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Jennifer Whelan

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Architect to Buy/Re-Purpose Rudolph's Orange County Government Center

00:00 - 14 July, 2014
Architect to Buy/Re-Purpose Rudolph's Orange County Government Center, The Brutalist-style Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., closed since 2011, and designed by Paul Rudolph, may get a shot at preservation. Image © Randy Harris
The Brutalist-style Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., closed since 2011, and designed by Paul Rudolph, may get a shot at preservation. Image © Randy Harris

Some people hate Paul Rudolph's Orange County Government Center in Goshen, New York, while others love it. Despite the Brutalist building's eligibility for landmark status, its current fate is up in the air. Gene Kaufman, a partner at Gwathmey Siegal Kaufman Architects, has offered to buy and repurpose the building. To learn about his proposal, head to the New York Times to by clicking here.

Why We Can Thank Gehry, Graves, and Scott Brown for Julia Morgan's AIA Gold Medal Win

00:00 - 13 July, 2014
Why We Can Thank Gehry, Graves, and Scott Brown for Julia Morgan's AIA Gold Medal Win,  Julia Morgan is the eighth posthumous winner of the Gold Medal, which has been issued since 1907. Image Courtesy of The Chronicle
Julia Morgan is the eighth posthumous winner of the Gold Medal, which has been issued since 1907. Image Courtesy of The Chronicle

Considering Julia Morgan was overlooked for over 100 years and has been dead for over 50, naysayers may consider her recent accolade as the first woman to receive the AIA Gold Medal something of an empty gesture. However, the prestigious group of supporters who compiled her nomination package - among them Michael Graves, Frank Gehry, and Denise Scott Brown - would beg to differ. To find out how and why the trio championed Morgan's case, check out this article on SFGate.

Retirement Community Is Fastest Growing Metropolitan Area in U.S.

00:00 - 13 July, 2014
Retirement Community Is Fastest Growing Metropolitan Area in U.S. , The sun sets over a golf course in The Villages. Image © Scott Kublin via Flickr
The sun sets over a golf course in The Villages. Image © Scott Kublin via Flickr

While other cities in the United States are shrinking, the world's largest retirement community - The Villages - is booming. Completely devoid of crime, traffic, pollution, as well as children, the fastest growing metropolitan area in the country raises serious questions about the concentrated demographic's future infrastructural needs. After all, by 2050, the over-60 set is expected to almost triple to 2 billion. To learn more, check out this fascinating article on Bloomberg.

Tree-Like Skyscraper Takes Urban Farming to Next Level

00:00 - 13 July, 2014
Tree-Like Skyscraper Takes Urban Farming to Next Level, Courtesy of Aprilli Design Studio
Courtesy of Aprilli Design Studio

Urban farming is nothing new, but Aprilli Design Studio's proposal for a completely open-air skyscraper does put a novel spin on the sustainable ideal. Instead of tacking greenery onto roofs and balconies, they incorporate agriculture into cities by dedicating entire buildings to the cause. To learn more about the tree-like design, check out Fast Company's article here.

New Study Discredits Bilbao Effect

00:00 - 11 July, 2014
New Study Discredits Bilbao Effect, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti proudly displays his pro-Lucas Twitter hastag. Image Courtesy of City of Los Angeles
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti proudly displays his pro-Lucas Twitter hastag. Image Courtesy of City of Los Angeles

Before George Lucas found a home for his museum in Chicago, the mayors of other cities were desperately vying for the honor (see Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti above). If they are still disappointed about losing out, a new study about the aftermath of building cultural centers might offer some consolation. To learn about the planning fallacies and negative outcomes often associated with these building types, check out CityLab's recap.

Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings Under Consideration as UNESCO Heritage Site

00:00 - 10 July, 2014
Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings Under Consideration as UNESCO Heritage Site, © http://www.flickr.com/photos/32224170@N03/3352894744/. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
© http://www.flickr.com/photos/32224170@N03/3352894744/. Used under Creative Commons

By 2016, Frank Lloyd Wright's finest creations may be considered as monumental as the Taj Mahal or the Great Pyramids. The eleven structures, including the Robie House and the Guggenheim Museum, have been collectively nominated as a single UNESCO World Heritage Site. To learn a bit more about the nomination process and why they are being considered, check out this article on the Wisconsin Rapids Tribute.

Amsterdam's Glass Music Hall Faces Demolition, Seeks Home

00:00 - 9 July, 2014
Courtesy of Octatube
Courtesy of Octatube

A mere twenty-five years after its inauguration, the Glass Music Hall at the former Exchange of Berlage in Amsterdam is looking for a new home, where it will be relocated and reassembled for free. The innovative space, originally designed for the Dutch Chamber Music Orchestra, has garnered international attention and multiple awards, but sadly no longer meets the needs of the facility.

Designed by architect Pieter Zaanen and structural designer Mick Eekhout, the Glass Music Hall sits in the center of an existing space, defying stereotypes about what glass can do. Being a hard material, the reverberation time in a blunt glass hall would be approximately 5 seconds. However, this number was brought down to 1 or 2 seconds in this instance, proving glass can be used to create a fantastical acoustical environment.

Can Architecture Make Abortion Clinics Safer?

00:00 - 7 July, 2014
Can Architecture Make Abortion Clinics Safer?, A sign delineates the buffer zone outside of a Planned Parenthood in Burlington, Vermont. Image © afagen via Flickr
A sign delineates the buffer zone outside of a Planned Parenthood in Burlington, Vermont. Image © afagen via Flickr

Unable to afford architectural services, many abortion clinics in the US constantly struggle to create a buffer between themselves and the often radical anti-abortion protesters outside their walls (indeed, physical barriers - such as sprinkler systems - are often the only things that make clinic workers and their patients feel safe). To learn more about how architecture can help protect them, head over to Fast CoDesign for their fascinating article.

Video: The Spatial Diagramming of Spike Jonze's "Her"

00:00 - 6 July, 2014

Every month, INTERIORS Journal analyzes and diagrams the spaces in various films, producing detailed plans for our viewing pleasure. But have you ever wondered just how they do it? If you have, check out their short video on making the plan from Spike Jonze's feature film Her above.

Artist Lucy William's Remarkable Illustrations of 20th Century Modernism

00:00 - 5 July, 2014
Artist Lucy William's Remarkable Illustrations of 20th Century Modernism, Great Arthur House, 2014. Plexiglas, paper, cork, corrugated polystyrene, balsa wood, birch and walnut veneers, bronze colored card and acrylic paint on board. Image Courtesy of McKee Gallery
Great Arthur House, 2014. Plexiglas, paper, cork, corrugated polystyrene, balsa wood, birch and walnut veneers, bronze colored card and acrylic paint on board. Image Courtesy of McKee Gallery

Neither photographs nor renders, all of the images in this post are actually the intricately handcrafted creations of British artist Lucy Williams, a skilled paper-cutter with an incredible amount of patience. Luckily for us architecture fiends, the stars of Williams’ mixed-media works are her 20th century modernist designs. Check out more of her amazing work after the break.

Bricket Wood, 2013. Plexiglas, cork, balsa wood, paper, card, walnut veneer, silver colored card and acrylic paint on board. Image Courtesy of McKee Gallery Bousfield School, 2013. Paper, card, Plexiglas, cork, gravel effect scenic mat, silver colored card and acrylic paint on board. Image Courtesy of McKee Gallery 66 Frognal, 2014. Miniature red house bricks, Plexiglas, paper, card, cork, balsa wood, piano wire, scenic polyester voile, grass effect scenic mat, silver colored card and acrylic paint on board. Image Courtesy of McKee Gallery Howard House, 2014. Plexiglas, paper, cork, obeche strip wood and acrylic paint on board. Image Courtesy of McKee Gallery + 5

Sarah Sze's 2013 U.S. Venice Biennale Installation Coming Home

00:00 - 5 July, 2014
Sarah Sze's 2013 U.S. Venice Biennale Installation Coming Home, Wood, steel, plastic, stone, string, fans, overhead projectors, photograph of rock printed on Tyvek, mixed media at Triple Point (Planetarium), 2013. Image courtesy of Sarah Sze, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and Victoria Miro Gallery, London. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging
Wood, steel, plastic, stone, string, fans, overhead projectors, photograph of rock printed on Tyvek, mixed media at Triple Point (Planetarium), 2013. Image courtesy of Sarah Sze, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and Victoria Miro Gallery, London. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging

Is that rock inside or outside? Wait, is it even a rock? If not, then what is it? As bizarre as these questions may seem, they are the exact ones Sarah Sze wanted people to ask themselves when visiting her Triple Point (Planetarium) exhibit in the United States Pavilion at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Sze, whose work tends to distort the viewer's perception of reality, "transformed the U.S. Pavilion into a chain of immersive experiences through a series of interrelated installations."

Although the project was specifically designed to engage the Neoclassical Pavilion, part of it will be on display at the Bronx Museum of the Arts from July 3rd through August 24th of this year. For more on the artist and the exhibit, keep reading after the break.

Mexico's 2014 Public Interest Design Award Winners

00:00 - 3 July, 2014
Mexico's 2014 Public Interest Design Award Winners, Participatory design and community construction of a microregional center for technological innovation. Image Courtesy of PID Mexico
Participatory design and community construction of a microregional center for technological innovation. Image Courtesy of PID Mexico

Effective, excellent, inclusive, impactful, systematic, and participatory - these were the six criteria jurors considered when selecting the winners of this year's Public Interest Design Mexico Awards. On September 11th and 12th in Mexico City, the six winning projects will be presented to the public. To learn more about these exemplary projects that serve the public realm, keep reading after the break.

Crowdfunding: Transformed Truck To Take Art & Architecture on the Road

00:00 - 2 July, 2014

"What better way to spread the gospel of design than to liberate it from its brick-and-mortar foundations and take it on the road?" This is the idea behind Circus for Construction - a competition-winning proposal to transform a semi-truck into a traveling exhibition space for art and architecture. If the project reaches its Kickstarter fundraising goal, it will be visiting Provincetown, Providence, Ithaca, Buffalo, Portland, and Boston this coming fall.

Washington D.C. - The Most Walkable City in the US?

00:00 - 29 June, 2014
Chicago is the fifth most walkable city. Image © Vincent Desjardins via Flickr
Chicago is the fifth most walkable city. Image © Vincent Desjardins via Flickr

A new report from Christopher Leinberger and Patrick Lynch at The George Washington University School of Business has unexpectedly named Washington D.C. the most walkable city in the U.S., trumping expected favorites like New York, which ranked second.

Respectively rounding out the top five were Boston, San Francisco, and Chicago. Although a mere 2.8 percent of the population is estimated to walk to work, the report's authors believe the results are indicative of urban development moving away from automobile dependency and sprawl - an event they consider as significant as Frederick Jackson Turner declaring the "closing of the frontier" in 1893.

India’s Most Successful Architect: Improving India's Slums or Exacerbating Social Gaps?

00:00 - 29 June, 2014
India’s Most Successful Architect: Improving India's Slums or Exacerbating Social Gaps?, On what used to be a shantytown, Hafeez Contractor's the Imperial Towers now loom over low-income apartments. Image © Mahesh Shantaram for The New York Times
On what used to be a shantytown, Hafeez Contractor's the Imperial Towers now loom over low-income apartments. Image © Mahesh Shantaram for The New York Times

"The Indian poor live in perpetual darkness, while the Indian rich live in perpetual light." This fact is obviously embedded in Mumbai, where luxury condominiums rise in the middle of slums. Many of these extravagant buildings were designed by India's most commercially successful architect, Hafeez Contractor, who believes his arrestive work is the beginning of slum redevelopment. Learn about his crusade and how he's been criticized in this New York Times article by Daniel Brook.

Students and Community Members Come Together to Construct Theater in Cape Town Township

00:00 - 28 June, 2014
Students and Community Members Come Together to Construct Theater in Cape Town Township, Courtesy of Future Cape Town
Courtesy of Future Cape Town

The Guga S’Thebe Arts and Cultural Centre in Langa, Cape Town's oldest township, is expanding to include a theatre exclusively for children and adolescents. The main component of the theatre, set for completion this fall, will be a large, multi-functional space for hosting performances. The project, a collaborative effort between future users and international architecture students, is aimed at stimulating sustainable development while widening the possibilities for the target demographic. To check out more project images, continue after the break.

David Rockwell's Luxurious Pre-Fab Homes

00:00 - 28 June, 2014
David Rockwell's Luxurious Pre-Fab Homes, © Rockwell Group
© Rockwell Group

Two weeks ago, David Rockwell took a step away from his usual work of interior and set design to present his foray into the prefab game - an adaptable 2,400 square-foot house called "Pinwheel." His design aims to challenge two assumptions about prefabrication: one, affordability and luxury are mutually exclusive and two, pre-fab's limited flexibility makes a cookie-cutter result inevitable. Rockwell says the project, a collaboration between himself and Fred Carl, founder of modular housing venture C3 Design, was inspired by his childhood in Mexico, where "outdoor space was part of the lifestyle." Check out the plan and more designs after the break.

In Images: South Africa's Stunning Treetop Walkway

00:00 - 28 June, 2014
In Images: South Africa's Stunning Treetop Walkway , © Adam Harrower
© Adam Harrower

The much anticipated Treetop Walkway through the Arboretum in Cape Town's Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden is now open to the public. Located 11 metres above the ground, the galvanised steel and timber structure offers breathtaking views from the treetops. The project, a collaboration between Mark Thomas Architects and Henry Fagan & Partners consulting engineers, has been nicknamed Boomslang - a large, highly venomous African tree snake - due to its elevated, twisting form. Check out the stunning photographs by Adam Harrower, a horticulturist at the garden, after the break.

© Adam Harrower © Adam Harrower © Adam Harrower © Adam Harrower + 10