1. ArchDaily
  2. Furniture

Furniture: The Latest Architecture and News

Is the Future of Furniture Flat-packed?

Design for assembly (DFA) is hardly new. Thonet’s 1859 No. 14 chair, when disassembled, could be shipped in batches of 36 per 40-square-inch box.

Those cost savings tied to DFA are still valuable. And as it helped revolutionize shipping in the industrial era, it now carries prestige as a powerful carbon-reduction tool. In fact, DFA is currently the distinguishing feature of at least six highly visible product launches among commercial furniture manufacturers in just the past year.

Is the Future of Furniture Flat-packed? - Image 1 of 4Is the Future of Furniture Flat-packed? - Image 2 of 4Is the Future of Furniture Flat-packed? - Image 3 of 4Is the Future of Furniture Flat-packed? - Image 4 of 4Is the Future of Furniture Flat-packed? - More Images+ 1

Constructing With Concrete: Hardcore Projects and Products

Widely recognized as being responsible for 8% of global CO2 emissions, concrete should be a blacklisted material, relegated to the shameful annals of architectural history. Rapid global urbanization, however, will ensure its unequaled production simplicity and structural strength help retain concrete’s firm grip on the construction industry.

If you can’t beat it, improve it: is the industry’s mantra on innovation, currently developing various alternatives to concrete or its constituent parts and admixtures. So with a concrete set for the environmental green list, the concrete revolution –using the material as an aesthetic exterior facade, interior decoration and fittings, or even in furniture and lighting, as well as a structural framework– is free to continue.

How to Choose Children’s Bedroom Furniture

In the majority of family homes, it’s common for children to be given the smallest rooms. They are, after all, the smallest people. But where grown-ups have the rest of the house to fill with their accrued material wealth, children’s only freedom to decide what they do and where things go, is in that one small room.

Learning about the world can be frustrating, and quickly lead to misdiagnosed ‘bad’ behavior. So creating a safe, welcoming, comfortable space where children can feel calm, loved, and protected while enjoying their independence and individuality, is essential for a happy, healthy childhood. Children’s bedroom design, therefore, has more in common with open-plan living than simple sleeping quarters.

Spaces of Transition that Improve Quality of Life in Interiors

 | Sponsored Content

Although things seem to have returned to normal, it is undeniable that the COVID-19 pandemic has changed everyone. The truth is, its impacts on the economy and society can still be felt and will remain for some time. As a consequence, most people have become more conscious about public health, disease dissemination and the importance of science in everyday life. Many began to place more importance on time spent with family and at home, while companies have realized that not all office spaces are really essential and that home office can be just as effective.

The result is that people have began modifying their spaces to accommodate new uses which might have been unthinkable before. Our homes had to become, in a few weeks, places for rest, work, study, sports and leisure. Most were not prepared for this change, but gradually both residents and architects and designers found ways to adapt to the new reality. We've learned that accommodating new functions into a home means more than just setting up a table in the only free corner of the apartment. The pandemic also accelerated certain global trends and changed our relationships with products, companies and services, in terms of sustainability, social justice, digitization and individualization. The common factor between these different elements is that now they no longer require you to make a choice between one thing or another. Instead, all these elements are now connected, making life, people and products more agile and long-lasting. Under the motto “Create Transitions”, EGGER shows how decors and wood-based products can create and shape change in everyday living.

Cooktop, Gas or Electric Stove: Which One Is Best for Your Kitchen?

In many cultures, the kitchen has become not only a workspace, but also a meeting place, a social environment where family and friends gather for conversation and meals. Seeking to respond to this transformation from more integrated architectural plans and appliances that also have an aesthetic appeal, as well as practical, the choice of kitchen equipment, such as the stove, is no longer restricted to its technical conditions. Check out how to combine practical, technical and aesthetic aspects when choosing a stove.

Cooktop, Gas or Electric Stove: Which One Is Best for Your Kitchen? - Image 1 of 4Cooktop, Gas or Electric Stove: Which One Is Best for Your Kitchen? - Image 2 of 4Cooktop, Gas or Electric Stove: Which One Is Best for Your Kitchen? - Image 3 of 4Cooktop, Gas or Electric Stove: Which One Is Best for Your Kitchen? - Image 4 of 4Cooktop, Gas or Electric Stove: Which One Is Best for Your Kitchen? - More Images+ 1

What Will the Furniture of the Future Be Made From?

In the architectural conversations we are having in today’s world, conversations on materials are widespread. There is discussion on the viability of concrete in the contemporary context, how timber can be more sustainably sourced, and on how biodegradable materials such as bamboo should be more common sights in our urban environments.

But we also need to be talking about what goes into these buildings – that is, the furniture that decorates, enhances, and makes habitable the buildings around us. The materials used to craft these objects have constantly evolved over centuries, and as we approach the end of 2022, it’s worth asking – what does the future hold for what our furniture will be made from?

What Will the Furniture of the Future Be Made From? - Image 1 of 4What Will the Furniture of the Future Be Made From? - Image 2 of 4What Will the Furniture of the Future Be Made From? - Image 3 of 4What Will the Furniture of the Future Be Made From? - Image 4 of 4What Will the Furniture of the Future Be Made From? - More Images+ 7

AkzoNobel selects "Wild Wonder" as the Color of the Year 2023, Inspired by Nature and Harvested Crops

Inspired by the warm tones of harvested crops, Wild Wonder was selected as Color of the Year 2023 by AkzoNobel. Extensive research conducted by AkzoNobel, including color experts and international design professionals, identified the "Wonders of the Natural" swatch at the heart of global social and design. This trend is inspired by nature as people are re-evaluating their relationship with the environment as the source of everything in their lives. # d0c599, or pale yellow/ olive green, captures the moment's mood and conveys serenity and positivity after these recent years of uncertainty and despair.

AkzoNobel selects "Wild Wonder" as the Color of the Year 2023, Inspired by Nature and Harvested Crops - Image 1 of 4AkzoNobel selects "Wild Wonder" as the Color of the Year 2023, Inspired by Nature and Harvested Crops - Image 2 of 4AkzoNobel selects "Wild Wonder" as the Color of the Year 2023, Inspired by Nature and Harvested Crops - Image 3 of 4AkzoNobel selects "Wild Wonder" as the Color of the Year 2023, Inspired by Nature and Harvested Crops - Image 4 of 4AkzoNobel selects Wild Wonder as the Color of the Year 2023, Inspired by Nature and Harvested Crops - More Images+ 14

Global Design Agenda: Furniture Design Week

'Furniture is how we tame a space.' So says go-to interior designer India Mahdavi. Find out what she, along with Pearson Lloyd, Doshi Levien and Patrick Norguet, have to say about the relation between products and space, as well as the rapidly shifting leading design But how strong is our resolve when it comes to a consistent and meaningful approach to sustainability in architecture and design?

Designing Illuminated, Natural and Minimal Interiors

 | Sponsored Content

Architects are constantly diving into design strategies that aim to select the best products to create outstanding atmospheres inside their projects. The solutions adopted in projects, especially in interiors, are highly influenced by trends that mirror what society values most at the time. But how are interiors being designed nowadays? With a focus on natural interiors and the interaction with their context, architecture is prioritizing local materials and textures, natural light and the use of minimal furniture that allows continuity throughout space.

Below we present a selection of inspiring projects that, using products from Spanish brands, showcase these modern trends, from the use of natural materials to maximizing natural light.

Design Trends: The New Remodelling of Homes in Barcelona

Nowadays, the integral reform of flats in Barcelona is one of the most common activities for both freelance architects and local architectural studios. This is not surprising in a city with more than 4,000 years of history in which there is a lot of buildings and little room for new construction.

Timeless Design Icons: How to Style your Home Sustainably

Sustainability is on everyone's lips these days – but mostly with a view to the future and the question of how it is possible to use fewer resources, produce more sustainably and reduce waste. However, sustainability can also be lived with a view to the past or the present – namely with a domestic environment that consists of durable furniture designs that outlast trends and never go out of fashion. In the third part of our series on design icons, we put Philippe Starck, Eero Saarinen, Achille Castiglioni, Patricia Urquiola and Max Bill in the spotlight with their evergreen furniture icons, which can be found on architonic.com.

Libertarian and Anti-functionalist: What Is the Memphis Design Movement?

Far from the US state of Tennessee, the Memphis movement emerged in Milan in the 1980s and revolutionized design. Its gaudy colors, exaggerated patterns and conflicting prints were intended to overturn the minimalism status quo of the time, also contradicting the functionalist design postulated by the Bauhaus with its purely aesthetic and ornamental forms.

Libertarian and Anti-functionalist: What Is the Memphis Design Movement? - Image 1 of 4Libertarian and Anti-functionalist: What Is the Memphis Design Movement? - Image 2 of 4Libertarian and Anti-functionalist: What Is the Memphis Design Movement? - Image 3 of 4Libertarian and Anti-functionalist: What Is the Memphis Design Movement? - Image 4 of 4Libertarian and Anti-functionalist: What Is the Memphis Design Movement? - More Images+ 5

Spirits in the Material World: A Trip to the Eames Institute

Metropolis Magazine's Kenneth Caldwell visits the Eames Ranch in Petaluma, California to unpack the goals and secrets of the Eames Institute of Infinite Curiosity. He explains that he may not be the best person to write objectively about the recent public launch of the Eames Institute of Infinite Curiosity, a non-profit formed in 2019 to help us explore Charles and Ray Eames’ legacy; particularly their timeless, iterative design process; the chair he sits in every day was designed by the Eameses the year he was born, and their work has been part of his life since he was a young boy looking for the future in architecture magazines at the local public library.

Spirits in the Material World: A Trip to the Eames Institute - Featured ImageSpirits in the Material World: A Trip to the Eames Institute - Image 1 of 4Spirits in the Material World: A Trip to the Eames Institute - Image 2 of 4Spirits in the Material World: A Trip to the Eames Institute - Image 3 of 4Spirits in the Material World: A Trip to the Eames Institute - More Images

Tradition, Reconnection, and Nature: Trends and Themes of the 60th Edition of the Salone del Mobile.Milano

From the 7th until the 12th of June, the streets of Milan were overflowing with thousands of national and international architects, designers, manufacturers, artists, and craftsmen for its annual Design Week, exploring new design innovations, and exchanging ideas about interior design, furniture, and lighting. Much like every year, the Salone del Mobile, which takes place at the Fiera Milano | Rho, serves as "a laboratory for experimentation and a place for new opportunities for reflection on the world of design and designing". But with attendance of over 262,000 visitors in six days, along with over 3,500 accredited journalists from around the world, this year's event surpassed all expectations in terms of turnout, confirming that the exhibition is still a prominent influence on the architecture and design industry.

Tradition, Reconnection, and Nature: Trends and Themes of the 60th Edition of the Salone del Mobile.Milano - Image 1 of 4Tradition, Reconnection, and Nature: Trends and Themes of the 60th Edition of the Salone del Mobile.Milano - Image 2 of 4Tradition, Reconnection, and Nature: Trends and Themes of the 60th Edition of the Salone del Mobile.Milano - Image 3 of 4Tradition, Reconnection, and Nature: Trends and Themes of the 60th Edition of the Salone del Mobile.Milano - Image 4 of 4Tradition, Reconnection, and Nature: Trends and Themes of the 60th Edition of the Salone del Mobile.Milano - More Images+ 12