Toshiko Mori Calls Tokyo’s At-Risk Hotel Okura “A Very Beautiful Orphan Child”

Lighting and textures #HotelOkura #architecture #archdaily #interiors #instagood #japan #MyMomentAtOkura

A photo posted by ArchDaily (@archdaily) on

With the planned demolition of Hotel Okura in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games fast approaching, architects and designers have rallied around the Modernist icon, calling for its preservation. In the latest and most high profile campaign, Japanese architect Toshiko Mori and Bottega Veneta’s Tomas Maier have joined forces to span a breadth of platforms from a symposium held last November to an Instagram hashtag (#mymomentatokura) sharing images of the beloved hotel. Most recently, Mori sat down with Architectural Digest to discuss her passion for Hotel Okura, the origins of the campaign, and Japanese Modernism. Read the full interview and see why Mori says Hotel Okura is “a very beautiful orphan child,” here.

New Artist Residency In Senegal / Toshiko Mori

© Iwan Baan

Architects: Toshiko Mori
Location: Sinthian,
Year: 2015
Photographs: Iwan Baan, Courtesy of Josef and Anni Albers Foundation

Ruins of an Alternate Future (Jinhua Architecture Park)

Courtesy of 

Originally published on the author’s website and blog on Archinect, ‘Ruins of an Alternate Future ()’ was written by Shanghai-based architectural designer and theorist Evan Chakroff

One of the great, if seldom realized, promises of architecture is its capacity to affect change. The best architects seem to have this potential in mind constantly as they structure career-length narratives around the social impact that good design can achieve. While this is often hyperbole, and most projects are driven by functional or economic considerations, there is the occasional opportunity for artists and architects to create purely speculative work, where radical departures from established typologies suggest alternatives to the status quo. In these rare cases, novelty is embraced not for its own sake, but for its potential to generate new archetypes, to provide a glimpse into a parallel world where architecture truly has agency: where design can change society for the better. 

Continue reading after the break…

Women in Architecture: Toshiko Mori presents her work

, FAIA, founder and principal of Toshiko Mori Architect, discusses her work, including the Darwin D. Martin House Visitors Center. The lecture begins with a 15 minute documentary “A Girl is a Fellow Here: 100 Women Architects in the Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright”, produced by the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation.

“Toshiko Mori: Role Models and Paradigm Shift: Frank, Paul, Marcel and Me,” part of the Women of Architecture series, is a collaboration between the National Building Museum and the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation to celebrate Women’s History Month.

Reference: DI, National Building Museum