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Diebedo Francis Kere

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

09:30 - 18 October, 2018
Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions, Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes + 20

Francis Kéré: "I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground"

08:00 - 27 September, 2018
Francis Kéré: "I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground", © Eduardo Souza
© Eduardo Souza

This phrase caught my eye during Diébédo Francis Kéré's speech at the AAICO (Architecture and Art International Congress), which took place in Porto, Portugal from September 3 to 8. After being introduced by none other than Eduardo Souto de Moura, Kéré began his speech with the simplicity and humility that guides his work. His best-known works were built in remote places, where materials are scarce and the workforce is of the residents themselves, using local resources and techniques.

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

14:00 - 11 June, 2018
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public.

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan + 38

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Announces Recipients of 2018 Honorary Fellowships

14:00 - 3 February, 2018
The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Announces Recipients of 2018 Honorary Fellowships, Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) has selected four architects from around the globe to receive 2018 Honorary Fellowships. This year’s Honorary Fellows inductees demonstrate the diverse ways in which architects contribute exemplary designs to the profession that have a positive impact on society.

The architects receiving the honor are French architect Odile Decq, Burkina Faso native, Diébédo Francis Kéré, and American architects William J. Stanley III and John Sorrenti.

More about the Honorary Fellows after the break.

Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Pavilion To be Moved to Permanent Home in Malaysia

14:00 - 18 December, 2017
Francis Kéré’s  2017 Serpentine Pavilion To be Moved to Permanent Home in Malaysia, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

A month after its critically-lauded run came to a close, Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion has found a permanent home halfway across the globe.

As reported by the Star, the structure has been purchased by Kuala Lumpur-based Ilham Gallery, who are now searching for a permanent site of the pavilion in Malaysia.

Rafael Viñoly, Charles Jencks, and Kim Cook Among Lead Speakers for WAF 2017

06:00 - 26 September, 2017
Rafael Viñoly, Charles Jencks, and Kim Cook Among Lead Speakers for WAF 2017, Courtesy of World Architecture Festival
Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

The World Architecture Festival (WAF) has announced their program for the 2017 edition focusing on the theme of “Performance.” An incredible list of speakers including Alison Brooks, Charles Jencks, Pierre de Meuron and France Kéré will feature across 3 days from November 15th to 17th at the Arena Berlin, Germany. Conferences, city tours, lectures and critiques of the shortlisted projects from the 2017 WAF awards are among the events scheduled for the festival.

The seminars, speeches, debates and discussions will examine “the topic of performance from the perspectives of housing, public spaces, festivals, cultural institutions and new technologies.”

In "Vertical City," 16 Contemporary Architects Reinterpret the Tribune Tower at 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

19:55 - 14 September, 2017
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

In a large-scale, central installation at the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, the likes of 6a architects, Barozzi Veiga, Kéré Architecture, MOS, OFFICE KGDVS, and Sergison Bates—among others—have designed and constructed sixteen five meter-tall contemporary iterations of the renowned 1922 Chicago Tribune Tower design contest.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 56

Diébedo Francis Kéré Awarded Prince Claus Laureate Award for 2017

06:00 - 11 September, 2017
Diébedo Francis Kéré Awarded Prince Claus Laureate Award for 2017, Primary School in Gando. Image © Erik Jan Owerkerk
Primary School in Gando. Image © Erik Jan Owerkerk

Architect Diébedo Francis Kéré was named Prince Claus Laureate for 2017, highlighting the cultural value and importance of beautiful, sustainable and empowering architecture.

Kéré received the award for his “design and construction of buildings of great beauty that meet people’s needs; …for honoring people’s pride in their cultural traditions and techniques, …for inventively combining relevant factors from two different knowledge systems to achieve practical solutions of global relevance and creating an exchange of ideas between Africa and Europe; …and for his ethical commitment to creating inspiring architecture that improves living conditions and uplifts communities...”

The Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Primary School in Gando. Image © Siméon Duchoud Tim Tiebout. Image Courtesy of PMA Courtesy of Kéré Architecture + 9

Diébédo Francis Kéré's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

12:00 - 23 June, 2017
Diébédo Francis Kéré's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Following the opening of the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, designed this year by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to London. Designed to mimic a tree, or a canopy of trees, the wooden structure has been designed to fuse cultural references from Kéré's home town of Gando in Burkino Faso with more "experimental" construction techniques. His ambition is that the pavilion becomes a social condenser – "a symbol of storytelling and togetherness."

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 41

Diébédo Francis Kéré's Serpentine Pavilion Opens in Sun-Drenched London – But Will Come Alive During Rain

10:30 - 20 June, 2017
Diébédo Francis Kéré's Serpentine Pavilion Opens in Sun-Drenched London – But Will Come Alive During Rain, Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan

The 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), was unveiled today in London. Conceived as a micro cosmos—"a community structure within Kensington Gardens"—the pavilion has been designed to consciously fuse cultural references from Kéré's home town of Gando in Burkino Faso, with "experimental construction techniques." The architect hopes that the pavilion, as a social condenser, "will become a beacon of light, a symbol of storytelling and togetherness."

Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan + 4

Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion

07:30 - 21 February, 2017
Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture
Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture

The Serpentine Galleries have announced that the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), an African architect based between Berlin, Germany, and his home town of Gando in Burkino Faso. The design for the proposal, which will be built this summer in London's Kensington Gardens, comprises an expansive roof supported by a steel frame, mimicking the canopy of a tree. According to Kéré, the design for the roof stems from a tree that serves as the central meeting point for life in Gando. In line with the criteria for the selection of the Serpentine Pavilion architect Kéré has yet to have realised a permanent building in England.

Francis Kéré Creates Installation from Brightly Colored Thread for First U.S. Retrospective

16:15 - 1 July, 2016
Francis Kéré Creates Installation from Brightly Colored Thread for First U.S. Retrospective, © Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA
© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

Currently on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Modern Art, Award-winning African architect Diébédo Francis Kéré has created Colorscape, a installation made from steel and brightly-colored fiber, to accompany his first solo show in the United States. The exhibition is titled The Architecture of Francis Kéré: Building with Community, and features of a retrospective of the architect’s career that includes material artifacts, tools and scale-models created for stand-out projects in both Africa and Europe.

© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA © Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA © Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA © Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA + 23

Video: 7 Architects On What Makes Global Architecture Work

15:00 - 21 January, 2016

Doing architecture is listening. - Norman Foster

Peter Zumthor, Jean Nouvel, Norman Foster, Diébédo Francis Kéré and three other great architects come together in this Louisiana Channel video to share their thoughts on how to design for different cultures. For most of them, understanding context, collaborating with locals and using architecture to address larger social issues are what makes global architecture a success.

Louis Becker, Kjetil Trædal Thorsen and Kunlé Adeyemi also share their insights in the video above - "Bridging Cultures in a Global World."

AD Interviews: Francis Kéré / Chicago Architecture Biennial

16:00 - 26 November, 2015

Kéré Architecture’s “Place for Gathering” exhibition at the Chicago Architecture Biennial creates a meeting place at the entrance to the Chicago Cultural Center. Made from a locally sourced material (wood), the exhibition emits a fresh, natural smell, and creates a place for people to meet, connect and share “differing cultural narratives, traditions and aspirations," writes Kéré in the official Chicago Biennale Guidebook.

Selected by ArchDaily Editors as one of their favorite exhibitions at the Biennial, “Place for Gathering” is based on two themes that are central to the work of Francis Kéré: “maximizing local resources and facilitating the exchange of ideas and knowledge." Listen to Kéré explain the inspiration and philosophy behind the exhibition in the video above.

5 Projects at the Chicago Biennial that Demonstrate the State of the Art of Sustainability

09:30 - 13 November, 2015
5 Projects at the Chicago Biennial that Demonstrate the State of the Art of Sustainability

At the Chicago Architecture Biennial, the theme selected by directors Joseph Grima and Sarah Herda was deliberately wide in scope, with the expectation that more than one hundred exhibitors would each bring their own perspective on what is “The State of the Art of Architecture.” But where does that leave one of architecture's most widely adopted missions of the 21st century: sustainability? In this article, originally published on her blog Architectstasy as “Chicago Architecture Biennial: The State of the Art of Sustainability,” Jessica A S Letaw delves into five projects that take on sustainability in the context of Chicago's biennial.

At North America's inaugural Architecture Biennial in Chicago, “The State of the Art of Architecture,” architectural firms and practices from all six inhabited continents have been invited to display their work. Spanning all sizes and kinds of projects, the Biennial is showcasing solutions to design problems from spiderwebs to social housing.

US buildings use around 40% of all the country’s energy consumption. It is a disconcerting truth that even if every new building starting construction tomorrow were to be net-zero energy and net-zero water, we’d still be on a crash course, draining more naturally-available resources than our one planet can permanently sustain. In this environment, architectural designers have a special responsibility to educate themselves about innovative sustainable design techniques, from those that have worked for thousands of years to those that, as the Biennial’s title hopefully suggests, are state of the art.

So what does the Biennial have to say about sustainability? Five projects on display demonstrate different approaches at five different scales: materials, buildings, resources, cities, and the globe.

Diébédo Francis Kéré: "Architecture is About People"

12:18 - 26 August, 2015

On the Louisiana Channel's latest installment, Burkinabé architect Diébédo Francis Kéré discusses his "Canopy" installation, currently on view at the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, and shares thoughts on the impact of architecture. Designed with a sense of freedom that encourages users to interact with the installation as they wish, Kere's Canopy serves as a flexible gathering space within the museum that is reminiscent of "AFRICA."

“They’re free to use the space like they behave, like they feel," says Kere. "Architecture is about people."

Exhibition: AFRICA at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

19:30 - 25 June, 2015
Exhibition: AFRICA at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Kéré Architecture (Burkina Faso): Gando Secondary School, 2013 Foto: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk
Kéré Architecture (Burkina Faso): Gando Secondary School, 2013 Foto: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

The exhibition AFRICA is the third and last in the series architecture, culture and identity. It focuses on the area called sub-Saharan Africa – the part of Africa south of the Sahara Desert. Louisiana’s wish to mount this exhibition has its origin in a very simple observation: despite the fact that Africa is the world’s second-largest continent, surprisingly little contemporary culture from there comes our way.

7 Architects Designing a Diverse Future in Africa

10:30 - 26 February, 2015

As the legacy of the Cold War fades and Western preeminence gradually becomes a thing of the past, population booms in Asia followed by the growth of a vast non-western middle class have seriously challenged the Western perception of the world. The East has become the focal point of the world’s development.

If East Asia is the present focal point of this development, the future indisputably lies in Africa. Long featuring in the Western consciousness only as a land of unending suffering, it is now a place of rapidly falling poverty, increasing investment, and young populations. It seems only fair that Africa’s rich cultures and growing population (predicted to reach 1.4 billion by 2025) finally take the stage, but it’s crucially important that Africa’s future development is done right. Subject to colonialism for centuries, development in the past was characterized by systems that were designed for the benefit of the colonists. Even recently, resource and energy heavy concrete buildings, clothes donations that damage native textile industries, and reforestation programs that plant water hungry and overly flammable trees have all been seen, leaving NGOs open to accusations of well-meaning ignorance.

Fortunately, a growth in native practices and a more sensible, sensitive approach from foreign organizations has led to the rise of architectural groups creating buildings which learn from and improve Africa. Combining local solutions with the most appropriate Western ideas, for the first time these new developments break down the perception of monolithic Africa and have begun engaging with individual cultures; using elements of non-local architecture when they improve a development rather than creating a pastiche of an imagined pan-African culture. The visions these groups articulate are by no means the same - sustainable rural development, high end luxury residences and dignified civic constructions all feature - but they have in common their argument for a bright future across Africa. We’ve collected seven pioneers of Africa’s architectural awakening - read on after the break for the full article and infographic.

Pretoria's Freedom Park, designed by MMA Design Studio with GAPP Architects and MRA Architects. Image Courtesy of MMA Design Studio, GAPP Architects and MRA Architects The Makoko Floating School in Lagos, Nigeria. Image © NLÉ Architects Butaro Hospital in Rwanda. Image © Iwan Baan Red Pepper House in Lamu, Kenya. Image © Alberto Heras + 29