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Mies Van Der Rohe: The Latest Architecture and News

Dirk Denison Renovates the Mies Van Der Rohe Bailey Hall

11:00 - 7 August, 2019
Dirk Denison Renovates the Mies Van Der Rohe Bailey Hall, Courtesy of Dirk Denison Architects
Courtesy of Dirk Denison Architects

The Mies van der Rohe residential building, the Bailey Hall built in 1955, at Illinois Institute of Technology will be subject to renovation works by Dirk Denison Architects. The Chicago-based firm will modernize the mechanical, structural, and interior works, modifying its original function, and introducing a new configuration to host up to 330 first- and second-year students, while the exterior will remain faithful to the original design and the ground floor lobby will still hold on to the Mies’ iconic recessed glass lobby.

AMO Helps to Curate Virgil Abloh Exhibition for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

11:00 - 12 June, 2019
AMO Helps to Curate Virgil Abloh Exhibition for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, © Nathan Keay, Courtesy of MCA Chicago
© Nathan Keay, Courtesy of MCA Chicago

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago is presenting an exhibition devoted to the work of the ultra-modern, genre-bending artist and designer Virgil Abloh. Titled “Virgil Abloh: Figures of Speech” the immersive space has been curated by the Museum's Chief Curator Michael Darling, and Samir Bantal, a director at OMA’s research wing, focusing on the creative process and collaborative work of Abloh who is redefining fashion, art, and design.

© Nathan Keay, Courtesy of MCA Chicago © Nathan Keay, Courtesy of MCA Chicago © Nathan Keay, Courtesy of MCA Chicago © Nathan Keay, Courtesy of MCA Chicago + 21

Mies van der Rohe's McCormick House Transformed by Color Installation

07:15 - 3 June, 2019
Mies van der Rohe's McCormick House Transformed by Color Installation, © John Faier
© John Faier

The Elmhurst Art Museum has unveiled details of a new installation taking place in the Mies van der Rohe-designed McCormick House in Chicago. Designed by Luftwerk, a Chicago-based artistic collaborative of Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero, the “Parallel Perspectives” installation is a site-specific exhibition that uses color and light interventions to activate and interpret the house, celebrating the use of geometry in the mid-Century prefab prototype.

© John Faier © John Faier © John Faier © John Faier + 14

Infographic: The Bauhaus, Where Form Follows Function

05:30 - 11 April, 2019

UPDATE: In honor of the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus, we’re re-publishing this popular infographic, which was originally published April 16th, 2012.

From the “starchitect” to “architecture for the 99%,” we are witnessing a shift of focus in the field of architecture. However, it’s in the education system where these ideas really take root and grow. This sea change inspired us to explore past movements, influenced by economic shifts, war and the introduction of new technologies, and take a closer look at the bauhaus movement.

Often associated with being anti-industrial, the Arts and Crafts Movement had dominated the field before the start of the Bauhaus in 1919. The Bauhaus’ focus was to merge design with industry, providing well-designed products for the many.

The Bauhaus not only impacted design and architecture on an international level, but also revolutionized the way design schools conceptualize education as a means of imparting an integrated design approach where form follows function.

This Illustrated Comic of Mies van der Rohe Features Text by Norman Foster

09:00 - 1 April, 2019
via Fundacio Mies van der Rohe
via Fundacio Mies van der Rohe

Agustín Ferrer Casas has published an illustrated comic book charting the life and work of the renowned architect Mies van der Rohe. Featuring texts by Anatxu Zabalbeascoa and Norman Foster, MIES is a biopic inspired by Ferrer Casas’ reading of Mies van der Rohe: Menos es más by Anatxu Zabalbeascoa.

The presentation of the graphic novel is part of the Fundacio Mies van der Rohe's efforts to support new languages for the dissemination of knowledge of architecture that will be of interest to both professionals and those who want to learn about modern architecture through a rich, visual medium.

Spotlight: Mies van der Rohe

03:30 - 27 March, 2019
Spotlight: Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona Pavilion. Image © Gili Merin
Barcelona Pavilion. Image © Gili Merin

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (27 March 1886 – 17 August 1969) is one of the most influential architects of the 20th century, known for his role in the development of the most enduring architectural style of the era: modernism. Born in Aachen, Germany, Mies' career began in the influential studio of Peter Behrens, where Mies worked alongside other two other titans of modernism, Walter Gropius and Le Corbusier. For almost a century, Mies' minimalist style has proved very popular; his famous aphorism "less is more" is still widely used, even by those who are unaware of its origins.

Neue National Gallery in Berlin. Image © Guillermo Hevia García The Farnsworth House. Image © Greg Robbins IBM Building. Image © Bluffton University Seagram Building. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:NewYorkSeagram_04.30.2008.JPG'>Wikimedia user Noroton</a> licensed under public domain + 14

6 Schools That Defined Their Own Architectural Styles

07:00 - 20 February, 2019
6 Schools That Defined Their Own Architectural Styles

Architectural education has always been fundamentally influenced by whichever styles are popular at a given time, but that relationship flows in the opposite direction as well. All styles must originate somewhere, after all, and revolutionary schools throughout centuries past have functioned as the influencers and generators of their own architectural movements. These schools, progressive in their times, are often founded by discontented experimental minds, looking for something not previously nor currently offered in architectural output or education. Instead, they forge their own way and bring their students along with them. As those students graduate and continue on to practice or become teachers themselves, the school’s influence spreads and a new movement is born.

Federico Babina's "Archivoids" Depicts the Invisible Masses left by Famous Architects

13:00 - 4 January, 2019
Federico Babina's "Archivoids" Depicts the Invisible Masses left by Famous Architects, © Federico Babina
© Federico Babina

Italian artist Federico Babina has published the latest in his impressive portfolio of architectural illustrations. “Archivoid” seeks to “sculpt invisible masses of space” through the reading of negatives – using the architectural language of famous designers past and present, from Frank Lloyd Wright to Bjarke Ingels.

Babina’s images create an inverse point of view, a reversal of perception for an alternative reading of space, and reality itself. Making negative space his protagonist, Babina traces the “Architectural footprints” of famous architects, coupling mysterious geometries with a vibrant color scheme.

© Federico Babina © Federico Babina © Federico Babina © Federico Babina + 9

Artist Spencer Finch Evokes Kyoto's Ryoan-ji Garden at the Mies Pavilion

05:00 - 3 October, 2018
Artist Spencer Finch Evokes Kyoto's Ryoan-ji Garden at the Mies Pavilion, © Anna Mas
© Anna Mas

It would be hard to associate zen philosophy with Mies van der Rohe, even harder to associate it with the German Pavilion in Barcelona. Nevertheless, the latest work by American artist Spencer Finch, Fifteen stones (Ryōan-ji), precisely establishes that connection with the iconic pavilion.

Spencer Finch was the latest artist invited to intervene the Fundació's pavilion. With the aim of "provok[ing] new looks and reflections through [his] intervention in the Pavilion, [he] enhanced it as a space for inspiration and experimentation for the most innovative artistic and architectural creation." Finch joined a prominent team of artists and architects, including SANAA, Jeff Wall, Ai Wei Wei, Enric Miralles, Andrés Jaque, and Anna & Eugeni Bach, among others.

© Anna Mas © Anna Mas © Anna Mas © Anna Mas + 10

Chicago Architecture Foundation's New Home, the Chicago Architecture Center, to Open in Late August

14:00 - 30 June, 2018
Chicago Architecture Foundation's New Home, the Chicago Architecture Center, to Open in Late August, Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation
Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation

The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) has announced the opening date for their new home, the Chicago Architecture Center (CAC). Set to open August 31 of this year, the CAC will be the "home to everything architecture in Chicago." The 20,000-square-foot structure is located at 111 East Wacker Drive, just above the dock for the River Cruise offered by the CAF.

Lynn Osmond, the CAF's president and CEO, said of the new Center, "We can't wait for people to visit and experience how Chicago architects have influenced the world through their innovation and vision. We've engineered a stimulating and immersive space where visitors can have fun discovering Chicago's groundbreaking architecture and appreciate its profound impact on the world."

Designed by Chicago-based firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG), the CAC will feature custom spaces designed for education, tour orientation, and other public programs, as well as a store and interactive exhibits.

Read on for more about the Chicago Architecture Center and its unique design experience.

Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Foundation + 7

No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

08:00 - 6 June, 2018
No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

In the ambit of architecture, much of the twentieth century is marked by a production that reads, in general, as modern. The foundations of this work have been the subject of discussion for at least six decades, bringing together conflicting opinions about the true intention behind the modern gestalt.

Mies van der Rohe by Edgar Stach

19:00 - 5 February, 2018
Mies van der Rohe by Edgar Stach

It is understood that Mies van der Rohe is one of the most important architects of the Modern movement. But how do Mies’ ideas on architecture and on the logic of construction relate to his built – and sometimes unbuilt – oeuvre? This book investigates this question based on 14 projects, with a focus on the choice of detail and material. Specially produced three-dimensional drawings provide an easy-to-understand analysis of Mies’ construction concepts.

The projects include Lange and Esters Houses (1927–30), Tugendhat House (1928-30), the Barcelona Pavilion (1928-29), Farnsworth House (1946-51), Lake Shore Drive (1948-51) and

8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles

09:30 - 26 January, 2018
8 Architects Whose Names Became Architectural Styles, Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/7455207@N05/5491325900/'>Flickr user SBA73</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Sagrada Familia Ceiling Detail. Image © Flickr user SBA73 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Throughout history, there have been certain architects whose unique ideas and innovative styles have influenced generations to come. Some of these pioneers introduced ideas so revolutionary that entirely new words had to be invented to truly encapsulate them. Whether they became a style embraced by an entire era, or captured the imagination of millions for decades to come, we know a Gaudiesque or Corbusian building when we see one.

Here are eight adjectives derived from the works of architects whose names are now in the dictionary:

Ronchamp by Le Corbusier. Image via <a href='http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Ronchamp-Snow-Chapel-Notre-dame-You-Skin-De-Ronchamp-372579'>Maxpixel</a> Farnsworth House by Mies Van Der Rohe. Image © Jack E. Boucher <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/il0323/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) Fuente de los Amantes by Luis Barragan. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/esparta/3573608700'>Flickr user esparta</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a> Trinity Church, Boston by Henry Hobson Richardson. Image © Carol M. Highsmith <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/highsm.12234/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) + 9

10 Incredible Works of Architecture Photographed in Fall: The Best Photos of the Week

14:00 - 23 November, 2017
Cortesía de VIPP
Cortesía de VIPP

September 22nd marked the start of fall in the Northern Hemisphere. This season of the year is excellent for architectural photography due to the effects of nature, which delights us with wonderful red and orange foliage. To mark the beginning of this season, we have created a selection of 10 works captured in fall by prominent photographers such as Francisco Nogueira, Jorge López Conde, and Steve Montpetit.

Cortesía de Matter Design + FR|SCH © Roger Frei © Roland Halbe Cortesía de Format Elf Architekten + 11

Architectural Adventures: Detroit—Motor City’s Architectural Revival

15:44 - 16 November, 2017
Architectural Adventures: Detroit—Motor City’s Architectural Revival, WSU McGregor Memorial Conference Center | courtesy of Jeff Dunn
WSU McGregor Memorial Conference Center | courtesy of Jeff Dunn

For most of the 20th century, Detroit was our nation’s economic dynamo. This heritage is reflected in the treasure trove of outstanding historic homes, buildings, and factories that still define the cityscape. While Detroit has struggled into the 21st century, its role as a center for architectural innovation is undiminished. With stunning early 20th-century mansions, grand Art Deco skyscrapers, and surprising mid-century masterpieces, the Motor City has more to offer than most realize. Explore the Cranbrook Academy of Art, Lafayette Park, Eastern Market, private homes, and special projects by local preservation organizations. Learn about how Detroit is rebounding while experiencing the innovative and seminal works of great architects like Eliel Saarinen, Daniel Burnham, Cass Gilbert, John Burgee, Albert Kahn, Minoru Yamasaki, and Mies van der Rohe along the way.

Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion “Dematerialized” With All-White Surfaces

12:00 - 10 November, 2017
Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion “Dematerialized” With All-White Surfaces, © Adrià Goula
© Adrià Goula

Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion is being transformed into a “1:1 scale model” of itself in a new exhibition designed by Anna and Eugeni Bach titled “mies missing materiality.”

Over the next week, the iconic structure – the longest standing temporary pavilion in modern architectural history – will be completely covered with white vinyl, obscuring the beautiful marble, travertine, steel, chrome, and glass for which it is recognized.

The project sets to prompt discussion about the role of material in the original design, as well as the symbolism of the white surface within modern architecture.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula + 6

In "Horizontal City," 24 Architects Reconsider Architectural Interiors at 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

10:20 - 25 September, 2017

Horizontal City is one of two collective exhibitions (the other being Vertical City) at the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial. 24 architects were tasked by artistic directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee to "reconsider the status of the architectural interior" by referencing a photograph of a canonical interior from any time period.

Their challenge was in considering the forms and ways that their selection "might extrapolate out from the cropped photographic frame into a spatial and lifestyle construction across a larger, horizontal site" – in this case, a field of plinths, the size and positioning of which is a direct reference to the footprint of Mies van der Rohe's 1947 plan for the IIT Campus in Chicago.

How an Artist Constructed a Wooden Replica of Mies' Farnsworth House

09:30 - 31 August, 2017
How an Artist Constructed a Wooden Replica of Mies' Farnsworth House, © Pedro Marinello
© Pedro Marinello

In December 2010, Manuel Peralta Lorca completed the work "Welcome Less Is More," a wooden reconstruction of Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House that was installed inside the Patricia Ready Gallery in Santiago, Chile. This September, a new version of this work will be mounted in the hall of Santiago's Museum of Contemporary Art, under the name "Home Less is More."

In the following story, the artist tells us about the process of reinterpreting this icon of modern architecture in wood and how a team of carpenters—who agreed to immerse themselves in the philosophy of Mies—was fundamental to completing the challenge.