Event: “House Housing: An Untimely History of Architecture and Real Estate”

House Housing is the first public presentation of a multi-year research project conducted by the Temple Hoyne for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University. Situated in the Casa Muraro in Venice and staged as an open house, the exhibition responds unsolicited to the proposal by Rem Koolhaas, curator of the 14th International Architecture Exhibition, that architecture focus on its “fundamentals.”

According to the organisers, “House Housing replies by considering architecture’s economic fundamentals, which locate housing at the center of the current economic regime, with the as an influential node in a transnational network. In architecture, economic fundamentals are built from the ground up. The laws of real estate—relating to the acquisition of land, the financing of construction, the cost of building maintenance and services, profit from rent or resale, the value of equity, or the price of credit—inexorably shape any building component (like a window) and any building type (like a house).”

“They are visible even in the residential work of such singular figures as Frank Lloyd Wright, not least because the Greek oikos, or household, forms the root of the word “economy” itself. But look closely and you will see that what seems fundamental, basic, or natural is, like any other law, a historical artifact permanently under construction and subject to change. House Housing narrates nineteen brief episodes from across the last one hundred years in a mixture of domestic media.”

Find out more about the event here.

Plumber: Is This Not A Pipe? – Launch of Volume 37

Launch of Volume #37: “Is this not a pipe?”.

With the participation of Benedict Clouette (C-Lab), Jeffrey Inaba (C-Lab), Bjarke Ingels (BIG), Mahadev Raman (ARUP), Hilary Sample (MOS).

“Pipes are the physical remainder of life in buildings.” With contributions by Juan Herreros, Neil Denari, Andrés Jaque, Matthias Schuler, and many others, Volume 37: Is This Not A Pipe poses the age-old question: Tube or not Tube?

The issue will be available for purchase at the discounted rate of $10.

We cannot beat Banham, but we can update you on what happened since 1972, when Rayner Banham published his seminal The Architecture of the Well Tempered EnvironmentC-Lab did extensive new research on the relation between installations, buildings and architecture…

“Architecture relies on machines. They make the structures of our cities liveable.”

Life in buildings is supported by pipes. Ducts, conduits, water mains, and cables support biological and social life in spaces that are today held together by air-conditioning, electricity, and telecommunications as much as by form and materials. But while pipes and the machines they connect are part of buildings, they are often left out of architecture.

It’s fascinating to see how architects dealt with pipes in history and what challenges they face today. How did Mies van der Rohe solve this issue, what was Norman Foster’s approach and what does someone like Bjarke Ingels have to say on this? They’ve come up with all sort of strategies, from deceitfully transparent buildings seemingly without any mechanical installation, to faux ‘oil refineries’ showcasing the machinery that makes the mechanism tick. The latest strategy is trying to do away with installations altogether and make the building itself perform without mechanical support: smart ‘downgrading’.

This issue of Volume presents C-lab’s research – which will also be a part of next year’s Biennale in Rem Koolhaas’ Fundamentals show – and includes contributions by , Kiel Moe, David Gissen, An Te Lui, Phil Bernstein, Filip Tejchman, John Hejduk and James Stamp. Also interviews with Matthias Schuler, Neil Denari, Christian Kerez, Bjarke Ingels, Tom Wiscombe, Andrès Jaque, MOS, Juan Herreros, Philippe Rahm, Mahadev Raman, Florian Idenburg and Lothar Schwedt.

Volume #37: Is This Not a Pipe?
160 pages
Binding: Soft-cover
ISBN 978 90 77966 372
Price: € 19.50
Release: November 2013
Editor-in-chief: Arjen Oosterman
Contributing editors: Ole Bouman, Rem Koolhaas, Mark Wigley
This issue’s editor: Jeffrey Inaba
Design: Irma Boom and Sonja Haller
Publisher: Stichting Archis

Are Ivy League Schools Really Offering the Best Architectural Education?

Harvard University’s Gund Hall. Image Courtesy of Harvard University

In Design Intelligence‘s annual rankings of US Architecture Schools, released earlier this month, there is certainly a lot to talk about. Of course, plenty will be said about what is shown immediately by the statistics, and rightly so – but just as interesting is what is revealed between the lines of this report, about the schools themselves and the culture they exist within. By taking the opinions of professional architects, teachers and students, the Design Intelligence report exposes a complex network which, when examined closely enough, reveals what some might see as a worrying trend within architectural education.

From STEM To STEAM: The Value of Art

Edison High School Academic Building. Image © Paul Mullins

In a recent article for the Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce, champions the idea of transforming into STEAM (Science, Technology, ART, and Mathematics). He argues that overlapping science and art helps launch cross-disciplinary conversations and relationships, and in turn, promote experimentation; he thus suggests that educational spaces be designed to bring these fields together. Check out the article here, and more about the TED talk that inspired it, here.

Mark Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia University’s GSAPP

Mark Wigley with , during the filming of The Glass House: “Conversations in Context”. Image Courtesy of http://vimeo.com/44405886

Mark Wigley announced Monday that he will be stepping down as dean of ’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) at the end of the academic year in 2014. 

“In every context, he has represented the School and the institution in ways that make us all proud to be part of such a vibrant place,” wrote Columbia President, Lee Bollinger, “And to all of it he has brought his unique humor and made us laugh.”

A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America

Vishaan Chakrabarti. Image © Tina Gao, Columbia University GSAPP

Last monday, Columbia University’s Avery Hall was buzzing.

The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) hosted a highly attended event that welcomed respected academics and professionals from architecture and real estate to what the dean, Mark Wigley, warned might take the form a a celebrity roast. Vishaan Chakrabarti, a partner at SHoP Architects and director of the Center for Urban Real Estate at Columbia, was on deck to deliver an abridged, more “urban version” of a longer lecture on his new book, A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America. Proceeding the twenty minute lecture, an “A-list” panel of architects and historians -  that included Kenneth Frampton, Gwendolyn Wright, Bernard Tschumi, Laurie Hawkinson and Reinhold Martin – lined up to discuss Chakrabarti’s work.

AD Interviews: Saskia Sassen

Sociologist Saskia Sassen‘s researches and writes about the social, economic and political dimensions of globalization, immigration, and networked technologies in cities around the globe. Her books and writings—published in over sixteen languages—have sustained the interests of architects and planners who seek to better understand the city via the systemic conditions that find expression in the reality of urban space.

Now actively involved in teaching Columbia University, we caught up with Sassen at the Arquine Congress in Mexico City, where she shared some interesting views on the role of architects, her contemplations on the future of the city, and her thoughts on the impact of the internet on the city.

Check out a full transcript of our interview with Sassen after the break.

Video: Steven Holl on Columbia University’s Campbell Sports Center

Legendary American architect Steven Holl has collaborated again with Spirit of Space to produce two short videos on the recently completed Campbell Sports Center in . While always compelling to hear an architect discuss a project, these videos integrate the architect’s narration with different dynamic shots of the building’s detail and context, thus truly immersing the viewer in the project.

The first video (above) features Steven Holl and senior partner explaining the project’s inspiration, design concept and program; simultaneously, the filmmakers take us into the space and show how the new athletic facility is being used by the student athletes. The second, shorter, video (after the break) shows the building in the city, revealing the fascinatingly complex relationship between the passing subway cars, the field hockey players, the movement of shadows and the building itself.

See the second video, after the break…

A:LOG : A Notebook Designed Just for Architects

Courtesy of A:LOG

Three graduate architecture students at Columbia University have developed a revolutionary notebook designed specifically for architects. “A:LOG is not just a nifty architect’s notebook,” they say. “It is a thoughtful collection of design and architectural standards packaged into a minimal soft-cover notebook with beautiful dotted paper for drawing. It’s an architectural reference guide that you can bring with you on the go, in the office, or at meetings.”

Learn more about A:LOG after the break!

Assess: Who Cares for Chilean Cities?

“Assess: Chile at Columbia” is an initiative led by the Latin Lab at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation’s () of Columbia University that discusses, in several formats, the state of contemporary in the southern country by addressing the question: who cares for Chilean ?

This project aims to raise questions and skip external, often patronizing understandings of Chilean practices. To do so, “Assess: Chile at Columbia” invites Chilean scholars who— closely in touch with both national practices and international debates in the fields of architecture, public space, and urban projects—are uniquely positioned to initiate a critical conversation.

Distinguished Chilean scholars Luis Eduardo Bresciani, Romy Hecht, and Rodrigo Pérez de Arce selected three projects to represent each of the aforementioned categories in the exhibition Answers form Architecture, Public Space and Urban Projects, to be held on the 100 Level of Avery Hall. This show will inform the Conference “Who cares for Chilean cities?,” at which renowned US-based scholars Saskia Sassen, Stan Allen, and Iñaki Ábalos will assess the topics and works presented by their Chilean peers, opening up a further discussion moderated by GSAPP faculty Clara Irazábal, Galia Solomonoff, and Enrique Walker.

Event: Buell Center at Columbia University presents “Comments on Comments”

Courtesy of The Buell Center

How do we talk about architecture? ? Cities? Culture? Politics? And, equally important, how don’t we talk about them? Comments on Foreclosed, a forthcoming and online archive of public reactions to Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream, a 2012 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York that was co-curated by the Buell Center, has been produced to document just this kind of public discussion and the various platforms that shape it.

On February 18th, The Buell Center will mark the completion of the book and website, www.commentsonforeclosed.com, with a public event, “Comments on Comments”.  A performance of excerpts from the archive will open a multimedia panel discussion and Q&A.  In so doing, certain gaps in the public conversation on American housing and urbanism will be identified, and systemic deficiencies called out.

Frank Lloyd Wright Archives relocate to New York

Frank Lloyd Wright by JOHN AMARANTIDES, 1955. ”The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, , New York)”

The Museum of Modern Art, Columbia University and The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation have announced that the vast archives of American architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) have been jointly acquired by the University and the Museum and will become part of their permanent collections. The archive, which includes some 23,000 architectural drawings, 44,000 historical photographs, large-scale models, manuscripts, extensive correspondence and other documents, has remained in storage at Wright’s former headquarters – Taliesin (Spring Green, WI) and Taliesin West (Scottsdale, AZ) – since his death. Moving the archives to New York will maximize the visibility and research value of the collection for generations of scholars, students and the public.

“The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation takes seriously its responsibility to serve the public good by ensuring the best possible conservation, accessibility, and impact of one of the most important and meaningful archives in the world,” said Sean Malone, CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. “Given the individual strengths, resources and abilities of the Foundation, and Columbia, it became clear that this collaborative stewardship is far and away the best way to guarantee the deepest impact, the highest level of conservation and the best public access.”

Continue after the break for more images and an informative video. 

Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building

Exterior View South – Courtesy of CUMC

Columbia University has been at the forefront of medical education for more than two centuries, as it was the first medical school in the to award the M.D. degree in 1770. Now, the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has announced plans for a new, state-of-the-art medical and graduate education building that reflects how they believe medicine is and should be taught, learned and practiced in the 21st century.

Located on the CUMC campus in the Washington Heights community of Northern Manhattan, the 14-story facility will aim to achieve LEED Gold certification and incorporate technologically advanced classrooms, collaboration spaces, and a modern simulation center. The design is led by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in collaboration with Gensler as executive architect.

Continue after the break for more details!

We Are Here Now / Spatial Information Design Lab / Columbia University

© Spatial Information Design Lab

Addicted to checking your favorite site, like ArchDaily, for constant updates, or checking in with Facebook or Foursquare? Don’t worry – you’re not alone, and Columbia’s Spatial Information Design Lab can prove it.  In addition to sharing your whereabouts with friends, your geographic mark provides valuable insight in examining the psycho-geography and economic terrain of the city.

More about the study after the break.

‘Interpretations: Promiscuous Encounters’ Symposium

Courtesy of GSAPP

The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP) at will be holding the Interpretations: Promiscuous Encounters Syposium taking place Friday, March 23rd from 12:00pm – 8:30pm. Promiscuous Encounters, which is free and open to the public, has two main ambitions: first, to examine the fascinating blurriness and productive interplay between the critical, curatorial and conceptual capacities of architecture, including how and where they intersect and overlap and, second, to expand the definitions of what these terms mean in relation to theory and practice by reexamining the sites of criticality and their modes of operation. More information on the event after the break.

In Progress: Steven Holl Architects’ Campbell Sports Center Tops Out

©

The Campbell Sports Center at Columbia University celebrated its topping out last Wednesday. Steven Holl Architects designed the “inviting new gateway” for the Baker Athletics Complex – the primary athletics facility for the University’s outdoor sports program. With the structural frame place, the large interior space and amazing views of the city are already able to be experienced. Construction is two weeks ahead of schedule and the athletic complex is planned to open this fall. Continue reading for more images and information.

 

Steven Holl Architects’ Campbell Sports Center Breaks Ground at Columbia University

Courtesy of

Campbell Sports Center designed by Steven Holl Architects began construction over the weekend. Complimenting the existing Baker Athletics Complex, the Campbell Sports Center will create a necessary and inviting new gateway to Columbia University’s complex at its location on the corner of West 218th street and Broadway.  The five-story, 48,000 sqf facility will include an auditorium, strength training and conditioning rooms, offices for varsity sports, a hospitality suite, and student-athlete study rooms.  Led by Steven Holl and Chris McVoy, the Campbell sports Center is scheduled to open in fall 2012.

Steven Holl shared, “We are honored to collaborate with Dianne Murphy and Columbia Facilities in creating this new state of the art athletics facility. Its inviting architecture indicates the invigorating presence and future of intercollegiate athletics at Columbia University.”

GSAPP Columbia University Events

Courtesy of GSAPP

Columbia University’s School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation recently shared with us their event schedule for Fall 2011. The event series will run from September 9th to November 29th and start at 6:30pm in Wood Auditorium, Avery Hall, unless otherwise noted. The are free and open to the public. More information on the after the break.