"It's Just the Beginning" — 'Real Review' Kickstarter Campaign Hits Milestone

04:55 - 19 October, 2015
Editors Jack Self and Shumi Bose, and designers Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath (OK-RM). Image © REAL
Editors Jack Self and Shumi Bose, and designers Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath (OK-RM). Image © REAL

A Kickstarter campaign recently launched by Jack Self and Shumi Bose of the Real Estate Architecture Laboratory (REAL) has reached its funding target in only twenty days. Produced by an independent team of editors and designers, this bi-monthly magazine intends to "revive the review as a writing form" to a general readership within the architectural sphere and its orbital subjects, with a particular focus on politics and economics. Their campaign has so far seen considerable support from the architectural community and beyond — testament to their 'no-ads policy' and dedication to paying their contributors.

In a statement to those who have pledged so far, the editors have said that "the Real Review will happen, and it is directly and completely due to your commitment, your vision and your generosity. We can’t thank you enough for getting us here!" They are now looking to surpass this crowdfunded milestone, with Kickstarter remaining the only way to subscribe.

dRMM Submits Plans for a New Maggie's Centre in Oldham

04:00 - 6 October, 2015
Model of proposed Maggie's Centre in Oldham, UK. Image © dRMM
Model of proposed Maggie's Centre in Oldham, UK. Image © dRMM

London-based practice dRMM have submitted plans for a new Maggie's Centre in Oldham, a metropolitan area north east of Manchester. Maggie's, a UK charity famed for its cancer care centres, is also well known for commissioning world-renowned architects to design their spaces. This latest proposal will be sited within the grounds of the Royal Oldham Hospital, becoming the second centre of its kind in Greater Manchester following Foster + Partners' current project in central Manchester.

RIBA Future Trends Survey for August 2015 Shows Pause after Optimistic Summer

06:00 - 1 October, 2015
via RIBA
via RIBA

The RIBA Future Trends Survey for August 2015 showed signs of slowing after indications of growth for architects during the summer. The RIBA Future Trends Workload Index dropped one point to +21.

Kickstarter Campaign Launches to Fund the Forthcoming 'Real Review'

11:25 - 29 September, 2015

The Real Estate Architecture Laboratory (REAL) have today announced a Kickstarter campaign in preparation for the launch of their flagship publication, the Real Review. Produced by an independent team of editors and designers, this bi-monthly magazine intends to "revive the review as a writing form" to a general readership within the architectural sphere and its orbital subjects.

The Real Review will be "a printed object of exceptional quality, featuring engaging texts by leading international commentators," alongside providing "a highly visible platform for emerging writers." Confirmed authors at this time include, among others, Assemble, Pier Vittorio Aureli (Dogma, AA), Reinier de Graaf (OMA), Sam Jacob (Sam Jacob Studio), and a rostra of journalists including the Financial Times' architecture critic Edwin Heathcote.

Grayson Perry, Martha Thorne and Bjarke Ingels Among the RIBA's 2016 Honorary Fellowships

04:00 - 25 September, 2015
P+R De Uithof, Utrecht / KCAP led by Kees Christiaanse, Honorary International Fellow. Image © Ronald Tilleman
P+R De Uithof, Utrecht / KCAP led by Kees Christiaanse, Honorary International Fellow. Image © Ronald Tilleman

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) have announced fourteen 2016 RIBA Honorary Fellowships (of whom two are in partnership) and eight International Fellowships which will be awarded at an event on the 1st February 2016, alongside the recently announced RIBA Royal Gold Medal. RIBA Honorary Fellowships are awarded annually to people who have made "a particular contribution to architecture in its broadest sense," be it in the fields of architecture, construction, media, education, or the arts.

RIBA Awards 2016 Royal Gold Medal to Zaha Hadid

05:20 - 24 September, 2015
Zaha Hadid, recipient of the 2016 RIBA Gold Medal. Image © Mary McCartney
Zaha Hadid, recipient of the 2016 RIBA Gold Medal. Image © Mary McCartney

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) have revealed that Dame Zaha Hadid will receive the 2016 Royal Gold Medal — the first sole woman to be awarded the UK's highest honour for architects in her own right. Previous female winners (Sheila O’Donnell in 2015, Patty Hopkins in 1994, and Ray Eames in 1979) were each recognised alongside their husbands and practice partners.

Given in recognition of a lifetime’s work, the RIBA Royal Gold Medal is approved personally by Her Majesty The Queen and is awarded to those who have had a significant influence "either directly or indirectly on the advancement of architecture." Other notable Royal Gold Medallists include Frank Gehry (2000), Lord Norman Foster, Baron of Thames Bank (1983), Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1959), Le Corbusier (1953), and Frank Lloyd Wright (1941). The medallists' names are engraved into the marble wall at the RIBA's headquarters in London.

Herzog & de Meuron's Tate Modern Expansion to Officially Open in 2016

04:00 - 23 September, 2015
The new expansion to the Tate Modern. Image © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron
The new expansion to the Tate Modern. Image © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

Earlier this week Sir Nicholas Serota, director of the Tate Modern, announced that Herzog & de Meuron's extension will officially open on Friday 17th June 2016. The gallery, which originally opened in 2000 housed within a former power station in London's Bankside, dramatically transformed the UK's relationship with modern and contemporary art. Since then, the Tate Modern has become a bastion of trend-setting and high-profile exhibitions, and has grown to be one of London's most visited cultural venues.

Should Victorian-era Architecture be "Saved at all Costs"?

04:10 - 22 September, 2015
The height of Gothic Revival: the Palace of Westminster (also known as the Houses of Parliament), London. Image © David Hunt
The height of Gothic Revival: the Palace of Westminster (also known as the Houses of Parliament), London. Image © David Hunt

Empathetic historicism and romanticising older buildings has become an ever-common sentiment in modern Britain. In an article for the British daily The Telegraph, Stephen Bayley tackles this trend by questioning whether Victorian-era architecture is actually all worth saving? Victorian architecture, so called because it was implemented under the reign of Queen Victoria, was stylistically preoccupied by Gothic Revival — an attempt by architects and commissioners to impose a 'pure', chivalrous unifying aesthetic designed to instill a sense of civic importance and reaffirm a social hierarchy. Yet "their architecture," according to Bayley, "has an inclination to ugliness that defies explanation by the shifting tides of tastes."

Jonathan Tuckey Design Create Residential Interiors for Post-Industrial Gasholders

04:00 - 21 September, 2015
Interior sketch. Image © Jonathan Tuckey Design
Interior sketch. Image © Jonathan Tuckey Design

London-based British practice Jonathan Tuckey Design (JTD) have created a series of residential interiors for the 'Gasholder Triplets' in London's formerly industrial King's Cross district. 145 individual apartments have been designed inside these mid-nineteenth century structures, within which Wilkinson Eyre Architects have created the "architectural insertions" (the buildings themselves).

Grimshaw Reveal Vision for a High-Speed Concourse at London's Euston Station

04:00 - 11 September, 2015
HS2 Southern Entrance. Image © Grimshaw
HS2 Southern Entrance. Image © Grimshaw

Grimshaw Architects, in collaboration with Arup, have revealed renderings for their proposed 25,000 square metre High Speed Two (HS2) railway terminal at Euston Station, in north London. They have developed an "incremental staged design" that will allow for the construction of the new high speed station while maintaining all existing services. Fronted by a 38 metre glazed façade, the new entrances will transform the internal circulation spaces into a "light and airy destination with shops, restaurants, and cafés."

British Architect Jonathan Woolf Dies Aged 54

04:10 - 8 September, 2015
Painted House / Jonathan Woolf architects with Bharat Patel. Image © Helene Binet
Painted House / Jonathan Woolf architects with Bharat Patel. Image © Helene Binet

According to the Architects' Journal Jonathan Woolf, "the much-respected architect and academic" born and based in London, has died aged 54. His practice, Jonathan Woolf Architects, was established in 1990 and has completed more than thirty-five projects in Europe and Africa. Woolf was also a prolific educator, having taught at the British universities of Bath, Kingston (from which he received an honorary doctorate earlier this year), the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, and the Architectural Association.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Shows Dip in Workload and Staffing Forecasts

06:00 - 2 September, 2015
Courtesy of RIBA
Courtesy of RIBA

The Royal Institute of British Architect (RIBA)'s Future Trends Survey results for July 2015 present a note of caution for architecture practices with a fall in both workload and staffing forecasts. However, optimism remains as staffing levels are higher than a year ago. Despite June’s record-high forecast, July 2015 saw a downturn in the RIBA Future Trends Workload Index from +44 to +22. Even so, practices reported an overall increase in workload at an annual rate of 8%, and staffing levels 6% higher than in 2014.

Crowdfunding Campaign Begins for Homeless Shelter Pods

08:00 - 23 August, 2015
Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of James Furzer
Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of James Furzer

After winning the 6th annual Space for New Visions competition by FAKRO last month, James Furzer of Spatial Design Architects has begun a crowdfunding campaign on Indigogo for his project, “Homes for the Homeless”. The project proposes a series of modular pods which attach to existing buildings, providing a safe space for a night’s rest for the homeless. Extending beyond mere habitation, James Furzer hopes to change the way that the public sees the homeless – of which there are over 750 on any given night in London alone.

Arup Design a 'Sky Pool' Suspended 35 Metres Above London's Nine Elms

04:00 - 21 August, 2015
The 'Sky Pool' will be suspended 35 metres above ground level. Image © Hayes Davidson
The 'Sky Pool' will be suspended 35 metres above ground level. Image © Hayes Davidson

A twenty five metre long, ten storey high suspended swimming pool—dubbed the 'Sky Pool'—has been planned for the second phase of a new high-end residential development in the London district of Nine Elms, next to the new Embassy of the United States. The pool is part of two buildings, designed by London-based practice HAL and part of a complex of 2000 homes developed Ireland's Ballymore Group. The water will be held in suspension by just twenty centimetres of "structure free" transparent glass, and will connect two housing blocks together. Alongside a rooftop bar, orangery and spa, a second connection between the two is also planned in the form of a footbridge.

Preston Bus Station: What Does the Winning Proposal Say About Open-Call Competitions?

04:00 - 20 August, 2015
Preston Bus Station (1969). Image via BDP
Preston Bus Station (1969). Image via BDP

In 2013, following a number of campaigns, a 1969 Brutalist icon in the northern British city of Preston was listed. The future of this bus terminal—one of the largest in the UK and the biggest in Europe when it originally opened—was, until last month, a matter of considerable speculation and debate. This week the results of an international open-call competition for proposals transforming into a new youth centre were revealed, selecting the proposal of New York based practice John Puttick Associates as 'the best of the lot.' The 'lot', however, left something to be desired.

Rowan Moore on the "Quiet Revolution in British Housing"

04:10 - 18 August, 2015
Derbishire Place, London / Níall McLaughlin Architects. Image © Nick Kane
Derbishire Place, London / Níall McLaughlin Architects. Image © Nick Kane

In a recent article for The Observer, Rowan Moore discusses what he describes as the "quiet revolution in British housing." In compiling a list of practices and collectives from the recent past and present, he has created a compendium of people and organisations who he believes are creating exemplary dwellings in the UK. Noting that the British housing stock is not necessarily in the best shape (a symptom of the 1970s), Moore ultimately offers an optimistic message tinged with words of caution.

Recently Formed New York Practice Wins Competition to Reimagine Preston Bus Station

04:00 - 17 August, 2015
Winning Proposal. Image Courtesy of John Puttick Associates
Winning Proposal. Image Courtesy of John Puttick Associates

Following the announcement in 2013 that Preston Bus Station, a Brutalist icon designed by BDP in 1969, had been Grade II Listed and therefore saved from the threat of demolition, the results of a recent international ideas competition to consider its future as a youth centre have been revealed. John Puttick Associates, based in New York, have beaten competition from Flanagan Lawrence, Letts Wheeler Architects, Sane Architecture, and local practice Cassidy + Ashton with their proposal to meet "the challenge of sensitively introducing contemporary design to the existing setting." Over 4200 people voted for their favourite design at an exhibition held in the bus station itself and through and online mechanism, and "were taken into account by the judges when making their final decision."

99% Invisible Explores Brutalism, From London to Boston

04:00 - 12 August, 2015

In the latest episode of 99% Invisible, Hard to Love a Brute, Roman Mars and Avery Trufelman take a look at the potted history of the "hulking concrete brutes" of post-war Europe, centring on the UK, and the US east coast. Exploring Ernö Goldfinger's Balfron and Trellick towers, while making a pitstop in Boston, MA, this twenty minute podcast examines why people "love to hate" Brutalism and why, "as harsh as it looks, concrete is an utterly optimistic building material."