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When Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier Had a Public Argument in The New York Times

09:30 - 26 May, 2017
When Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier Had a Public Argument in The New York Times, Left: Frank Lloyd Wright photographed by Al Ravenna. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> in Public Domain. Right: Le Corbusier. Image © Willy Rizzo
Left: Frank Lloyd Wright photographed by Al Ravenna. Image via Wikimedia in Public Domain. Right: Le Corbusier. Image © Willy Rizzo

Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier are both architects who were known for their grand and innovative ideas—as well as for their high esteem for their own opinions. The two did not, however, see eye to eye in their visions for the future of American cities and civilization. Both architects had utopian, all-encompassing plans for their ideal American city, combining social as well as architectural ideas. In 1932, both described these ideas in The New York Times; in these two articles Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier made their differing beliefs perfectly clear to the public.

Organic Architecture Beyond Frank Lloyd Wright by Aaron G. Green

05:30 - 22 May, 2017
Organic Architecture Beyond Frank Lloyd Wright by Aaron G. Green

Aaron G Green FAIA was an internationally known organic architect of “striking originality and grace.” His diversi ed architectural works include commercial, industrial, municipal, judicial, religious, interment, mass housing, and educational projects. Aaron Green taught advanced architectural design at Stanford University Department of Architecture for fifteen years.In the early 1940s, Aaron Green became a member of Frank Lloyd Wright’s apprentice group, the Taliesin Fellowship. He maintained a close relationship with Frank Lloyd Wright over the next 20 years.

Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold

04:30 - 22 May, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) is the most renowned and popular architect and designer in America. His buildings, including Fallingwater and New York's Guggenheim Museum, are iconic landmarks. Now you can create 14 of his best loved buildings using the art of kirigami (cutting and folding).

Each project features step-by-step instructions and a template that you remove from the book. You follow the lines on the template, cutting and folding to make your own model. All you need is a craft knife, a cutting mat, and a ruler. Clear cutting tips help you with the tricky stages, while photos of the finished

Frank Lloyd Wright 150th Birthday Celebration

16:43 - 28 April, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright 150th Birthday Celebration

The Guggenheim celebrates Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th birth year kicking off on Thursday, June 8, Wright’s 150th birthday, with a special reduced admission of $1.50. Visitors will be treated to free birthday cupcakes in the Guggenheim’s newly renovated Cafe 3, which will feature large-scale, rarely seen photographs of the museum during its construction. An actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright will be on-site engaging with visitors between 9 am and 1 pm.

Wright Sites: A Guide to Frank Lloyd Wright Public Places

03:00 - 28 April, 2017
Wright Sites: A Guide to Frank Lloyd Wright Public Places

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) revolutionized American architecture through his innovative treatment of space, light, and materials. America’s best-known architect of the 20th century, Wright-designed buildings and structures continue to thrill and inspire.

Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture to Change Name with New Branding

12:15 - 27 April, 2017

Following a successful several-year long campaign to maintain its accreditation as an institute of higher learning, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture has announced a name change and rebranding, as part of efforts stipulated by the Higher Learning Commission to distance itself from the larger Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. As a nod to the institution’s origins as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin Fellowship, the school will now be known as the School of Architecture at Taliesin.

See How Frank Lloyd Wright's "Tree of Life" Stained Glass Windows are Assembled

16:00 - 21 March, 2017

As an architect, Frank Lloyd Wright was known for many things, but perhaps his most famed characteristic was his exceptional attention to detail – in many of his projects, each furniture piece was designed specifically for its intended location. This trait carried over into the design of the windows in his houses. Borrowing from organic motifs, Wright created a series of compositions suited for each house, from the tall, triangular stained glass windows of the Hollyhock House to the mahogany Samara clerestory panels of the Bachman-Wilson House.

Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture Will Maintain Accreditation

12:30 - 17 March, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture Will Maintain Accreditation, Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin West, where students spend half of the year studying.. Image © Flickr user cmichael67. Licensed under CC BY 2.0
Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin West, where students spend half of the year studying.. Image © Flickr user cmichael67. Licensed under CC BY 2.0

After a several year battle, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture has been approved to maintain its accreditation as an institute of higher learning. The school’s status had earlier been threatened due to new laws by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) that require universities, colleges and other institutions to be financially and administratively independent from "larger institutions with multi-faceted missions."

With the decision, the school will be able to continue to offer its 3-year Master of Architecture program, as well as its additional education programs such as its 8-week-long non-degree Immersion Program.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater: Keepsake or Liability?

04:00 - 10 March, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater: Keepsake or Liability?, H. Mark Weidman Photography/Alamy. Image Courtesy of Laurence King Publishing
H. Mark Weidman Photography/Alamy. Image Courtesy of Laurence King Publishing

Asked for his occupation in a court of law, Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) replied ‘The world’s greatest architect’. His wife remonstrated with him. ‘I had no choice, Olgivanna’, he told her, ‘I was under oath.’

See Frank Lloyd Wright’s Missing Works Recreated in Photorealistic Renders

08:00 - 6 March, 2017
See Frank Lloyd Wright’s Missing Works Recreated in Photorealistic Renders, Larkin Building (1903-1950), digitally reconstructed by David Romero. Image © David Romero
Larkin Building (1903-1950), digitally reconstructed by David Romero. Image © David Romero

With the help of a vast array of software, Spanish architect David Romero has digitally recreated a series of iconic works by Frank Lloyd Wright, two of which have been demolished and a third that was never built. The three projects were based in the United States: the Larkin Administration Building (1903-1950), the Rose Pauson House (1939-1943) and the Trinity Chapel (1958). 

"The 3D visualization tools that we have are rarely used to investigate the past architecture and the truth is that there is a huge field to explore,” said Romero in an interview with ArchDaily about his project Hooked on the Past. Romero worked with AutoCAD, 3ds Max, Vray, and Photoshop while restoring black and white photographs, sketches and drawings of these works.

Rose Pauson House  (1939-1943). Image © David Romero Rose Pauson House  (1939-1943). Image © David Romero Trinity Chapel (1958), an unbuilt project by Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © David Romero Trinity Chapel (1958), an unbuilt project by Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © David Romero +29

9 Times Architects Transformed Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum

07:00 - 13 October, 2016
Exhibition design by Gae Aulenti. Installation view: The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943–1968, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 1994–January 22, 1995. Photo: David Heald
Exhibition design by Gae Aulenti. Installation view: The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943–1968, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 1994–January 22, 1995. Photo: David Heald

This article originally appeared on guggenheim.org/blogs under the title "Nine Guggenheim Exhibitions Designed by Architects," and is used with permission.

Exhibition design is never straightforward, but that is especially true within the highly unconventional architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum. Hanging a painting in a traditional “box” gallery can be literally straightforward, whereas every exhibition at the Guggenheim is the reinvention of one of the world’s most distinctive and iconic buildings. The building mandates site-specific exhibition design—partition walls, pedestals, vitrines, and benches are custom-fabricated for every show. At the same time, these qualities of the building present an opportunity for truly memorable, unique installations. Design happens simultaneously on a micro and macro scale—creating display solutions for individual works of art while producing an overall context and flow that engages the curatorial vision for the exhibition. This is why the museum’s stellar in-house exhibition designers all have an architecture background. They have developed intimate relationships with every angle and curve of the quarter-mile ramp and sloping walls.

The Strange Habits of Top Architects

07:00 - 10 October, 2016

Well-known architects are easy to admire or dismiss from afar, but up close, oddly humanizing habits often come to light. However, while we all have our quirks, most people's humanizing habits don't give an insight into how they became one of the most notable figures in their field of work. The following habits of several top architects reveal parts of their creative process, how they relax, or simply parts of their identity. Some are inspiring and some are surprising, but all give a small insight into the mental qualities that are required to be reach the peak of the architectural profession—from an exceptional work drive to an embrace of eccentricity (and a few more interesting qualities besides).

Luxury Living Through the Ages, From the Castle to the Villa

04:00 - 2 September, 2016
Luxury Living Through the Ages, From the Castle to the Villa, © Shutterstock user Naumenko Aleksandr
© Shutterstock user Naumenko Aleksandr

Although societies have transformed through the ages, wealth never truly seems to go out of style. That said, the manner in which it is expressed continually adapts to each successive cultural epoch. As a consequence of evolving social mores and emerging technologies, the ideal of “luxury” and “splendour” sees priorities shift from opulence to subtlety, from tradition to innovation, and from visual ornamentation to physical comfort.

AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. In these ten examples of "high-end" residences, which represent centuries of history across three separate continents, the ever-changing nature of status, power and fine living is revealed.

© Kazunori Fujimoto Courtesy of Wikimedia user Wolfgang Moroder under CC 3.0 © Flavio Bragaia © Peter Aaron / OTTO +10

Graham Foundation Announces $419,000 in 2016 Grants to Organizations

15:00 - 9 August, 2016
Graham Foundation Announces $419,000 in 2016 Grants to Organizations

Coinciding with the organization’s 60th anniversary this year, The Graham Foundation has announced the list of recipients of their 2016 Grants to Organizations, a total of $419,000 (USD) to be given to 31 exemplary projects from around the world. The Organization Grants are awarded to projects displaying “originality, capacity, feasibility and potential for impact” and are divided amongst four categories: Exhibition, Film/Video/New Media, Public Program, and Publication.

In its 60 years, the foundation has made significant impacts in the fields of art and architecture through the awarding of grants to outstanding projects, exhibitions and publications. They have expanded their exhibition programming in the past few years, including a display at the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennal last year.

Continue after the break for the full list of recipients.

MoMA Announces a Major Retrospective to Commemorate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday

16:30 - 8 June, 2016

Today, the Museum of Modern Art in New York announced a major retrospective of Frank Lloyd Wright's work to be displayed in 2017, commemorating 150 years since the architect's birth. Opening next June, the exhibition will feature approximately 450 works spanning Wright’s career including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with several works that have rarely or never been shown publicly.

Gallery: Frank Lloyd Wright's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Laurian Ghinitoiu

10:00 - 8 June, 2016
Gallery: Frank Lloyd Wright's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, which opened in 1959, was controversial for being “less a museum than it is a monument to Frank Lloyd Wright.” Although Wright intended to display paintings on the curved interior walls of the central open space, the concave walls made it unworkable. Instead, the central atrium became a place for procession and the uncovering of space through movement. The continuous ramp overlooking the atrium allows people to interact from different levels.

Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu places people at the core of his photography which perhaps explains how, in this photoset of the Guggenheim Museum to mark Wright's 149th birthday, he captured the essence and vitality of the Guggenheim Museum. While some images depict the museum’s atrium as a place for passing-by, wandering or socializing, others grasp the growing influence of photography and self-representation on visitors’ experience. Some shots also show the building in its urban context with people involved in daily life activities.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +30

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

06:00 - 8 June, 2016
Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

AD Classics: Kings Road House / Rudolf Schindler

04:00 - 16 March, 2016
AD Classics: Kings Road House / Rudolf Schindler, © Joshua White
© Joshua White

Secluded behind a screen of tall bamboo shoots in West Hollywood, Los Angeles, the Kings Road House may be considered the first home ever built in the Modernist style.[1] Designed by Rudolf Schindler in 1921, the architect’s use of tilt-slab concrete construction (highly innovative at the time) and an informal studio layout, set it apart from its contemporaries; indeed, the design would set the tone for other Modernist residential design for decades.

© Joshua White © Luke Fiederer Courtesy of Flickr user John Zacherle Courtesy of Flickr user collectmoments +10