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Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

10:30 - 28 June, 2016
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. With this year’s edition featuring not just one pavilion but four additional “summer houses,” the program shows no sign of slowing down. Each of the previous sixteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 16th Pavilion this month, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Hélène Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © © Iwan Baan +34

Spotlight: Daniel Libeskind

12:00 - 12 May, 2016
Spotlight: Daniel Libeskind, Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht
Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht

In the architecture world, few designers can claim to have a more clearly-defined style than Daniel Libeskind (born May 12, 1946). Much of Libeskind's work is instantly recognizable for its angular forms, intersecting planes, and frequent use of diagonally-sliced windows, a style that he has used to great effect in museums and memorials - but which seems equally adaptable to conference centers, skyscrapers and shopping malls.

Daniel Libeskind Unveils Design for The Kurdistan Museum in Erbil, Iraq

12:00 - 12 April, 2016
Daniel Libeskind Unveils Design for The Kurdistan Museum in Erbil, Iraq, Courtesy of Hayes Davidson
Courtesy of Hayes Davidson

Daniel Libeskind has unveiled plans for The Kurdistan Museum in Erbil, Iraq. With the building, Studio Libeskind seeks to create “the first major center in the Kurdistan Region for the history and culture of the Kurdish people.” The project was developed as a collaboration between the Kurdistan Regional Government (the KRG) and client representative RWF World. The 150,000 square-foot museum will feature exhibition spaces for both permanent and temporary exhibitions, a lecture theatre, state-of-the-art multimedia educational resources, an extensive digital archive of Kurdish historical assets, as well as community center and landscaped outdoor spaces for public use.

Courtesy of Hayes Davidson Courtesy of Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Crystal +11

6 Architects Share What It’s Like to Build in New York

12:00 - 18 February, 2016

In the latest video from the Louisiana Channel, six architects – Bjarke Ingels, Liz Diller, Daniel Libeskind, Robert A.M. Stern, Thom Mayne, and Craig Dykers – share what it’s like to build in New York. From the High Line to the 9/11 Memorial Museum Pavilion at Ground Zero, the architects each describe their approach to designing in the iconic city.

Zaha Hadid and Sou Fujimoto Among 30 to Design Pre-Fab Pavilions for Revolution Pre-Crafted

13:00 - 25 January, 2016
Zaha Hadid and Sou Fujimoto Among 30 to Design Pre-Fab Pavilions for Revolution Pre-Crafted, VOLU Dining Pavilion at Design Miami. Image Courtesy of Revolution PreCraft
VOLU Dining Pavilion at Design Miami. Image Courtesy of Revolution PreCraft

Following the recent trend of luxury pre-fabricated structures like Muji’s recent three huts, Robbie Antonio’s “Revolution Pre-Crafted” is a collection of pre-fabricated pavilions by 30 top designers and architects, including Zaha Hadid, Sou Fujimoto, Daniel Libeskind and Gluckman Tang. Some have already been built, being exhibited at Design Miami, while others are planned for the future.

With recent advancements in building technology, Revolution Pre-Crafted hopes to democratize the design of pre-fab structures, offering a line of products that incorporate the distinct spatial and social brands of the designers. See a selection of the Revolution Precraft line after the break.

Daniel Libeskind on Immigration, New York City, and 'the State of the World'

04:00 - 30 November, 2015
Daniel Libeskind on Immigration, New York City, and 'the State of the World', © Stefan Ruiz
© Stefan Ruiz

In an exclusive interview with Daniel Libeskind, who is based in New York City ("a microcosm of the world") and describes himself as having been "an immigrant several times," discusses his origins, his family, his early influences and the 'state of the world', touching upon a great theme in his built works: that of memorialising and remembrance in the built environment. Having grown up under "terrible oppression" in post-war Poland and moved between countries eighteen times, he describes himself as a citizen of the world with a great deal of retrospective advice for prospective architects.

Daniel Libeskind Discusses "Building Memory"

03:58 - 20 October, 2015
Daniel Libeskind Discusses "Building Memory", Daniel Libeskind (2015). Image © Stefan Ruiz
Daniel Libeskind (2015). Image © Stefan Ruiz

In this edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, David Plaisant speaks to Daniel Libeskind about the art and architecture of memory, with particular focus on his designs for his Ground Zero Masterplan and memorial in New York City. The show also discusses plans to transform John F. Kennedy airport's iconic TWA Terminal, and head to Singapore to meet the team at Ministry of Design.

Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum Berlin Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

16:00 - 9 September, 2015
Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum Berlin Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, Jewish Museum Berlin / Daniel Libeskind. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Jewish Museum Berlin / Daniel Libeskind. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Jewish Museum in Berlin opened its doors 14 years ago today. Inspired by a lecture given by Daniel Libeskind, Berlin-based photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu captured the building and its dramatic plays of light and texture in a series of 20 photographs. 

Exhibition: Childhood ReCollections

07:00 - 25 August, 2015
Exhibition: Childhood ReCollections, Daniel Libeskind with accordion in Lodz, Poland, 1955
Daniel Libeskind with accordion in Lodz, Poland, 1955

Zaha Hadid, Kengo Kuma, Daniel Libeskind, Nieto Sobejano, Denise Scott Brown and Philip Treacy reveal the childhood recollections that have shaped their outstanding visions and work.

Architects and designers are often asked whose work inspired them as students and influenced their thinking, but Roca London Gallery’s autumn show suggests that design inspiration actually goes back much further than this, into early childhood, and can take some unexpected forms. 

25 Architects You Should Know

16:00 - 18 July, 2015
25 Architects You Should Know, © Flickr CC user victortsu
© Flickr CC user victortsu

As an unavoidable art form, “architecture is one of humanity’s most visible and long-lasting forms of expression,” writes Complex Media. Within the past 150 years—the period of modern architecture—a distinct form of artistry has developed, significantly changing the way we look at the urban environments around us. To highlight some of the key figures in architecture over the past 150 years, Complex Media has created a list of “25 Architects You Should Know,” covering a range of icons including Zaha HadidIeoh Ming PeiPhilip JohnsonOscar NeimeyerSOMDaniel Libeskind, and more. Read the full list to learn more about each iconic architect, here.

Daniel Libeskind to be CNN Style's First Guest Editor

12:49 - 1 July, 2015
Daniel Libeskind to be CNN Style's First Guest Editor, AD Classics: Jewish Museum, Berlin / Daniel Libeskind. Image © Mal Booth
AD Classics: Jewish Museum, Berlin / Daniel Libeskind. Image © Mal Booth

Daniel Libeskind will be joining CNN for a month-long editorship that will explore the "interplay between architecture and emotion." As CNN reports, CNN Style is a "new international destination for cosmopolitan, global audiences" that will kickstart with Libeskind's architecture series this July.

AD Classics: V&A Spiral / Daniel Libeskind + Cecil Balmond

06:00 - 29 June, 2015
AD Classics: V&A Spiral / Daniel Libeskind + Cecil Balmond, Courtesy of Balmond Studio & Studio Libeskind
Courtesy of Balmond Studio & Studio Libeskind

The violent insertion of Daniel Libeskind’s Spiral into the Victorian neighborhood of South Kensington renders a cataclysmic disruption into a landscape of order and propriety. It envisions a rupture in the fabric of space and time, aggressively anachronistic from the building it adjoins, unapologetically appealing not to cultured humanism but to the mathematical logic of complexity and chaos. What is now textbook "Libeskind" was in 1996 a shocking non-starter for the London establishment, an unacceptable risk for a city perpetually torn between its agitated cosmopolitan energies and its quintessential impulse toward nostalgia and restraint. Nearly twenty years after the Spiral was selected as the winner of a distinguished international competition, this controversial extension proposal for the Victoria and Albert Museum remains unbuilt.

Courtesy of Balmond Studio & Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Balmond Studio & Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Balmond Studio & Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Balmond Studio & Studio Libeskind +18

7 Leading Architects Defend the World's Most Hated Buildings

12:38 - 5 June, 2015
7 Leading Architects Defend the World's Most Hated Buildings, Vele di Scampia. Image © Nick Hannes/Hollandse Hoogte/Redux
Vele di Scampia. Image © Nick Hannes/Hollandse Hoogte/Redux

From Paris' most abhorred tower to New York's controversial government center, seven renowned architects have stepped up in defense of the world's most hated buildings in a newly published article on T Magazine. As told to Alexandra Lange, the article presents direct quotes from Zaha Hadid, Daniel Libeskind, Norman Foster and four others regarding controversial architecture whose importance goes beyond aesthetics.

See what hated building Norman Foster believes to be a "heroic" structure, after the break. 

A Guided Tour Of The 2015 Milan Expo

10:30 - 8 May, 2015
© Hufton+Crow
© Hufton+Crow

With 145 countries participating in the 2015 Expo, alongside input from international organizations, corporate partners and an extensive program organized by the Expo itself, there's a lot going on in Milan right now. So much so, in fact, that it can be a little overwhelming to get a handle on all the sights that are worth your attention.

To help you out, we've put together a guided tour of the key pavilions that are turning heads, including the defining vistas of the expo grounds, the displays that are worth your time and the oddities that might entertain. From the Expo's defining icon, the 30-meter-tall Tree of Life, to the exhibition on architecture's favorite consumable (that's coffee), and all the national pavilions in between, the things you need to see are here. Whether you're planning to visit the Expo and want a quick and dirty way to ensure you've covered the highlights, or whether you're simply hoping to live vicariously through the internet, this tour is for you.

© Evan Rawn © Evan Rawn © Min Keun Park © Hufton+Crow +38

Daniel Libeskind's "Future Flowers" Represent Oikos at Milan Design Week

15:00 - 26 April, 2015
Daniel Libeskind's "Future Flowers" Represent Oikos at Milan Design Week, Courtesy of Oikos
Courtesy of Oikos

Daniel Libeskind, together with Italian paint company Oikos, has transformed the Università Statale’s Pharmacy Courtyard into a garden of "Future Flowers" as part of the 2015 Milan Design Week. On view through May 24, the installation was inspired by one of Libeskind’s "Chamberwork" drawings. It features a series of intersecting red metal "blades" that represent a collection of Oikos paints developed by Libeskind. 

The Life Of Dalibor Vesely: Teacher, Philosopher, Acclaimed Academic

04:00 - 3 April, 2015
The Life Of Dalibor Vesely: Teacher, Philosopher, Acclaimed Academic, Dalibor Vesely (1934-2015) at the AA, London, in 2013. Image © Valerie Bennett
Dalibor Vesely (1934-2015) at the AA, London, in 2013. Image © Valerie Bennett

Dalibor Vesely, a celebrated architectural historian, philosopher and teacher, died this week in London aged 79. Over the course of his teaching career, which spanned five decades, he tutored a number of the world’s leading architects and thinkers from Daniel Libeskind, Alberto Pérez-Gómez and Robin Evans, to Mohsen Mostafavi and David Leatherbarrow.

Vesely was born in Prague in 1934, five years before the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia. Following World War II, he studied engineering, architecture, art history and philosophy in Prague, Munich, Paris and Heidelberg. He was awarded his doctorate from Charles University (Prague) having been taught and supervised by Josef Havlicek, Karel Honzik, and Jaroslav Fragner. Although later he would be tutored by James Stirling, it was the philosopher of phenomenology Jan Patočka who, in his own words, “contributed more than anyone else to [his] overall intellectual orientation and to the articulation of some of the critical topics” explored in his seminal book, Architecture in the Age of Divided Representation, published in 2004.

LOBBY #2: Projecting Forward, Looking Back

09:30 - 27 March, 2015
LOBBY #2: Projecting Forward, Looking Back, © Cameron Clarke
© Cameron Clarke

From Vitruvius to Le Corbusier, words and writing have always played an essential role in architectural discourse. One could argue that crafting words is akin to orchestrating space: indeed, history’s most notable architects and designers are often remembered for their written philosophies as much as they are for their built works.

With the exception of a few of architecture’s biggest names, the majority of practicing architects no longer exploit the inherent value writing offers as a means for spatial and theoretical communication. This trend is exacerbated by the fact that many architectural schools place little emphasis on the once-primary subjects of history and literature, resulting in a generation of architects who struggle to articulate their ideas in words, resulting in an ever-growing proliferation of ill-defined “archispeak.”

LOBBY is an attempt from students of London’s Bartlett School of Architecture to reclaim the potency of the written word, presenting in their second issue an ambitious array of in-house research and external contributions. The theme is Clairvoyance, and the journal seeks to investigate the ways in which architects are forced to constantly grapple with the possibilities and uncertainties of designing spaces that exist in the intangible realm of the world-to-be.

© Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke © Cameron Clarke +11

In Residence: Daniel Libeskind

14:10 - 25 February, 2015

The latest installation of the In Residence series, Polish-born architect Daniel Libeskind welcomes NOWNESS into his Manhattan apartment, just five blocks north of Ground Zero.