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Graham Foundation Announces $419,000 in 2016 Grants to Organizations

15:00 - 9 August, 2016
Graham Foundation Announces $419,000 in 2016 Grants to Organizations

Coinciding with the organization’s 60th anniversary this year, The Graham Foundation has announced the list of recipients of their 2016 Grants to Organizations, a total of $419,000 (USD) to be given to 31 exemplary projects from around the world. The Organization Grants are awarded to projects displaying “originality, capacity, feasibility and potential for impact” and are divided amongst four categories: Exhibition, Film/Video/New Media, Public Program, and Publication.

In its 60 years, the foundation has made significant impacts in the fields of art and architecture through the awarding of grants to outstanding projects, exhibitions and publications. They have expanded their exhibition programming in the past few years, including a display at the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennal last year.

Continue after the break for the full list of recipients.

MoMA Announces a Major Retrospective to Commemorate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday

16:30 - 8 June, 2016

Today, the Museum of Modern Art in New York announced a major retrospective of Frank Lloyd Wright's work to be displayed in 2017, commemorating 150 years since the architect's birth. Opening next June, the exhibition will feature approximately 450 works spanning Wright’s career including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with several works that have rarely or never been shown publicly.

Gallery: Frank Lloyd Wright's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Laurian Ghinitoiu

10:00 - 8 June, 2016
Gallery: Frank Lloyd Wright's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, which opened in 1959, was controversial for being “less a museum than it is a monument to Frank Lloyd Wright.” Although Wright intended to display paintings on the curved interior walls of the central open space, the concave walls made it unworkable. Instead, the central atrium became a place for procession and the uncovering of space through movement. The continuous ramp overlooking the atrium allows people to interact from different levels.

Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu places people at the core of his photography which perhaps explains how, in this photoset of the Guggenheim Museum to mark Wright's 149th birthday, he captured the essence and vitality of the Guggenheim Museum. While some images depict the museum’s atrium as a place for passing-by, wandering or socializing, others grasp the growing influence of photography and self-representation on visitors’ experience. Some shots also show the building in its urban context with people involved in daily life activities.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +30

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

06:00 - 8 June, 2016
Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

AD Classics: Kings Road House / Rudolf Schindler

04:00 - 16 March, 2016
AD Classics: Kings Road House / Rudolf Schindler, © Joshua White
© Joshua White

Secluded behind a screen of tall bamboo shoots in West Hollywood, Los Angeles, the Kings Road House may be considered the first home ever built in the Modernist style.[1] Designed by Rudolf Schindler in 1921, the architect’s use of tilt-slab concrete construction (highly innovative at the time) and an informal studio layout, set it apart from its contemporaries; indeed, the design would set the tone for other Modernist residential design for decades.

© Joshua White © Luke Fiederer Courtesy of Flickr user John Zacherle Courtesy of Flickr user collectmoments +10

Frank Lloyd Wright Explains Why He Was Labeled "Arrogant" in this 1957 Interview

14:45 - 16 February, 2016

I think any man who really has faith in himself will be dubbed arrogant, I suppose. I think that's what happened to me. - Frank Lloyd Wright

In this video produced by Blank on Blank, Frank Lloyd Wright shares his thoughts on New York City, religious architecture, and being labeled arrogant. The interview was taken from a 1957 episode of The Mike Wallace Interview when Wright was 90 years old. Showing his trademark fieriness even at his advanced age, Wright claims that if he had another 15 years he would be able to change the whole of the United States for the better, dismissing the judgement of those with the audacity to call him arrogant. Watch the animated video above, and read on after the break for some of the interview's most quotable moments.

Walk Inside: Google Cultural Institute Puts New York's Guggenheim On The Map

04:00 - 25 January, 2016
Walk Inside: Google Cultural Institute Puts New York's Guggenheim On The Map, Installation view: Storylines: Contemporary Art at the Guggenheim. Image © Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Installation view: Storylines: Contemporary Art at the Guggenheim. Image © Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

The Google Cultural Institute have teamed up with New York City's iconic Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and completed in 1959, to open its doors through Street View. Additionally, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation has made over 120 artworks from its collection available for online viewing. "Using Street View technology, it will now be possible to tour the museum’s distinctive spiral ramps from anywhere online," the Foundation said.

This Drone Video of Los Angeles Highlights the City’s Many Murals

09:30 - 25 December, 2015

In this wide-ranging video, drone videographer Ian Wood captures the diversity of the built environment in Los Angeles, featuring architectural gems on equal footing with freeways and freight trains. The buildings and locations featured in the video span over a century of architectural history in LA, and cover the region’s vast geography, including such icons as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House, Cesar Pelli’s Pacific Design Center, Eric Owen MossStealth building, and Morphosis’ recently completed Emerson College Los Angeles.

But what truly sets this video apart is how it highlights the many murals spread throughout the city. Often utilizing otherwise blank facades facing parking lots and alleys, these murals are nonetheless an integral part of LA’s urban fabric, as illustrated in this video. Sadly though, as Wood notes on the video description, there were many more murals that vanished before he was able to get them on video.

Chicago's New Apple Store Is Inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Homes

16:00 - 24 November, 2015
Chicago's New Apple Store Is Inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Homes, via MacRumors
via MacRumors

Apple's new Foster + Partners-designed flagship store in Chicago is said to have been inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Style Homes outside the city. Unveiled first by the Chicago Tribune, the store will feature a 14-foot entry pavilion that will usher visitors from Michigan Avenue down into the sales floor backdropped with views of the Chicago River. A "grand flight of stairs" will offer pedestrians an alternative route to the riverside walkway that flanks the bank. 

Exploring Chicago's Architectural Legacy Through 5 Exceptional Projects

08:00 - 16 November, 2015
Exploring Chicago's Architectural Legacy Through 5 Exceptional Projects, The Chicago Skyline. © Joseph Sohm / shutterstock.com
The Chicago Skyline. © Joseph Sohm / shutterstock.com

Chicago has long been known for distinctive architecture, and this year’s inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial has only furthered that reputation. Although it is nearly impossible to narrow down the countless iconic structures, in celebration of the Biennial, we have compiled five Chicago buildings that highlight the many phases of the city’s architectural history.

At Crystal Bridges Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright's Bachman-Wilson House Reframes Architecture as Art

09:30 - 5 November, 2015
At Crystal Bridges Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright's Bachman-Wilson House Reframes Architecture as Art, Back Exterior. Image Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas; Photos by Nancy Nolan Photography
Back Exterior. Image Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas; Photos by Nancy Nolan Photography

Architecture and art have had a long and complicated relationship. Many people consider architecture to be “the mother art,” while others believe the burdens of program and pragmatism prohibit architecture from the realm of pure artistry. But what happens when architecture is displayed alongside art? Next Wednesday, November 11th, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas is primed to open Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian-era Bachman-Wilson house to the public. It is the first Wright home to be relocated to an art museum property, accompanying the museum's Moshe Safdie-designed building within a short walk of artworks by Norman Rockwell, Donald Judd and Andy Warhol. These unique juxtapositions open up new conversations about the goals of preserving buildings as well as chances to contemplate architecture’s place within art history.

Master Bedroom. Image Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas; Photos by Nancy Nolan Photography Living Space to Foyer. Image Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas; Photos by Nancy Nolan Photography Living Space. Image Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas; Photos by Nancy Nolan Photography Dining. Image Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas; Photos by Nancy Nolan Photography +8

PBS Film Explores the Life of Frank Lloyd Wright Photographer Pedro E. Guerrero

12:00 - 26 September, 2015

PBS’ American Masters series and Latino Public Broadcasting’s VOCES series have teamed up for the first time to delve into the life and work of Pedro E. Guerrero, a Mexican American photographer from Mesa, Arizona, who is known for his photography of the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, among other artists.

The film, Pedro E. Guerrero: A Photographer’s Journey, explores Guerrero’s photography, showing his collaboration with Frank Lloyd Wright to “produce insightful portraits of important modernist architecture,” which launched him to become “one of the most sought-after photographers of the ‘Mad Men’ era.” While Guerrero was extremely popular at the time, his story today is still largely unknown.

Go on a Virtual Tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin East

08:00 - 8 September, 2015
Go on a Virtual Tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin East, Taliesin East by Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © © Flickr CC User Edward Stojakovic
Taliesin East by Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © © Flickr CC User Edward Stojakovic

Taliesin (or Taliesin East, following the construction of a Taliesin West in 1937) was the lifetime home and studio of distinguished American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright. Designed by Wright himself, the building was built in 1911, and underwent several changes before being finalized as its current iteration in 1937. For many years, the building has been open to the public, many of whom make a trip to Spring Green, Wisconsin for Taliesin alone. However, the building is also open to those without the means to travel to see it, thanks to a virtual tour by Tour de Force 360 VR.

Help Recreate and Replace Frank Lloyd Wright's San Francisco Call Building Model at Taliesin

14:00 - 6 September, 2015
Help Recreate and Replace Frank Lloyd Wright's San Francisco Call Building Model at Taliesin, via Organic Architecture + Design Archives
via Organic Architecture + Design Archives

After a sale of the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives in 2013, Frank Lloyd Wright's model of The San Francisco Call Building, originally residing at Taliesin and later, Hillside Home School, was moved to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). The Organic Architecture and Design Archives, Inc. (OAD) believes that this model - a striking 8-foot tall replica built originally for the 1940 MoMA Exhibition - was "an integral part of the design of Taliesin."

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wasmuth Portfolio on Display at SC Johnson’s Headquarters

18:00 - 26 August, 2015
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wasmuth Portfolio on Display at SC Johnson’s Headquarters, © SC Johnson
© SC Johnson

From the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Administration Building and 15-story Research Tower, to the Norman Foster-designed Fortaleza Hall, SC Johnson’s global headquarters is rich in design and history. The company’s gallery, At Home with Frank Lloyd Wright, houses an exhibit featuring lithographic plates from the Wasmuth Portfolio, a collection that has been hailed as one of the most important publications of the early modern architecture movement and established Wright as the international icon he is today.

The gallery features 43 of the Portfolio’s 100 framed lithographs as well as artifacts of Wright’s most famous work, revealing plans and perspectives of the buildings in natural landscapes. Wright’s experiences and personal struggles leading up to, and throughout, the creation of the Portfolio were the backdrop for some of his history-altering work like the SC Johnson headquarters’ Administration Building and Research Tower.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin 4 Lamp Now Available on Yamagiwa

16:31 - 31 July, 2015
Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin 4 Lamp Now Available on Yamagiwa, © Yamagiwa
© Yamagiwa

Update: The product is available internationally, but has yet to be released in the US. 

You can now adorn your home with your very own Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesin 4 lamp. Lighting brand Yamagiwa and the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation have reached an agreement to sell reproductions of the wooden lamp.

Available in both cherry and walnut, the towering geometrical lamp was originally designed by Wright for the Hillside Home School theater that had burned and was reconstructed at Taliesin in 1952. It features an array of stacked boxes, embellished with red accents, that indirectly reflect off directional boards placed above and below each cube. 

© Yamagiwa © Yamagiwa © Yamagiwa © Yamagiwa +8

Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple Undergoes Massive Restoration

14:42 - 30 July, 2015
Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple Undergoes Massive Restoration , © Flickr CC User matt72
© Flickr CC User matt72

Frank Lloyd Wrights's Unity Temple is undergoing a much needed $23 million restoration. As the Chicago Tribune reports, the Oak Park temple's integrity was first called into question when a large piece of the ceiling fell above the pulpit in 2008 (thankfully no one was hurt).

The comprehensive overhaul is going beyond restoring the building's to its original beauty; a geothermal heating system and air conditioning will be integrated into the building and site for the first time, allowing the uninterrupted services year-round.

The refurbished temple will reopen in late 2016. 

"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships

09:30 - 9 July, 2015
"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships, Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA
Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA

The world of architecture is small. So small in fact, that Rem Koolhaas has been credited with the creation of over forty practices worldwide, led by the likes of Zaha Hadid and Bjarke Ingels. Dubbed “Baby Rems” by Metropolis Magazine, this Koolhaas effect is hardly an isolated pattern, with manifestations far beyond the walls of OMA. The phenomenon has dominated the world of architecture, assisted by the prevalence and increasing necessity of internships for burgeoning architects.

In a recent article for Curbed, Patrick Sisson dug into the storied history of internships to uncover some unexpected connections between the world's most prolific architects. With the help of Sisson's list, we've compiled a record of the humble beginnings of the household names of architecture. Where did Frank Gehry get his start? Find out after the break.

Renzo Piano's pavilion at Louis Kahn's Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Robert Laprelle Jeanne Gang worked on OMA's Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Mies van der Rohe worked on Behren's AEG Turbine Factory. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>. Image © Flickr CC user Joseph The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York by Louis Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Jack E. Boucher +8