedient affordable construction, innovate with new and old wooden , and provide healthy living / working environments.

Camera Obscura / AA Visiting School Eugene 2012

Courtesy of AA Visiting School Eugene

A small group of diverse students participating in the inaugural AA Visiting School Eugene were given the responsibility to design and build something that would enhance and reflect the forest, within a ten-day timeframe.

More on the after the break.

   

Interview: Krogmann Headquarters / Despang Architekten

© Olaf Baumann

The Headquarters Krogmann in Lohne-Kroge, Germany, by Despang Architekten investigates the numerous characteristics and fundamental opportunities inherent within wood and exhibits a modern approach to the craftsmanship of traditional German vernacular. Designed as a new corporate center of operations for the woodworking company Krogmann,  this new office would need to succeed not only in handcrafting a new image for them, but also serve as a catalyst for future growth while showcasing their ability as ‘makers’ in the field of .  Having worked as the builders for several projects for , their choice to retain them as the design architects for their own project was a natural extension of an already solid relationship built upon the dedication to quality and progressiveness. As an extension of this article, we also had the opportunity to speak with Principal and University of Hawaii Associate Professor Martin Despang about the process involved in the making of this project.

More details and our Q&A with Martin after the break.