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Peter Zumthor Selected to Design Beyeler Foundation Expansion

14:00 - 15 September, 2016
Peter Zumthor Selected to Design Beyeler Foundation Expansion, Beyeler Foundation, 1997 / Renzo Piano Building Workshop. Image © Fran Parente
Beyeler Foundation, 1997 / Renzo Piano Building Workshop. Image © Fran Parente

The office of Peter Zumthor has been selected to design an expansion to the Beyeler Foundation, located just outside Zumthor’s childhood home of Basel, Switzerland. The Swiss architect was chosen from a prestigious shortlist of 11 firms to add to the existing museum building, designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and completed in 1997.

“The sky above Basel, the city and its surroundings–those are the landscapes of my youth,” said Zumthor. “It is heart-warming to be able to design a major building here.”

Zumthor's LACMA Design Suspended in a Rainbow of Fabric at the 2016 Venice Biennale

12:25 - 22 August, 2016
Zumthor's LACMA Design Suspended in a Rainbow of Fabric at the 2016 Venice Biennale, © Danica O. Kus
© Danica O. Kus

At the 2016 Venice Biennale, Peter Zumthor has put his designs for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) on display for the professional community. Inside the Arsenale building, a model of the tar-pit-inspired building has been suspended to float within a curving display of textile artworks by Christina Kim, while a soundtrack by Walter De Maria – “Ocean Music,” written in 1968 – provides a rhythmic backdrop for the installation.

Continue for more on the exhibit, featuring images by photographer Danica O. Kus.

© Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus +12

Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing

09:30 - 18 August, 2016
Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing, Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects
Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects

For Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki and David J. Lewis, the section “is often understood as a reductive drawing type, produced at the end of the design process to depict structural and material conditions in service of the construction contract.” A definition that will be familiar to most of those who have studied or worked in architecture at some point. We often think primarily of the plan, for it allows us to embrace the programmatic expectations of a project and provide a summary of the various functions required. In the modern age, digital modelling software programs offer ever more possibilities when it comes to creating complex three dimensional objects, making the section even more of an afterthought.

With their Manual of Section, the three founding partners of LTL architects engage with section as an essential tool of architectural design, and let’s admit it, this reading might change your mind on the topic. For the co-authors, “thinking and designing through section requires the building of a discourse about section, recognizing it as a site of intervention.” Perhaps, indeed, we need to understand the capabilities of section drawings both to use them more efficiently and to enjoy doing so.

Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon (1976). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects Notre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier (1954). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects United States Pavilion at Expo '67 by Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao (1967). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (1959). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects +15

New Renderings Released of Peter Zumthor's LACMA Design

12:05 - 5 August, 2016
New Renderings Released of Peter Zumthor's LACMA Design, Aerial View. Image Courtesy of LACMA
Aerial View. Image Courtesy of LACMA

The office of Peter Zumthor has released new renderings of their design for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s $600 million new home on Museum Row in Los Angeles. The images provide the first look into the museum interior and gallery spaces, and present the museum in its nearly-finalized design. From this point, Zumthor has stated, "it is only going to be small alterations."

View from Japanese Pavilion. Image Courtesy of LACMA View from "Urban Light". Image Courtesy of LACMA Underside view. Image Courtesy of LACMA "Meander" Gallery Perspective. Image Courtesy of LACMA +11

LACMA Steadily Raises Funds for Peter Zumthor's Campus Overhaul

12:00 - 4 May, 2016
LACMA Steadily Raises Funds for Peter Zumthor's Campus Overhaul, © Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner
© Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has announced two gifts totaling $75 million dollars, bringing the museum’s Peter Zumthor designed campus overhaul one step closer to reality, reports the Los Angeles Times. Elaine Wynn, one of the world’s top art collectors, has pledged $50 million dollars, and former Univision chairman A. Jerrold Perenchio has promised $25 million, bringing the total funds raised and approved to $275 million, just shy of halfway to the $600 million required for the project.

Spotlight: Peter Zumthor

02:30 - 26 April, 2016
Spotlight: Peter Zumthor, The Therme Vals. Image © Flickr user rowenaoscura licensed under CC BY 2.0
The Therme Vals. Image © Flickr user rowenaoscura licensed under CC BY 2.0

Known for his sensuous materiality and attention to place, 2009 Pritzker Laureate Peter Zumthor (born April 26, 1943) is one the most revered architects of the 21st century. Shooting to fame on the back of The Therme Vals and Kunsthaus Bregenz, completed just a year apart in 1996 and 1997, his work privileges the experiential qualities of individual buildings over the technological, cultural and theoretical focus often favored by his contemporaries.

Video: 7 Architects On What Makes Global Architecture Work

15:00 - 21 January, 2016

Doing architecture is listening. - Norman Foster

Peter Zumthor, Jean Nouvel, Norman Foster, Diébédo Francis Kéré and three other great architects come together in this Louisiana Channel video to share their thoughts on how to design for different cultures. For most of them, understanding context, collaborating with locals and using architecture to address larger social issues are what makes global architecture a success. 

Louis Becker, Kjetil Trædal Thorsen and Kunlé Adeyemi also share their insights in the video above - "Bridging Cultures in a Global World."

How Peter Zumthor and His Protégé Gloria Cabral Built a Connection Beyond Language

09:30 - 5 December, 2015
How Peter Zumthor and His Protégé Gloria Cabral Built a Connection Beyond Language, Cabral examines a model of the tea chapel. Image Courtesy of Gloria Cabral and Peter Zumthor/Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative
Cabral examines a model of the tea chapel. Image Courtesy of Gloria Cabral and Peter Zumthor/Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative

In May last year, the Rolex Mentors & Protégés initiative announced a surprising partnership in its name: Paraguayan architect Gloria Gabral was to spend a year working alongside the famously elusive Swiss master Peter Zumthor. The differences between the two architects - from the languages they spoke to the age of their respective careers - were obvious from the outset. But as explored in this article by Paul Clemence, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Intuitive Connection," over the past year they've been discovering that the things that they have in common run far deeper.

It was an unlikely pair. He is a well-established architect with a long career, working out of a small town tucked deep in the mountainous Graubünden canton in Switzerland; she is at the beginning of a promising career in Asunción, Paraguay’s capital and largest city. They did not even share a common language, yet they connected through something more binding than the spoken word: an intuitive sense of space—and their work ethic.

Peter Zumthor: “There’s Nothing I’m Not Interested In”

12:00 - 30 November, 2015

The Louisiana Channel recently made a trip to the hometown of Peter Zumthor for an extensive and rare video interview on the Swiss architect's life journey, passion for learning, and how "different kinds of silence" help him reach his potential. 

Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

09:30 - 9 November, 2015
Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

In the mid-1980s, after literature had long been held hostage by postmodernist irony and cynicism, a new wave of authors called for an end to negativity, promoting a "new sincerity" for fiction. Gaining momentum into the 1990s, the movement reached a pinnacle in 1993 when, in his essay E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction, pop-culture seer David Foster Wallace, a proponent of this "new sincerity," made the following call to action: “The next real literary ‘rebels’ in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles... These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the ‘Oh how banal.'"

Architecture, ever in debt to the styles and ideas of other art forms, could learn a thing or two now from the resuscitation of American fiction at the turn of the millennium. It too is enduring an identity crisis, mired by pessimism and uncertainty - a reality made painfully clear this past January when a New York Times Op-Ed by Steven Bingler and Martin C. Pedersen, How to Rebuild Architecture, divided camps and made the design world fume. In the editorial, the authors spoke vehemently of an architectural profession that has become mired by egos and been disconnected from public needs. Things quickly got ugly, critics wrestled with critics and subsequently the public got involved. What no one seemed to take into account is that this type of hounding is at the core of the problem. In its current landscape the discipline has struggled with its past, been deferential to its present, and wrestled with the uncertainty of its future. In a moment when we have become addicted to despondency, can anyone win?

Zumthor and Mendes da Rocha Join AMERICAnodelsud Conference in Paraguay

16:00 - 26 March, 2015
Zumthor and Mendes da Rocha Join AMERICAnodelsud Conference in Paraguay

AMERICAnodelsud is an organization committed to social equality, promoting investigations and the development of new knowledge within the field of architecture. One of their main objectives is to raise funds to sponsor projects that will bridge the social exclusion gap.

Architects Alejandro Aravena (Santiago, Chile), Solano Benitez (Asuncion, Paraguay), Angelo Bucci (Sao Paulo, Brazil), Rafael Iglesia (Rosario, Argentina), José María Saez (Quito, Ecuador) and Ricardo Sargiotti (Córdoba, Argentina) held the first convention in 2013. Through the 'america[no] del sur' tour, which consisted of three conferences held in different cities in Argentina, they sought to raise the necessary funding.

On April 15th and 17th, Asunción, Paraguay will host the upcoming fundraiser, which Peter Zumthor and Paulo Mendes da Rocha have already agreed to attend in order to support the cause. Without a doubt, the presence of these two internationally-renowned architects will greatly help raise the funds needed by AMERICAnodelsud to follow through with their commitment. 

Read AMERICAnodelsud's charter for this year's edition, written by Solano Benitez, below. 

Jurors Deny Support of Morphosis’ Vals Hotel Appointment

00:00 - 12 February, 2015
Jurors Deny Support of Morphosis’ Vals Hotel Appointment , Therme Vals / Peter Zumthor. Image © CC Flickr User Richard Tucker
Therme Vals / Peter Zumthor. Image © CC Flickr User Richard Tucker

A group of five high-profile jurors, lead by Louisa Hutton of Berlin-based Sauerbruch Hutton, have issued a statement through the Swiss Society of Engineers and Architects (SIA) denying any support of Morphosis’ appointment to design the 7132 Hotel in Vals, Switzerland. According to reports, the jury had “significant question marks” regarding the chosen design, ultimately leading to the high-profile competition’s termination when the jury failed to recommend a winner. This seems to be a result of the client and jury’s inability to find common ground. 

Video: Bach Comes to Life within the Walls of Peter Zumthor's Bruder Klaus Field Chapel

00:00 - 28 October, 2014

Take a moment to enjoy German-Korean musician Isang Enders play Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 within the sacred, charred interior of Peter Zumthor’s Bruder Klaus Field Chapel.

Peter Zumthor & LACMA Unveil Revised Museum Design

00:00 - 7 July, 2014
Peter Zumthor & LACMA Unveil Revised Museum Design, Model of the new design. Image © Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner
Model of the new design. Image © Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner

Peter Zumthor and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) have revealed a revised design for the museum's $650 million new home on Museum Row in Los Angeles. The new design still features the sinuous glass and grey concrete slab raised a full story off the ground, but under the new proposal part of the museum would bridge Wilshire Boulevard to touch down on what is currently a car park opposite.

The change comes in response to criticisms that the previous design would put the neighboring La Brea Tar Pits at risk, threatening their status as an active paleontological research site and a popular tourist destination. The shape of the new design removes this risk by withdrawing from the boundary with the adjacent tar pits, without compromising on floor space in the museum.

More on the revised design after the break

Render of the view West along Wilshire Boulevard. Image © Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner Render of the view East along Wilshire Boulevard. Image © Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner Model (image taken from model of original design). Image © 2013 Museum Associates / LACMA Model (image taken from model of original design). Image © 2013 Museum Associates / LACMA +8

Peter Zumthor Selects Paraguayan Architect Gloria Cabral as Protégé

00:00 - 22 May, 2014
Peter Zumthor Selects Paraguayan Architect Gloria Cabral as Protégé, Peter Zumthor with protege Gloria Cabral. Image Courtesy of Rolex Mentor and Protege Arts Initiative
Peter Zumthor with protege Gloria Cabral. Image Courtesy of Rolex Mentor and Protege Arts Initiative

Peter Zumthor has chosen to mentor Paraguayan architect Gloria Cabral as part of the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative. Cabral, a partner at Asuncion-based Gabinete de Arquitectura, will spend a year collaborating with the Swiss architect, who has dedicated his expertise in an effort to learn, create and grow with the young talent.

Describing Cabral’s work to reveal an original spirit, Zumthor stated: “In Gloria’s work and attitude I sense a keen interest in the physical experience of architecture, which makes it exciting for me to collaborate with her.”

OASE #91: "Building Atmosphere" With Peter Zumthor and Juhani Pallasmaa

00:00 - 14 January, 2014
OASE #91: "Building Atmosphere" With Peter Zumthor and Juhani Pallasmaa, Courtesy of OASE
Courtesy of OASE

In OASE's 91st editionBuilding Atmospheres, the elusive craft of creating, capturing and understanding 'atmosphere' in architecture is explored in a carefully chosen collection of themed essays by Peter ZumthorJuhani Pallasmaa and philosopher Gernot Böhme. Zumthor, famous for his 1996 text Atmospheres, identifies and discusses "a series of themes that play a role in his work in achieving architectonic atmosphere". Alongside this, the OASE team have visited his studio and interviewed him about the current relevance of his writing and how he captures 'atmosphere' in his design process. 

Material Inspiration: 10 Projects Inspired by Wood

01:00 - 11 December, 2013
Material Inspiration: 10 Projects Inspired by Wood

To celebrate the launch of ArchDaily Materials, our new product catalog, we've rounded up 10 awesome projects from around the world that were inspired by one material: wood. Check out the projects after the break...

Peter Zumthor: Seven Personal Observations on Presence In Architecture

01:00 - 3 December, 2013
Peter Zumthor: Seven Personal Observations on Presence In Architecture , Zumthor in Tel Aviv. Image © Yael Engelhart for Ha'aretz
Zumthor in Tel Aviv. Image © Yael Engelhart for Ha'aretz

Known for his superior design and unparalleled craftsmanship, the 2009 Pritzker Laureate and 2013 RIBA Gold Medal Award winner, Peter Zumthor, was recently invited to speak at the School of Architecture in Tel Aviv University. In a lecture titled “Presence in Architecture - Seven Personal Observations,” Zumthor shared some of the inspirations behind his greatest projects, giving us insight into his poetic, intelligent, (and some might say) “nearly divine” mind.

Zumthor’s Seven Points on “Presence,” after the break...

Saint Benedict Chapel. Image Courtesy of Felipe Camus http://www.archdaily.com/419367/. Image Courtesy of Felipe Camus Brauder Klaus Field Chapel. Image © Samuel Ludwig © Jose Fernando Vazquez +20