Insects and Humans Harmonize in a Symphony of Architectural Sound in this Roman Installation

Courtesy of OFL Architecture

Within the walls of OFL Architecture‘s open-air wooden , the term “built environment” truly earns its keep. In Wunderbugs, humans become spectators of the natural world as insects toil away in six spherical ecosystems, and sensors weave movements into a web of data. Upon entering the pavilion, visitors are transformed into components of an interactive soundtrack harvested from the sensors and broadcast in the space, uniting the insect and human experience. The project was conceived for the second annual Maker Faire Europe in Rome, where it was installed earlier this month.

Enter the interactive acoustic experience of Wonderbugs after the break.

Scandinavian Design Group and Ctrl+N Create an Undulating Interactive Installation for Lundin Norway

Waves of golden light appear to shimmer and float from the ceiling in “Breaking the Surface” a new interactive from Scandinavian Design Groupctrl+n, Abida, Pivot Product Design and Intek. The kinetic sculpture is composed of an array of acrylic plastic tubes extending through the floor of a two-story mechanized matrix, gracefully moving above and below the surface to evoke abstract images of the undersea geography. Read more about the interactive installation after the break.

Orizzontale Illuminates Outdoor Theater with Recycled Keg Wall at MAXXI

© Musacchio Ianniello, courtesy Fondazione MAXXI

Orizzontale, winners of the 2014 Young Architects Program (YAP), have transformed the MAXXI’s piazza Boetti with an “8 1/2” meter-tall mobile theater made of timber and recycled beer kegs. Built in just four weeks, the created an “urban room” for the museum’s Play with YAP events program that provided an inhabitable podium illuminated by a translucent wall of lighted plastic beer kegs for a series of concerts and events.

More about Orizzontale’s design, after the break. 

Luftwerk to Illuminate Mies’ Farnsworth House this Weekend

© Kate Joyce, Courtesy of

Starting tomorrow (October 17), Chicago-based artists Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero of Luftwerk will be transforming Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House into a “canvas of light and sound” with the digital installation, INsite. “An exploration of the philosophy of Mies through light,” INsite will offer an entirely new nighttime experience at the Plano residence that highlights the architecture’s famed characteristics with an interactive light show pulsating to the original “sonic exploration” of Owen Clay Condon.

A video preview of the installation, after the break.

8,000 Illuminated Balloons to Mark 9-Mile Stretch of Berlin Wall

Lichtgrenze (rendering) via the Chicago Tribune

25 years ago on November 9, East German protesters torn down the Berlin Wall. To commemorate this moment, the German capital plans to line the wall’s original 9-mile stretch with 8,000 illuminated, white balloons. The , named lichtgrenze or “light frontier,” will be open November 7. On the 9th, the balloons will be simultaneously released into the air to music provided by the Staatskapelle orchestra.

Video: Three Writers On Olafur Eliasson’s Riverbed

In this video from the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art‘s Lousiana Channel, three acclaimed writers – Sjón, James McBride and Daniel Kehlmann – talk about their experience of Olafur Eliasson’s Indoor Riverbed at the Danish museum. Sjón describes how he felt when he saw 180 tons of rock from his home country of Iceland filling the room, saying “It was like a moment in a dream, when you enter a room and something is not right, but familiar.”

The writers reflect on the role of art itself, as Sjón states ”If art is to give answers at all, it should be confusing answers.” Watch the full video to learn more about how the impacts its viewers and successfully blurs the lines between art and nature.

“Tesseract” Explores Higher-Dimensional Geometry at Bordeaux’s Semaine Digitale

©

As part of the Semaine Digitale, in October Bordaux will host 1024 Architecture‘s Tesseract, an inspired by the so called “four-dimensional cube.” Created from no more than ordinary scaffolding, a translucent fabric skin and a series of electronically controlled lights, the installation plays with complex geometrical compositions, as the light beams rapidly create and deconstruct shapes within the outer 10 metre cubic frame.

More on the installation, and 1024 Architecture, after the break

Get Swinging in Boston on these Glowing LED Hoops

Courtesy of Howeler + Yoon Architecture

In Boston, playgrounds are no longer just for kids. Twenty LED-lit circular swings have been installed outdoors as a part of “Swing Time,” ’s first interactive installation. The hanging, glowing orbs are a twist on traditional rubber-and-rope swings, dangling from a minimal steel structure similar to those used in conventional playgrounds. LED lights embedded in the swings activate and change color as each swing moves, returning to a dim white light when static. The piece is designed to blend Boston’s design community with its expanding technology sector while playfully engaging residents.

Take a seat in “Swing Time” with more photos and info after the break.

INABA to Construct “New York Light”

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Jeffrey Inaba’s Brooklyn practice INABA has been selected as the first-ever winner in the Flatiron Plaza Holiday Design Competition with New York Light. Organized by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and , the inaugural installation will be constructed in front of the famous Flatiron Building for the duration of the 2014 winter season.

This Whimsical Cage Redefines Public Space

Courtesy of

Folly is a word not often used in architecture. By definition, ‘folly’ is a lack of good sense, or foolishness. And in the realm of architecture, folly is used to describe an extravagantly ornamented structure with no practical purpose. Yet gathering their inspiration from this word, Warren Techentin Architecture (WTARCH) have created and mounted a functional folly, appropriately named La Cage aux Folles (The Cage of Follies). Constructed of painted, steel tubes and installed at Materials & Applications, an centre in Los Angeles, La Cage aux Folles played host to an array of musical performances and lectures. 

Explore La Cage aux Folles with more photos and info after the break. 

Move Over, Green Walls: Living Canopy Comes to West Vancouver

Courtesy of Matthew Soules Architecture

Imagine walking beneath an illuminated canopy of lush greenery, in the form of inverted pyramids sculpted to perfection. In early August 2014 visitors were welcomed by this succulent living roof to the Harmony Arts Festival in West Vancouver, British Columbia. Guests were guided through the fairgrounds beneath the 90-foot long canopy, creating an immersive sensory experience befitting the interdisciplinary creative arts festival. Designed by Matthew Soules Architecture and curated by the Museum of West VancouverVermilion Sands was created as a temporary for the ten day festival.

Submerge yourself in Vermilion Sands with photos and more info after the break.

Translating Smiljan Radić’s Serpentine Pavilion from Fantasy to Fabrication

The use of fiberglass allowed for the to be thin and brittle, but also had the strength to span a large face. The pigment made it fire retardant. Image Courtesy of Louis Webb Bird/AECOM

Settled neatly in the quiet hum of London‘s Gardens rests Smiljan Radić‘s 2014 Serpentine Pavilion, an ethereal mass of carefully moulded fiberglass punctuated by precisely cut openings. Radić desired a structure that appears thin and brittle, yet was strong enough to support itself, and his affection for the rudimental layered qualities of papier-mâché – his maquette medium of choice – inspired the use of fiberglass by AECOM, who engineered Radić’s wild ideas. In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as “Paper-Thin Walls, an AECOM engineer explains their solution. Read on after the break to find out more. 

Olafur Eliasson Creates an Indoor Riverbed at Danish Museum

Courtesy of

Blurring the boundaries between the Natural world and the Manmade in one wide, sweeping gesture, Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson‘s first solo exhibit, aptly titled Riverbed, brings the Outdoors in.

Recreating an enormous, ruggedly enchanting landscape, complete with riverbed and rocky earth, the artist draws heavily from site-specific inspiration. The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art‘s location on the Danish coast lends a raw, elemental and powerful character that extends into the building as a major intervention, transforming into a work of art.

Ryo Yamada’s Installation Connects Garden Goers to the Sky

Courtesy of

Ryo Yamada‘s “Air Garden” is a passage, but not in the traditional sense of the word. It’s not a passage that connects one point to another, since the walkway does not lead to a tangible destination, but rather a passage that connects an enclosed garden to the vastness of the open sky. The artist believes everyone shares a common desire for the sky, which represents freedom and equality. Read on after the break for more information, images and a video.

Performance Space: Marina Abramović at the Serpentine Gallery

© Marco Anelli

One of the latest installations at London’s Serpentine Gallery, where Smiljan Radic recently unveiled an ethereal pavilion, is Marina Abramović’s performance installation entitled 512 Hours. Creating what has been described as “the simplest of settings” in one of the gallery’s large spaces, the artwork employs Abramović’s most frequently used material: herself. Coupled with the audience and a selection of common objects, the constantly changing sequence of events on display is the very first live installation by the artist displayed in the . Upon arrival, visitors are asked leave their baggage (including mobile phones, cameras and any other electronic equipment) behind in order to enter the exhibition. Find out more about what you can expect from it here.

Users Create the Color in this Super-Sized Kaleidoscope

Courtesy of

2013 KOBE Biennale visitors had the opportunity to experience the magic of a kaleidoscope in a whole new way thanks to Saya Miyazaki and Masakazu Shiranes’ award-winning installation. The psychedelic polyhedral installation was designed for the Art Container Contest, which challenged participants to create interesting environments within the confines of a single . As visitors meandered through the installation, they became active participants – rather than passive observers – in the kaleidoscope’s constantly changing appearance. For more images and information, continue after the break.

Kotaro Horiuchi Architecture’s Installation of Floating, Perforated Membranes

© Issei Mori

Japanese firm Kotaro Horiuchi Architecture‘s “Fusionner 1.0″ was on display this past March at the White Gallery Cube in Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. The consisted of two horizontal floating membranes stretched across a simple rectilinear room, dividing the space vertically into three sections.

Bekkering Adams Create Hanging Installation in Venice

© Jeroen Musch

Dutch practice Bekkering Adams Architecten, in cooperation with ABT and BeersNielsen, recently unveiled an at the Palazzo Mora, as part of a collateral event with this year’s Venice Biennale. Entitled Form-ContraForm, the sculptural piece reflects on the conceptual and human perception of space – something which they describe as “a space that surrounds and envelops.” Distilling architecture’s fundamentals (which is also the theme of this year’s Biennale) down to the definition of co-ordinates in space, the experience created by Bekkering Adams is akin to the notion of “the mass versus the cavity.”