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Spotlight: Daniel Libeskind

04:00 - 12 May, 2017
Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht
Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht

In the architecture world, few designers can claim to have a more clearly-defined style than Daniel Libeskind (born May 12, 1946). Much of Libeskind's work is instantly recognizable for its angular forms, intersecting planes, and frequent use of diagonally-sliced windows, a style that he has used to great effect in museums and memorials—but which he has equally adapted to conference centers, skyscrapers, and shopping malls.

Denver Art Museum. Image © Bitter Brecht Jewish Museum, Berlin. Image © Mal Booth Dresden’s Military History Museum. Image © Bitter Bredt, Courtesy of Studio Daniel LIbeskind Vanke Pavilion – Milan Expo 2015. Image © Hufton+Crow +17

This Photoseries Captures the State of China’s Renowned Architectural Icons

06:00 - 20 April, 2017
This Photoseries Captures the State of China’s Renowned Architectural Icons, © Kris Provoost
© Kris Provoost

A simultaneous celebration of their cultural iconicity and distillation from their various contexts, Beautified China is a photographic essay by Kris Provoost (one-half of the vlogging duo behind #donotsettle) that tracks the evolution of Chinese architectural landmarks over the course of the past 7 years. Beginning his investigation with the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai, Provoost considers a decade of architecture proposed for China by the profession’s biggest names, many of which have been built now with monumental reputations in rising cities. 

“Most ‘starchitects’ had their chance to build, or to fulfill their wildest dreams,” explains Provoost. “Some of them became landmarks: CCTV headquarters by Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren or the Bird’s Nest/National Stadium by Herzog and de Meuron for example. Others have turned a suburb into a new center, or have established a new city on its own.”

International Youth Centre / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Kris Provoost China Pavilion / JingTang. Image © Kris Provoost British Pavilion / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Kris Provoost Galaxy SOHO / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Kris Provoost +22

AD Classics: 1988 Deconstructivist Exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

07:00 - 29 March, 2017
AD Classics: 1988 Deconstructivist Exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), View into the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA
View into the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA

When Philip Johnson curated the Museum of Modern Arts’ (MoMA) 1932 “International Exhibition of Modern Architecture,” he did so with the explicit intention of defining the International Style. As a guest curator at the same institution in 1988 alongside Mark Wigley (now Dean Emeritus of the Columbia GSAPP), Johnson took the opposite approach: rather than present architecture derived from a rigidly uniform set of design principles, he gathered a collection of work by architects whose similar (but not identical) approaches had yielded similar results. The designers he selected—Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, and the firm Coop Himmelblau (led by Wolf Prix)—would prove to be some of the most influential architects of the late 20th Century to the present day.[1,2]

Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA 1988 Catalogue Cover. Image via MoMA +6

Video: Daniel Libeskind on the "Jungle" of New York City

16:00 - 21 December, 2016

“If you took the whole world and collapsed it into one little ball, you’d find it here, in this city.”

In this video from the Louisiana Channel, Daniel Libeskind talks about the chaotic beauty of and his love for New York City. Born in Poland, at the age of 13 Libeskind immigrated to New York, where he witnessed both the building and the collapse of the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers. Intimate with the site, Libeskind was later tasked with designing the masterplan for the World Trade Center's reconstruction.

Check out the video to hear the architect discuss the tolerance, complexities and fascination of his adopted home.

Studio Libeskind Reveals Plans for Holocaust Monument of Names in Amsterdam

12:00 - 21 December, 2016
Studio Libeskind Reveals Plans for Holocaust Monument of Names in Amsterdam, Courtesy of Studio Libeskind
Courtesy of Studio Libeskind

Studio Libeskind and the Dutch Auschwitz Committee have revealed plans for the Holocaust Monument of Names, to be located in the heart of Amsterdam’s Jewish Cultural District. Incorporating the letters of the Hebrew word לזכר (meaning “In Memory of”), the memorial will be the first to memorialize the names of all 102,000 Dutch victims of the Holocaust.

Courtesy of Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Studio Libeskind +7

Proposed Station Extension Promotes Urbanism and Social Interaction in Nice

12:00 - 13 November, 2016

Clément Blanchet Architecture has released its bid for the international Nice Station Extension competition, which also received entries from Marc Mimram, Jean Duthilleul, and winner Daniel Libeskind. The proposal integrates buildings in the city center of Nice—which is surrounded by railways, a ring road, and the city—including a new mixed-use public complex, retail and office spaces, and a boutique hotel.  

© Clément Blanchet Architecture © Clément Blanchet Architecture © Clément Blanchet Architecture © Clément Blanchet Architecture +11

Mapped Movies: The Architecture and Settings Behind Film's Greatest Moments

09:30 - 21 October, 2016
Mapped Movies: The Architecture and Settings Behind Film's Greatest Moments, © Unsplash user Noom Peerapong. Licensed under CC0.
© Unsplash user Noom Peerapong. Licensed under CC0.

Stories have a way of clinging to places, charging buildings and spaces with an effect only perceptible to those who know what they once staged. Film is the most visual storytelling medium, and their environments often play memorable and vital roles in creating the movie's character and identity. The popularity of film tourism is testament to this phenomena. While the bulk of film tourism stems from blockbuster movies and their exposure and celebrity, the blog Filmap takes a more humble approach in highlighting the stories of everyday places.

For the past three years, the blog has laboriously tracked the locations of hundreds of movie scenes using Google Streetview, pairing stripped-back street views right next to their cinematographic counterparts. The resulting contrast elevates the everyday while also grounding fiction to our very streets, a reminder of the built environment’s role as a vessel of imagination.

A selection of Filmap’s posts are shared below – how many movies can you recognize from their real-life settings alone?

Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics: Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century

02:30 - 20 October, 2016
Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics: Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics brings together a series of thirteen interview-articles by Graham Cairns in collaboration with some of the most prominent polemic thinkers and critical practitioners from the fields of architecture and the social sciences, including Noam Chomsky, Peggy Deamer, Robert A.M. Stern, Daniel Libeskind and Kenneth Frampton.

Santiago Calatrava's Oculus Opens to the Sky in Remembrance of 9/11

16:00 - 12 September, 2016

On the 15th anniversary of 9/11 yesterday, the skylights at Santiago Calatrava’s Oculus at the World Trade Center opened for the first time, allowing light to fill the massive space as a memorial to the attacks on the twin towers. Following the masterplan laid out by Daniel Libeskind, Calatrava’s design used the angle of light as a guiding principle for orienting the transportation hub – so that at precisely 10:28 am each September 11th (the time of the collapse of the North Tower), a beam of light would pass through the opening in the roof and project all the way down the center of the Oculus floor.

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

10:30 - 28 June, 2016
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. With this year’s edition featuring not just one pavilion but four additional “summer houses,” the program shows no sign of slowing down. Each of the previous sixteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 16th Pavilion this month, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Hélène Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © © Iwan Baan +34

Daniel Libeskind Unveils Design for The Kurdistan Museum in Erbil, Iraq

12:00 - 12 April, 2016
Daniel Libeskind Unveils Design for The Kurdistan Museum in Erbil, Iraq, Courtesy of Hayes Davidson
Courtesy of Hayes Davidson

Daniel Libeskind has unveiled plans for The Kurdistan Museum in Erbil, Iraq. With the building, Studio Libeskind seeks to create “the first major center in the Kurdistan Region for the history and culture of the Kurdish people.” The project was developed as a collaboration between the Kurdistan Regional Government (the KRG) and client representative RWF World. The 150,000 square-foot museum will feature exhibition spaces for both permanent and temporary exhibitions, a lecture theatre, state-of-the-art multimedia educational resources, an extensive digital archive of Kurdish historical assets, as well as community center and landscaped outdoor spaces for public use.

Courtesy of Hayes Davidson Courtesy of Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Studio Libeskind Courtesy of Crystal +11

6 Architects Share What It’s Like to Build in New York

12:00 - 18 February, 2016

In the latest video from the Louisiana Channel, six architects – Bjarke Ingels, Liz Diller, Daniel Libeskind, Robert A.M. Stern, Thom Mayne, and Craig Dykers – share what it’s like to build in New York. From the High Line to the 9/11 Memorial Museum Pavilion at Ground Zero, the architects each describe their approach to designing in the iconic city.

Zaha Hadid and Sou Fujimoto Among 30 to Design Pre-Fab Pavilions for Revolution Pre-Crafted

13:00 - 25 January, 2016
Zaha Hadid and Sou Fujimoto Among 30 to Design Pre-Fab Pavilions for Revolution Pre-Crafted, VOLU Dining Pavilion at Design Miami. Image Courtesy of Revolution PreCraft
VOLU Dining Pavilion at Design Miami. Image Courtesy of Revolution PreCraft

Following the recent trend of luxury pre-fabricated structures like Muji’s recent three huts, Robbie Antonio’s “Revolution Pre-Crafted” is a collection of pre-fabricated pavilions by 30 top designers and architects, including Zaha Hadid, Sou Fujimoto, Daniel Libeskind and Gluckman Tang. Some have already been built, being exhibited at Design Miami, while others are planned for the future.

With recent advancements in building technology, Revolution Pre-Crafted hopes to democratize the design of pre-fab structures, offering a line of products that incorporate the distinct spatial and social brands of the designers. See a selection of the Revolution Precraft line after the break.

Daniel Libeskind on Immigration, New York City, and 'the State of the World'

04:00 - 30 November, 2015
Daniel Libeskind on Immigration, New York City, and 'the State of the World', © Stefan Ruiz
© Stefan Ruiz

In an exclusive interview with Daniel Libeskind, who is based in New York City ("a microcosm of the world") and describes himself as having been "an immigrant several times," discusses his origins, his family, his early influences and the 'state of the world', touching upon a great theme in his built works: that of memorialising and remembrance in the built environment. Having grown up under "terrible oppression" in post-war Poland and moved between countries eighteen times, he describes himself as a citizen of the world with a great deal of retrospective advice for prospective architects.

Daniel Libeskind Discusses "Building Memory"

03:58 - 20 October, 2015
Daniel Libeskind Discusses "Building Memory", Daniel Libeskind (2015). Image © Stefan Ruiz
Daniel Libeskind (2015). Image © Stefan Ruiz

In this edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, David Plaisant speaks to Daniel Libeskind about the art and architecture of memory, with particular focus on his designs for his Ground Zero Masterplan and memorial in New York City. The show also discusses plans to transform John F. Kennedy airport's iconic TWA Terminal, and head to Singapore to meet the team at Ministry of Design.

Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum Berlin Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

16:00 - 9 September, 2015
Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum Berlin Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, Jewish Museum Berlin / Daniel Libeskind. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Jewish Museum Berlin / Daniel Libeskind. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Jewish Museum in Berlin opened its doors 14 years ago today. Inspired by a lecture given by Daniel Libeskind, Berlin-based photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu captured the building and its dramatic plays of light and texture in a series of 20 photographs. 

Exhibition: Childhood ReCollections

07:00 - 25 August, 2015
Exhibition: Childhood ReCollections, Daniel Libeskind with accordion in Lodz, Poland, 1955
Daniel Libeskind with accordion in Lodz, Poland, 1955

Zaha Hadid, Kengo Kuma, Daniel Libeskind, Nieto Sobejano, Denise Scott Brown and Philip Treacy reveal the childhood recollections that have shaped their outstanding visions and work.

Architects and designers are often asked whose work inspired them as students and influenced their thinking, but Roca London Gallery’s autumn show suggests that design inspiration actually goes back much further than this, into early childhood, and can take some unexpected forms. 

25 Architects You Should Know

16:00 - 18 July, 2015
25 Architects You Should Know, © Flickr CC user victortsu
© Flickr CC user victortsu

As an unavoidable art form, “architecture is one of humanity’s most visible and long-lasting forms of expression,” writes Complex Media. Within the past 150 years—the period of modern architecture—a distinct form of artistry has developed, significantly changing the way we look at the urban environments around us. To highlight some of the key figures in architecture over the past 150 years, Complex Media has created a list of “25 Architects You Should Know,” covering a range of icons including Zaha HadidIeoh Ming PeiPhilip JohnsonOscar NeimeyerSOMDaniel Libeskind, and more. Read the full list to learn more about each iconic architect, here.