Faculty Install Grid Structure for SUTD Open House

Courtesy of SUTD

Associate professor Toni Kotnik and assistant professor Carlos Bañón have collaborated on the design of an exhibition platform for the 2015 SUTD Open House. Held in early, the exhibition was the main showcase for the department of Architecture and Sustainable Design at the Singapore University of Technology and Design.

Contrasting the neutrality of the white exhibition space, Kotnik and Bañón’s design used 200 wooden studs, each 1-meter in length and configured into a modular grid system. The structure was supported by 16 oxidised steel tripods that add both stability and a visual density to the platform. Both Kotnik and Bañón are faculty members at the University of Technolgoy and Design, with particular interests in architecture and sustainable design. More images after the break.

Carsten Höller’s Giant Slides Return to London

Image via BBC

German artist Carsten Höller is returning to London with plans for two new giant slides to be built at the this Summer. As part of his exhibition “Decision,” Holler will provide visitors with a two-slide exit option that will (hopefully) induce an “emotional state that is a unique condition somewhere between delight and madness.”

“[Holler] is “one of the world’s most thought-provoking and profoundly playful artists, with a sharp and mischievous intelligence bent on turning our ‘normal’ view of things upside-down,” says Ralph Rugoff, director of the Hayward Gallery. Decision, he continued, “will ask visitors to make choices, but also, more importantly, to embrace a kind of double vision that takes in competing points of view, and embodies what Holler calls a state of ‘active uncertainty’ – a frame of mind conducive to entertaining new possibilities.”

New Readings Of Space: Placing Pools Of Oil Inside A Baroque Abbey Church

© We Find Wildness

This sculptural installation, created by Swiss artist Romain Crelier, was exhibited at Bellelay Abbey in 2013. Although the structure dates back to the 12th century, the current Abbey Church of the Assumption was built by Franz Beer in a Vorarlberg Baroque style and completed in 1714.

Almost three hundred years later Crelier’s piece, entitled La Mise en Abîme (which roughly translates to, ’to have put into an abyss’), placed two shallow pools of used engine oil to act as reflective mirrors. These ‘puddles’ “allow the viewers to interact with the architecture of the church by being pulled into the reflection so that they, in turn, become part of the themselves.” According to We Find Wildness‘ interpretation, “the installation not only dispenses multiple visual thrills and mysteries but also offers a moment where sculpture creates another reading of space.”

MoMA PS1 YAP 2015 Runner-up: Roof Deck / Erin Besler

Courtyard during warm-up. Image Courtesy of

Despite Andrés Jaque of Office of Political Innovation emerging as the winner of the 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), his competitors put up quite a fight. One of this year’s five shortlisted proposals, Erin Besler’s Roof Deck breathes life into arguably the most overlooked aspect of architecture – the roof – by injecting it with an active public program and making it a vessel for summer celebration. 

Read on after the break for more on Besler’s proposal.

Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Installations Transform INRIA

© – Sous Tension

Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY has realized two permanent installations – “Under Stress” and “Sous Tension” – in the public areas of the Department of Computer Science at the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA). Both structures “utilize programming techniques inherent in computer science to optimize the form and creating a pattern on the surface.”

“The structures engage the spaces with their intricate and gestural movements that effortlessly travel over the areas,” says the practice. “They provide visitors with iconic hubs for informal and spontaneous social gatherings while expressing the tension between the dynamic interactions from the multi-directional and converging paths within the public spaces. More than a signal for the school, they become elements of enhancement for the school’s identity.”

Stereotank’s HeartBeat Transformed into Times Square HeartSeat

©

Stereotank’s HeartBeat filled the air in Times Square this past Valentine’s Day. Now that the love season is over, the Brooklyn-based practice has turned their clever into a welcoming “HeartSeat” by simply opening up their heart-shaped sculpture to the public and transforming it into a bench. The will remain on view through Sunday, March 8th. See a video of HeartSeat, after the break.

Warming Huts Bring Life and Shelter to Winnipeg’s Frozen Rivertrail

By Invitation: The Hybrid Hut / Rojkind Arquitectos (México D.F.). Image Courtesy of

Each year Winnipeg’s Red River Mutual Rivertrail is transformed by a series of site specific “Warming Huts” that bring life and refuge to what is the world’s longest naturally frozen skating trail. The annual tradition’s popularity has grown exponentially, attracting participation from firm’s worldwide. This edition is offering visitors a highly acclaimed pop-up restaurant, a ski-through museum, and an eclectic collection of warm shelters, including a “hybrid” wood hut designed by Mexico’s Rojkind Arquitectos. You can see all eight completed installations, after the break.

Stereotank’s HeartBeat Fills the Air in Times Square

© Clint Spaulding for @TSqArts

New York City is celebrating the opening of its seventh annual Valentine’s Day  in Times Square. As part of Times Square Alliance’s heart design competition, Brooklyn-based, Venezuelan-born firm Stereotank has constructed their heart-beating urban drum in hopes to bring New Yorkers together through music.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Unveils Janet Echelman’s Latest Work: “Impatient Optimist” in Seattle

/ Impatient Optimist. Image © Ema Peter

A new aerial  by renowned artist Janet Echelman has been installed at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation campus in Seattle. Entitled “Impatient Optimist,” the sculpture consists of a custom net structure suspended above the courtyard, resulting in an ethereal floating surface which seems to defy gravity. The award-winning artist’s piece hovers above the city as a symbol of connectivity and stands as a testament to the impact an individual can have on a broader scale.

SO-IL’s Vision for a Shrink-Wrapped Manhattan

Courtesy of

Steven Holl and Vito Acconci’s Storefront for Art and Architecture has hosted its share of installations, but its newest intervention envisioned by SO-IL as part of the Blueprint exhibition is a whole new concept: covering the entire facade with shrink-wrap. The seamless outcome is deceptively simple, however, as the installation involved some careful calculations, a massive frame, and a dedicated team with an acute attention to detail. Read more about the project, see the finished product, and watch the process, here.

On View: Inside Outside’s “Museological Reconstruction” of Rotterdam’s Iconic Sonneveld House

© Johannes Schwartz

Inside Rotterdam’s Sonneveld House everything is in order: books arranged nearly on shelves, chairs tucked under tables, rugs set square on the bedroom floor. The house is a pristine tableau depicting what the interior would have looked like whilst inhabited by the eponymous Albertus Sonneveld and his family.

Yet something interesting lies underfoot, thanks to an intervention by Inside Outside that sees the entire floor of the home covered with a single, continuous mirror. Read more about the  and view selected images after the break.

Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Constructs Self-Supported “Vaulted Willow” with Ultra-Thin Aluminum Shells

© &

The Edmonton Arts Council has commissioned Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY to construct an “architectural folly” in the Canadian city’s Borden Park. The project, known as “Vaulted Willow,” aims to “resolve and delineate structure, skin and ornamentation into a single unified system” by “exploring lightweight, ultra-thin, self-supported shells through the development of custom computational protocols of structural form-finding and descriptive geometry.”

BAG Transforms Wooden Pallets into Temporary Space Observatory

© Anita Baldassari

Rome-based firm Beyond Architecture Group (BAG) has designed “experimental furniture” – dubbed Looking (C)up – for the Frammenti Music Festival at the Archaeological Park in Tusculum, . The firm, known for building houses with bales of straw, chose to craft an astronomical observatory with wooden pallets.

UNSTABLE’s AMAZE Installation Takes Visitors on a Vivid Multisensory Journey

Courtesy of

Colorful lights dance across translucent panels, illuminating the backdrop of Toronto’s glowing downtown high-rises. In their three-dimensional interactive entitled AMAZE, design and research laboratory UNSTABLE has created a multisensory experience like no other. Complex branching passageways challenge visitors to find their own path through the ever-changing structure, as if wandering through a vivid psychedelic dream. Becoming an integral part of the installation, visitors are met with dynamic shadows of the crowd and the urban landscape beyond before finding their way out of the maze.

Photography Panels Become “Pop-Up Habitats” in this Exhibition by People’s Architecture Office

Pop-Up Gallery.Times Museum, Guangzhou. Image Courtesy of People’s Architecture Office (PAO)

Inspired by the recent popularity of amateur photography in , People’s Architecture Office (PAO) + People’s Industrial Design Office (PIDO) repurposed reflective photography panels to create multipurpose Pop-Up Habitats. Incredibly lightweight and comprised of only flexible steel rings and a soft fabric, the Pop-Up Habitats can fold quickly and form self-supporting structures when expanded.

The Pop-Up Habitat has been exhibited in numerous architecture and design festivals around the world — including Beijing Design Week and the Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/Architecture in Shenzhen – and in numerous forms. The Pop-Up Habitats have been turned into an auditorium, a gallery and a canopy, in addition to “an unintended but apt backdrop for selfies” at one exhibition. A consumer version has also been developed as a “weatherproof modular tent.”

Check out some of the exhibitions the Pop-Up Habitats have been featured in after the break.

Studio Nomad Creates Mirrored Pavilion for Hungary’s Sziget Music Festival

© Balázs Danyi

With their winning competition entry for Hungary‘s Sziget festival, one of Europe’s leading music festivals, Studio Nomad created an to draw visitors back to nature. Their mirrored pavilion is a simple approach that creates a powerful experience for visitors, as more than 1200 reflective plastic sheets create shards of reflections which appear to fragment the surrounding forest.

KILO Pitches Woven Tent Outside of Jean Novel’s Arab World Institute

© IMA

In conjunction with the Contemporary Morocco exhibit (Le Maroc Contemporain) at the Jean Nouvel-designed Institut du Monde Arabe in , a giant tent has been constructed on the plaza in front of the building. Designed by and Linna Choi of KILO, the tent harmonizes contemporary design and technical innovation with traditional fabrication methods. Constructed from more than 650-square-meters of camel and goat wool woven by female cooperatives in the Saharan desert, the tent serves as an urban landmark and a symbol for the Contemporary Morocco exhibit. The rhythm and scale of the tent’s silhouette renders a topographic dimension to the structure which pays homage to the nomadic traditions of southern Morocco.

TCA Think Tank Creates “Parasite Pavilion” With Five-Day Workshop in Venice

© Marco Cappelletti

Casting complex shadows and engulfing visitors in a series of maze-like spaces, the Parasite Pavilion was constructed as part of the Synergy & Symbiosis event at the 2014 Venice Biennale, which showcased the best of the UABB Shenzhen and Hong Kong Biennale from 2005 to 2014. Based on the Bug Dome pavilion, a similar experiment from Hong Kong 2009, constructed by Weak! Architects as an icon of “illegal architecture,” this new pavilion is the product of an intensive five day workshop, with the cooperation of architects and students from Europe, Australia, and China. Read on after the break to learn more about the Pavilion and Workshop.