ArchitectureBoston’s Latest Issue Offers Design Recommendations For A New Boston

Available today, the spring 2014 issue of ArchitectureBoston magazine, Blueprint for a New Mayor, investigates the critical design challenges facing ’s first new leader in two decades. The issue focuses on the city’s challenges surrounding housing, transportation, public space, and regionalization, plus offers recommendations for designing a that is more open, safe, beautiful, and fair. Visit architectureboston.com to read the latest issue.

Berklee College of Music / William Rawn Associates

© Bruce T. Martin Photography

Architects: William Rawn Associates
Location: Boston, MA, USA
Principal For Design: Cliff Gayley, , LEED AP
Area: 167,000 sqft
Year: 2014
Photographs: Bruce T. Martin Photography

Winners of the 2013 BSA Design Awards Announced

Via Verde – The Green Way / Dattner Architects and Grimshaw Architects © David Sundberg | Esto Photographics

The has announced the winners of the 2013 Design Awards Program. With programs ranging from accessible design to unbuilt architecture, the following projects were awarded top honors for being and New England’s most prized examples of excellent design.

Case Studies in Coastal Vulnerability: Boston, Seoul, Hamburg, Bangladesh & New York

Water floods the Plaza Shops in Manhattan after Superstorm Sandy, 2012. Photo: Allison Joyce/Getty Images.

This article originally appeared in the latest issue of ArchitectureBoston as “Troubled Waters.“ 

The challenges of sea-level rise cross boundaries of all sorts: geographic, political, social, economic. Proposed mitigation strategies will also necessarily shift and overlap. Here, we present five case studies from across the globe that offer intriguing ways—some operational, some philosophical—to address the threats associated with climate change. Drawing on a research initiative focused on vulnerabilities in Boston, a team at Sasaki Associates developed these additional design-strategy icons to illustrate the layered approaches. They are adaptable, the better to meet the unique demands of each coastal community.

Massachusetts College of Art and Design’s Student Residence Hall / ADD Inc.

© Chuck Choi

Architects: ADD Inc.
Location: Boston, MA, USA
Area: 145,600 sqft
Year: 2013
Photographs: Chuck Choi, Lucy Chen, Peter Vanderwarker

Design: A Long Term Preventative Medicine

New York City’s High Line. Image © Iwan Baan

The American Institute of Architects () and MIT’s Center for Advanced Urbanism has produced a new report examining urban in eight of the USA’s largest cities, which has been translated into a collection of meaningful findings for architects, designers, and urban planners. With more than half of the world’s population living in urban areas – a statistic which is projected to grow to 70% by 2050 – the report hinges around the theory that “massive urbanization can negatively affect human and environmental in unique ways” and that, in many cases, these affects can be addressed by architects and designers by the way we create within and build upon our cities.

ArchitectureBoston’s Latest Issue Tackles Coastal Vulnerability

Courtesy of ArchitectureBoston, Boston Society of Architects

The new issue of ArchitectureBoston magazine, Coast, focuses on the thin border of continental crust that is home to 45 percent of the world’s population. The issue examines how architects and urban planners can mitigate or accommodate sea-level rise and storm surges associated with . Coast promotes debate and offers answers and opportunities surrounding a problem that will inevitably affect most of the world’s urban residents in years to come.

Spaulding Hospital / Perkins+Will

© Steinkamp Photography

Architects: Perkins+Will
Location: Charlestown, Boston, , United States
Construction Manager: Walsh Brothers Incorporated
Area: 378,367 sqft
Year: 2013
Photographs: Steinkamp Photography, Anton Grassl/Esto

Hayden Building / CUBE Design + Research

Courtesy of

Architects: CUBE Design + Research
Location: , MA, USA
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of CUBE Design + Research

Dutch Mountains: People, Place, Purpose

Courtesy of

Francine Houben of Mecanoo will present Dutch Mountains: People, Place, Purpose, a lecture on the design of the new Dudley Square Municipal Office Facility, as part of the Fall 2013 Student Lecture Series on September 25, 2013 in Cascieri Hall.

Francine Houben directs her Mecanoo team with the ambition to design buildings with a strong respect for context; physical, historical and environmental. In her lecture Dutch Mountains: People, place, purpose, she presents her vision and philosophy as well as the participatory planning and design process that is fundamental to her work. Houben guides you through Mecanoo’s increasingly international portfolio, which features the recently opened Library of Birmingham integrated with the REP Theatre in the UK, as well as the Wei-Wu-Ying Centre for the Arts in Kaohsiung, Taiwan and the Dudley Municipal Offices in Boston – both currently under construction.

All three projects serve as catalysts for their respective cities and neighborhoods; however, Boston’s Dudley Square Municipal Center serves as a unique North American example of the reinvigoration of a community. With a long history of participatory planning and community engagement, Francine worked with , Boston’s Property & Construction Management, and the Boston Redevelopment Authority, along with neighborhood efforts, to produce a building that binds this community together. This lecture will present key moments in the process which lead to design solutions.

More on the lecture, including a short documentary on the project after the break.

reGEN Boston: Energizing Urban Living Competition

Boston Society of Architects Housing Committee and Emerging Professionals Network Presents reGEN Boston: Energizing Urban Housing, an international ideas competition with presenting sponsor First Republic Bank.

In the 21st Century, more people than ever will be living in . Generations are drawn together through the lifestyles a city can provide. In response to growing density in Urban areas, will renovate and re-purpose existing areas, and new urban centers are ripe to erupt. What new housing typologies will support this love for urban living? If , and other , want to retain their diverse demographic, and lasting appeal, there needs to be an enticing solution for housing or, the risks losing their greatest asset, residents.

ReGEN Boston seeks innovative housing typologies to responds to Boston’s need to house the continuing life-cycles of its residents. The City needs a new round of planning, charged with harnessing growth and extending it to the many neighborhoods, many of which have been overlooked or under valued.

Brigham Building for the Future Proposal / NBBJ

Courtesy of

Brigham and Women’s Hospital just broke ground last week on the Brigham Building for the Future, a 620,000 square-foot translational research and clinical facility designed by NBBJ. Located on the hospital’s Longwood campus, the 11-story project will house eight floors of research laboratories, three floors of clinics, a state-of-the-art imaging facility, social spaces, and a 400-car garage, along with associated site improvements. More images and architects’ description after the break.

‘Composite Landscapes: Photomontage and Landscape Architecture’ Exhibition

© Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Curated by Charles Waldheim, Ruettgers Consulting Curator of Landscape, the ‘Composite Landscapes: Photomontage and Landscape Architecture‘ exhibition opens this Thursday, June 27th, at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in . Examining the montage view, one of landscape architecture’s most recognizable representational forms, the exhibit gathers work from a select group of influential contemporary artists and a dozen of the world’s leading landscape architects. These composite views reveal practices of photomontage depicting the conceptual, experiential, and temporal dimensions of landscape. The exhibit runs until September 2nd. For more information, please visit here.

‘Reprogramming the City: Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure’ Exhibition

Courtesy of Space

Opening tomorrow, June 25th through September 29th at BSA Space, the ‘Reprogramming the City: Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure‘ exhibition celebrates more than 40 examples of imaginative reuse, repurposing and reimagining of urban infrastructure, from physical objects to the city’s most functional systems and surfaces. Curated by Scott Burnham, the new exhibition presents a global overview to serve alternate and expanded functions for urban dwellers and visitors. Featured exhibits will include numerous videos, photos, media stations, renderings, and models. For more information, please visit here. More images after the break.

The Indicator: Sheltering in Place

Rudolph’s UMass Dartmouth Library. Courtesy, UMass Dartmouth

Last Sunday James S. Russell, architecture critic for Bloomberg News and a former editor for Architectural Record, mused on his personal blog about the possible influence ’s Brutalist University of campus in Dartmouth may have had on Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the younger of the two Boston Marathon bombers who was also a student there.

Mr. Russell describes the campus as “a gigantic eerie, dozen-building concoction of grim ribbed-concrete hubris….” This is the sort of description that drives right to the heart of urban alienation. It’s Edvard Munch’s The Scream. This ability to sum up and drive the nail home is one reason he is the architecture critic for Bloomberg News. No side-stepping here.

Seattle Leads the Way in Tracking Building Energy Use

Courtesy of designbuildsource.com.au

Enthusiasm for water and energy data collection for commercial and residential buildings has been growing strong across the U.S. in major cities such as Austin, New York, Washington D.C. and San Francisco. It’s no surprise to learn that Earth-friendly Seattle is ahead of the game when it comes to tracking its buildings; reports show that the city is receiving data for a whopping 87% of its commercial and multi-residential buildings over 50,000 square feet, which totals to 1,160 individual properties covering over 200 million square feet of the city.

But that’s not all. New cities are hopping on the data collection bandwagon, most recently Minneapolis – the first city in the Midwest to adopt rules for energy benchmarking and disclosure. Other cities who already have a green reputation, such as , are upping their game to adopt this beneficial practice in an effort to create even healthier and more prosperous urban conditions. With the President himself expressing support for cutting energy use by constructing more energy efficient buildings at last week’s State of the Union address, water and energy data collection is finally receiving the attention and consideration it deserves.

More on tracking building energy use after the break…

I Want to Be Metropolitan: Boston Case Study

Courtesy of ORO

I Want to be METROPOLITAN is a research project on small scale metropolises, MINI Metropolis, using as a case study to provide a different reading of the city. The study focuses on showing the efforts that the city of has made in order to grow with metropolitan characteristics while remaining at a much smaller scale than cities like , London, or Tokyo. The morphology of Boston has been achieved through different metropolitan interventions that occur on different scales. These are divided on an infrastructural scale, urban scale, and architectural scale. By means of analyzing these different aspects, we can compose a vision of a future Boston, or Fictitious Boston, derived from its metropolitan potential.

ArchitectureBoston Expo (ABX)

Courtesy of

Produced by the Boston Society of Architects, the ArchitectureBoston Expo (ABX) will take place November 14-16 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. Boasting the most comprehensive education program and largest marketplace for the design and construction industry in New England, the event offers over 175 professional development opportunities. This covers a range of topics from building technology to design, software, social sustainability and code. The tradeshow and conference launches on Wednesday morning with Speaking of Architecture, an Opening Plenary panel discussion moderated by Renée Loth of ArchitectureBoston Magazine and Robert Campbell FAIA of the Boston Globe. Tours are also provided, allowing attendees an inside look into some of the most unique and interesting buildings in Greater Boston, including the recently re-opened Tea Party Museum, Hostelling International and the MassArt Tower Building.To register and for more information, please visit here.