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M CO Design Unveils Dragon-Inspired Infrastructural Designs for Hong Kong

16:00 - 3 December, 2016
M CO Design Unveils Dragon-Inspired Infrastructural Designs for Hong Kong, Courtesy of M CO Design
Courtesy of M CO Design

M CO Design has released its designs for “Dragon’s Link,” a new dragon-inspired, mixed-use infrastructure on the south side of Hong Kong Island “that will serve a large part of the community and will enhance a local historic monument,” the Tai Tam Dam, which will celebrate its 100th anniversary this coming February. 

Drawing inspiration from local traditions and the natural topography of Hong Kong, the project will create new connections within an existing network of roads and hiking trails in Tai Tam Country Park in “a juxtaposition of old and new,” in order to improve user experience and infrastructure.

Courtesy of Unknown Courtesy of M CO Design Courtesy of M CO Design Courtesy of M CO Design +17

Development by Design 2

17:28 - 30 November, 2016
Development by Design 2, Roca Barcelona Gallery
Roca Barcelona Gallery

If starchitecture isn’t dead, then it has surely been rendered irrelevant in a world struggling to provide decent living conditions to at least a quarter of the world’s population. A growing network of architects and urban planners are busy tackling the challenges posed by realities like unprecedented urban growth, climate change and conflict as opportunities to build a more just and sustainable future. As such, resilience, sustainable urban development, the effects of mass migration on cities, community participation, post-disaster response and disaster risk reduction are key issues within our master program that deserve a spotlight beyond the classroom and that today, more than ever, resonate with urban practitioners and the general public.

OMA’s Masterplan for Feyenoord City in Rotterdam Approved

10:02 - 30 November, 2016
OMA’s Masterplan for Feyenoord City in Rotterdam Approved , View from Water. Image © OMA
View from Water. Image © OMA

OMA has released images of their masterplan for Feyenoord City, Rotterdam, after the plan was approved by city’s mayor and alderman. Developed for the Feyenoord football club, the project will consist of a redeveloped mixed-use district centered around a new 63,000 seat stadium for the team located along the Maas River.

Feyenoord City Bird's-Eye View. Image © OMA Feyenoord City Bird's-Eye View. Image © OMA View - Kuip North. Image © OMA Stadium - Varkenoordseviaduct. Image © OMA +9

Staab Architekten Unveils Planning Designs for Cologne Historic Center

12:00 - 12 November, 2016
Staab Architekten Unveils Planning Designs for Cologne Historic Center, © Stab Architekten
© Stab Architekten

Staab Architekten has released its plans for the historic center of Cologne, which will include the research and administration buildings for the Römanisch-Germanisches Museum, the Kurienhaus der Hohen Domkirche (curia house of the high cathedral), and the Kölner Stadtmuseum (Cologne state museum). Through these buildings, the project will redefine the urban space around Cologne’s cathedral and generate a place where the city’s history can be “presented and explored from diverse perspectives.” 

© Stab Architekten © Stab Architekten © Stab Architekten © Stab Architekten +5

The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?

09:30 - 10 November, 2016
The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?, Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta
Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta

This article by Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, the cofounder of Snøhetta, was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Opinion: The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors."

Maybe with the sole exception of railway stations, public space is generally understood as outdoor space. Whether in the United States or in Europe, especially now with heightened concerns around security, there seems to be this determined way of privatizing everything that is indoors, even as we are increasingly aiming to improve access to public space outdoors. But in the layered systems of our cities of the future, we will need to focus on the public spaces that are found inside buildings—and make them accessible.

Why a City's Mayor Has To Be Its Chief Architect

09:30 - 4 November, 2016
Why a City's Mayor Has To Be Its Chief Architect, © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Miami_from_above.jpg'>Ron Reiring via Wikimedia</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Ron Reiring via Wikimedia licensed under CC BY 2.0

Elected in 2001, over eight years in office Miami's former mayor Manny Diaz oversaw one of the most dramatic urban transformations in the United States' history. Diaz was therefore invited to offer the opening remarks to the second day of the 2016 Design Matters Conference, presented by the Association of Architecture Organizations, which is currently taking place in the city. In his speech delivered at the Miami Center for Art and Design, Diaz explains how he developed the "Miami 21" zoning code to leverage the power of architecture and urban planning, ultimately turning Miami from a subject of jokes into one of the United States' most successful and admired cities. Below is an edited version of this speech.

Ron asked me to explain how a lawyer with no experience in elective office and with no training whatsoever in architecture, urban planning or city design ends up with land use and Miami 21 as the signature project of his administration.

Adjaye Associates Selected for San Francisco Shipyard Redesign

16:00 - 21 October, 2016
Adjaye Associates Selected for San Francisco Shipyard Redesign, San Francisco Shipyard. Image Courtesy of Adjaye Associates
San Francisco Shipyard. Image Courtesy of Adjaye Associates

Adjaye Associates has been announced as the firm that will serve as masterplan architect and creative director for the second phase of revitalization of the San Francisco Shipyard, the waterfront neighborhood located at Hunter’s Point along the San Francisco Bay.

The project, developed by FivePoint Holdings, is envisioned as a state-of-the-art commercial district containing offices, labs, research facilities and housing, and will feature a mix of reclaimed heritage buildings and new constructions. The plan will center around acres of public spaces and sports grounds.

“I’m thrilled to be partnering with FivePoint to explore ways to reinvigorate this site’s unique infrastructure for the 21st Century,” said David Adjaye, firm principal. “This is a project with incredible transformative potential; to be given the opportunity to contribute to San Francisco’s urban fabric in such a significant way is a true honor.”

Moscow Satellite City to Become First Classical Russian City Built From Scratch in Over 100 Years

06:00 - 11 October, 2016
Moscow Satellite City to Become First Classical Russian City Built From Scratch in Over 100 Years, Courtesy of Maksim Atayants & Maksim Atayants Workshop
Courtesy of Maksim Atayants & Maksim Atayants Workshop

Maksim Atayants and Maksim Atayants Workshop have announced the construction of Laikovo, a new, large, classically-designed city in the Moscow Region that will be built from scratch – which, according to the architects, will be the first classical city to be built from the ground up in Russia in over 100 years.

Intended to embody the best practices of Russian and global urban planning, the city will be designed in the modern classic style in five districts, and will become Moscow’s nearest satellite city, located near Rublyovka, with easy access to the paid expressway, the M-1 double.

50 percent of the 116-hectare city will be dedicated to public space, including a two-hectare park and lake at city center, as well as a main waterway that will become the Moscow Region’s longest artificial channel.

Courtesy of Maksim Atayants & Maksim Atayants Workshop Courtesy of Maksim Atayants & Maksim Atayants Workshop Courtesy of Maksim Atayants & Maksim Atayants Workshop Courtesy of Maksim Atayants & Maksim Atayants’s Workshop +9

Knight Cities Challenge: Open Call for Civic Innovators around the Country for Their Best Idea

01:00 - 11 October, 2016
Knight Cities Challenge: Open Call for Civic Innovators around the Country for Their Best Idea, Credit: Knight Foundation
Credit: Knight Foundation

From Charlotte, North Carolina, to San Jose, California, cities around the country are looking to address major challenges and build more successful communities. The Knight Cities Challenge, which opens today, is an invitation to engage in that process. It asks civic innovators to answer the question: What’s your best idea to make cities more successful?

4000 Shades of Green: Transborder Studio's Redesign Proposal for the "Grey Belt" in St. Petersburg

06:00 - 7 October, 2016
4000 Shades of Green: Transborder Studio's Redesign Proposal for the "Grey Belt" in St. Petersburg, The Grey Belt. Image © Tegmark and Transborder Studio
The Grey Belt. Image © Tegmark and Transborder Studio

Oslo-based Transborder Studios is one of nine international firms competing to transform St. Petersburg’s “Grey Belt,” a 4,000-hectare territory of inactive industrial buildings and open spaces. The firm, which just won a competition for the development of Oslo’s new “Agricultural District,” is proposing a green rejuvenation with four multi-performing landscapes, a productive buffer, and development hubs. 

© Tegmark and Transborder Studio Courtesy of Transborder Studio Courtesy of Transborder Studio Courtesy of Transborder Studio +14

KCAP & Kunst + Herbert Win Competition for “Garden City of the 21st Century” in Hamburg

16:20 - 30 September, 2016
KCAP & Kunst + Herbert Win Competition for “Garden City of the 21st Century” in Hamburg, © KCAP / Kunst + Herbert
© KCAP / Kunst + Herbert

KCAP Architects & Planners in cooperation with Kunst + Herbert have won the international Fischbeker Reethan competition to master plan the Harburg district of Hamburg, Germany. The 70 hectare site is being developed by the  IBA Hamburg (International Building Exhibition) as a new residential and business district with the aim of creating a “Garden City of the 21st Century.” The design will accommodate a total of 2,200 apartments, 100,000 square meters (1,080,000 square feet) of small industry space and nearly 200,000 square meters (2,150,000 square feet) of diverse public landscapes.

© KCAP / Kunst + Herbert © KCAP / Kunst + Herbert © KCAP / Kunst + Herbert © KCAP / Kunst + Herbert +6

2017 Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence: Call for Entries

15:07 - 27 September, 2016
2017 Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence: Call for Entries, 2015 Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence Gold Medalist - Miller's Court - Baltimore, MD
2015 Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence Gold Medalist - Miller's Court - Baltimore, MD

The Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence (RBA) celebrates transformative urban places distinguished by their economic and social contributions to our nation’s cities. Winners offer creative placemaking solutions that transcend the boundaries between architecture, urban design and planning and showcase innovative thinking about American cities. One Gold Medal of $50,000 and four Silver Medals of $10,000 will be awarded. 

Sasaki Wins Competition to Reshape Shanghai's Suzhou Creek

14:00 - 25 September, 2016
Sasaki Wins Competition to Reshape Shanghai's Suzhou Creek, Courtesy of Sasaki Associates
Courtesy of Sasaki Associates

U.S.-based firm Sasaki has won the international competition to redesign Suzhou Creek—also known as the Wusong River—in Shanghai, China, which was historically one of the city’s most vital water routes, but which, in recent decades, suffered severe pollution and neglect. After receiving a grant from the Asian Development Bank, the waterway has been cleaned and is now in the process of becoming a new centerpiece for Shanghai. 

Courtesy of Sasaki Associates Courtesy of Sasaki Associates Courtesy of Sasaki Associates Courtesy of Sasaki Associates +19

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Wins Competition for Mixed-Use Tower and Urban Plan in Stavanger, Norway

14:20 - 20 September, 2016
Schmidt Hammer Lassen Wins Competition for Mixed-Use Tower and Urban Plan in Stavanger, Norway, © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
© Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects has won an international competition for the design of an urban redevelopment plan and high-rise in Stavanger, Norway. Beating out entries from Snøhetta, UNStudio, Dark Arkitekter and Eder Biesel Arkitekter, the winning proposal, “Breiavatnet Lanterna,” features a dynamic scheme to support the proliferation of sustainable and creative work environments throughout the city.

The project encompasses a new public center, the transformation of an existing park and a new 101 meter (331 foot) tall tower that will contain 18,170 square meters (195,580 square feet) of highly-flexible space for offices, restaurants, conferences and exhibitions. Both the ground and top floors of the high-rise will be publicly accessible, ensuring the building will remain an asset for the entire community.

© Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects +14

MVRDV Wins Competition to Masterplan New Innovation Port in Hamburg

12:20 - 13 September, 2016
MVRDV Wins Competition to Masterplan New Innovation Port in Hamburg, MVRD’s masterplan foresees the development of a vast site of which hotels, conference halls, offices and start-ups, laboratories, research facilities and parking will occupy the site.. Image Courtesy of MVRDV
MVRD’s masterplan foresees the development of a vast site of which hotels, conference halls, offices and start-ups, laboratories, research facilities and parking will occupy the site.. Image Courtesy of MVRDV

MVRDV with co-architects morePlatz have won a competition to design the masterplan of the Hamburg Innovation Port, a new 70,000 square meter waterfront development that will add to the high-tech hub of Channel Hamburg in Hanse City, Hamburg. The plan for the mixed-use development uses a fusion of existing port typologies and dynamic architectural interventions to create a network of buildings containing hotels, laboratories, research facilities, offices for start-ups and a conference center.

MVRD’s masterplan foresees the development of a vast site of which hotels, conference halls, offices and start-ups, laboratories, research facilities and parking will occupy the site.. Image Courtesy of MVRDV A total surface of 70,000m2 will transform the waterways of  the Channel Hamburg development, the southern high-tech hub of Germany’s northern metropolis.. Image Courtesy of MVRDV The roofs of some buildings are partly green and partly used for terraces and solar cells.. Image Courtesy of MVRDV Part of the plan is the idea of a diverse public space in which each part has its own strong character inviting the office workers to have outside meetings and al fresco luncheons. . Image Courtesy of MVRDV +4

Photographer Raphael Olivier Explores the Suspended Reality of North Korea’s Socialist Architecture

09:30 - 8 September, 2016
Photographer Raphael Olivier Explores the Suspended Reality of North Korea’s Socialist Architecture, Ryugyong Hotel. Image © Raphael Olivier
Ryugyong Hotel. Image © Raphael Olivier

North Korea is one of the few countries still under communist rule, and probably the most isolated and unknown worldwide. This is a result of the philosophy of Juche – a political system based on national self-reliance which was partly influenced by principles of Marxism and Leninism.

In recent years though, the country has loosened its restrictions on tourism, allowing access to a limited number of visitors. With his personal photo series “North Korea – Vintage Socialist Architecture,” French photographer Raphael Olivier reports on Pyongyang’s largely unseen architectural heritage. ArchDaily interviewed Olivier about the project, the architecture he captured, and what he understood of North Korea’s architecture and way of life.

The Workers Party Foundation Monument . Image © Raphael Olivier Pyongyang International Cinema House. Image © Raphael Olivier Pyongyang Ice Rink . Image © Raphael Olivier Overpass. Image © Raphael Olivier +21

EFFEKT & karres+brands Win Competition to Transform Industrial Wasteland Into Vibrant Urban District in Roskilde

14:00 - 5 September, 2016
EFFEKT & karres+brands Win Competition to Transform Industrial Wasteland Into Vibrant Urban District in Roskilde, © EFFEKT
© EFFEKT

EFFEKT and collaborators karres+brands, WTM Engineers, ARUP and ALECTIA have won a competition to transform an industrial waste site into a new vibrant urban district and infrastructural hub in the historic center of the city of Roskilde, Denmark. Beating out seven other invited teams, the winning design will encompass 100,000 square meters of mixed-use development across existing railroad tracks, reuniting the city and “reinventing the station as an integral part of the city center.”

© EFFEKT © EFFEKT © EFFEKT © EFFEKT +21

Marwa Al-Sabouni Explains How Syrian Architecture Laid the Foundations for War

09:30 - 21 August, 2016

In 2014, Syrian architect Marwa al-Sabouni won the Syria category of the UN Habitat Mass Housing Competition for a housing scheme she developed for the city of Homs, her hometown. Now over two years later, Thames and Hudson has published her book Battle for Home: The Vision of a Young Architect in Syria. Throughout all of these events, al-Sabouni has remained in Syria. As the Guardian puts it: “As bombs fell around her, Syrian architect Marwa al-Sabouni stayed in Homs throughout the civil war, making plans to build hope from carnage.”

In this TEDSummit video, Al-Sabouni argues “that while architecture is not the axis around which all of human life rotates... it has the power to... direct human activity” She believes that the Old Islamic cities of Syria were once harmonious urban entities which advocated for co-habitation and tolerance through their intertwining. However, she posits that over the last century, beginning with French colonization, the Ancient towns were seen as un-modern and were gradually “improved” with elements of modernity: “brutal unfinished concrete blocks, aesthetic devastation and divisive communities that zoned communities by class, creed, or affluence.” This urban condition, she argues, is what created the conditions for the uprising-turned-civil war.