Michael Graves Defends the Portland Building from Demolition Threats

The Building in 1982. Photo by Steve Morgan via Wikimedia Commons

Last week, attended a public conversation with Randy Gragg, director of The University of Oregon’s John Yeon Center to discuss the Portland Building, America’s first postmodern building. The discussion centered around the famed, 1980s building’s many problems – “dark, leaky and claustrophobic” interiors,” pedestrian-unfriendly parking garage, and more – asking Graves for his advice on whether the city should update it or tear it down. His response, “The whole idea of tearing the building down, it’s like killing a child… I don’t know how to react to that.” Read all of Graves’ responses to tenant complaints here on the Oregon Live.

Bridging the Divide: chadbourne + doss’ Scheme “Stitches” Portland Communities with Rec Center Overpasses

© chadbourne + doss

We’ve all traveled along an interstate overpass. In most cases they are constructed of bleak concrete, tattooed in graffiti, and built with the sole purpose of getting you across lanes of heavy traffic as quickly as possible. They are a bridge at the bare minimum, but what if they provide something more for the communities they connect?

In a recent ideas competition, AIA Portland called for creative proposals that would best bridge local neighborhoods divided by Interstate 405. The winning entry, “Five Bridges” by chadbourne + doss, posits that the best way to do this is with inhabitable overpasses.

EGWW / SERA Architects + Cutler Anderson Architect

© Nic Lehoux

Architects: SERA Architects, Cutler Anderson Architect
Location: Portland, OR 97204,
Year: 2013
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

Overton 19 Townhouses / Works Partnership Architecture

© Joshua Jay Elliott

Architects: Works Partnership Architecture
Location: Portland, OR,
Design Team: William Neburka, Carrie Strickland, William Ullman
Contractor: Rainier Pacific
Area: 8220.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Joshua Jay Elliott

Vestas North American Corporate Headquarter / Ankrom Moisan Architects

© Jeremy Bitterman

Architects: Ankrom Moisan Architects
Location: Pearl District, Portland, OR,
Area: 172000.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Jeremy Bitterman

Has Cycling Hit A Speed Bump?

The Skycycle proposal by Foster + Partners and Space Syntax. Image © Foster + Partners

There are few recent trends in urbanism that have received such widespread support as cycling: many consider cycling the best way for cities to reduce congestion and pollution, make cities more dense and vibrant, and increase the activity and therefore health of citizens. Thus, it’s no surprise a number of schemes have been proposed worldwide to promote cycling as an attractive way to get around.

However, recently it seems that many cycling schemes are running into bumpy ground. Read on to find out more.

The Portland Problem: $95 Million for a Hated Building?

The Building in 1982. Image © Steve Morgan via Wikimedia Commons

In a provocative article,The Atlantic Cities explores the dilemma which Portland currently finds itself in: the -designed Portland Building, one of the most important examples of early postmodernism, requires renovation work to the tune of $95 million; unfortunately, most residents of Portland “really, really hate” the building – as they have since it was constructed in 1983. Should the city spend so much money renovating a building which is unpopular, dysfunctional and poorly built just because of its cultural significance? Read the original article for more.

Tower House / Benjamin Waechter Architect

© Lara Swimmer

Architects: Benjamin Waechter Architect
Location: , OR,
Year: 2013
Photographs: Lara Swimmer

Oakley House / Benjamin Waechter Architect

© Lara Swimmer

Architects: Benjamin Waechter Architect
Location: Portland, OR,
Architect In Charge:
Year: 2013
Photographs: Lara Swimmer

Ziba Design World Headquarters / Holst Architecture

© Stephen Miller

Architects: Holst Architecture
Location: , OR, USA
Team: R&H Construction, Brightworks
Area: 76,000 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Stephen Miller

AD Classics: The Portland Building / Michael Graves

The Building in 1982. Photo by Steve Morgan via Wikimedia Commons

The Portland Building, by architect and product designer , is considered the first major built work of Postmodernist architecture. The design, which displays numerous symbolic elements on its monumental facades, stands in purposeful contrast to the functional Modernist architecture that was dominant at the time. As Graves explains of his architecture: it’s “a symbolic gesture, an attempt to re-establish a language of architecture and values that are not a part of modernist homogeneity.”

Read more about this controversial building after the break… 

AD Architecture School Guide: Portland State University School of Architecture

image via sageclassroom.com

Social justice. How can that be achieved? At Portland State University School of Architecture, faculty and students are exploring just this issue in different forms. Often when people think of Portland or the state of , images of “crunchy” eco-“warriors” come to mind, but these issues are not simply proxies for a lifestyle or consumer choices. Rather, when discussing people and ecology, the issues are about resources. Specifically, how do humans use and allocate resources to promote fair, well-distributed advancements rather than exploitation, oppression and conspicuous consumption.

Portland State University’s School of Architecture launches Center for Public Interest Design

via State University

Portland State University’s School of Architecture has announced the launch of its new Center for Public Interest Design, a research center that aims to investigate and utilize the power of design to make social, economic and environmental change in disadvantaged communities worldwide. The Center is the first of its kind in the nation.

FINE / Boora Architects

© Jon Jensen

Architects: Boora Architects
Location: 1140 Southwest 11th Avenue #200, , OR 97201,
Contractor: Howard S. Wright Construction
Area: 5475.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Jon Jensen

‘Strange Utility: Architecture Toward Other Ends’ Symposium

Philippe Rahm – Diurnisme / Courtesy of PSU

Taking place April 26-27, the ‘Strange Utility: Architecture Toward Other Ends’ Symposium will explore the following provocative questions: How is architecture’s use value defined, and by whom? How can turning to other disciplines’ unexpected utilization of architecture expand our perception of its utility? And what are the future utilities of architecture? Today, the idea of architecture’s utility is perhaps more diverse than ever, as architecture commonly mingles with other disciplines, and as new typologies of building design emerge almost daily. Organized by Portland State University School of Architecture, three keynote speakers—Philippe Rahm, Jimenez Lai and Jill Stoner—as well as eleven notable architects, artists and academics will participate. More information after the break.

Fox House / PIQUE

© Nicole Werner

Architects: PIQUE
Location: , Oregon,
Area: 4,175 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Nicole Werner, Alan Brandt, Bob Woodward

Randall Children´s Hospital / ZGF Architects

© Nick Merrick / Hendrich Blessing

Architects: ZGF Architects
Location: 2801 North Gantenbein Avenue, Portland, OR 97227,
Project Architect: Halliday Meisburger
Architects In Charge: Adam Christie, Justin Brooks, Randy McGee, Scott Tarrant, Nick Micheels Medical Planners: Jennifer Mountain, Solvei Neiger, Sue Ann Barton
Area: 334000.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Nick Merrick / Hendrich Blessing, Eckert & Eckert, ZGF Architects LLP

‘Voices of Design: 25 Years of Architalx’ Exhibition

© Sandy Agrafiotis Photography

Currently on display at the Portland Museum of Art until May 19, ‘Voices of Design: 25 Years of Architalx’ showcases the power of design through an interactive exhibition featuring work of some of the world’s leading architects and designers. The display, designed by architects Tim Ventimiglia and Jennifer Whitburn of Ralph Appelbaum Associates, includes a 17-foot-tall tower with three levels of images that alternately reveal themselves and disappear. A dynamic image projection will light up two sides of the tower by using projectors embedded in the interior of the tower and will feature infrared light sensors, creating touch interactivity for visitors. More images and information on the exhibition after the break.