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"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships

The world of architecture is small. So small in fact, that Rem Koolhaas has been credited with the creation of over forty practices worldwide, led by the likes of Zaha Hadid and Bjarke Ingels. Dubbed “Baby Rems” by Metropolis Magazine, this Koolhaas effect is hardly an isolated pattern, with manifestations far beyond the walls of OMA. The phenomenon has dominated the world of architecture, assisted by the prevalence and increasing necessity of internships for burgeoning architects.

In a recent article for Curbed, Patrick Sisson dug into the storied history of internships to uncover some unexpected connections between the world's most prolific architects. With the help of Sisson's list, we've compiled a record of the humble beginnings of the household names of architecture. Where did Frank Gehry get his start? Find out after the break.

Renzo Piano's pavilion at Louis Kahn's Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Robert Laprelle Jeanne Gang worked on OMA's Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Mies van der Rohe worked on Behren's AEG Turbine Factory. Image © Flickr CC user Joseph The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York by Louis Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Jack E. Boucher

Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa

Carlo Scarpa, circa 1970. Image via Selldorf Architects
Carlo Scarpa, circa 1970. Image via Selldorf Architects

One of the most enigmatic and underappreciated architects of the 20th century, Carlo Scarpa (June 2, 1906 – November 28, 1978) is best known for his instinctive approach to materials, combining time-honored crafts with modern manufacturing processes. In a 1996 documentary directed by Murray Grigor, Egle Trincanato, the President of the Fondazione Querini Stampalia for whom Scarpa renovated a Venetian palace in 1963, described how "above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one."

Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © Flickr CC user batintherain Garden at the Querini Stampalia. Image © Flickr CC user Jean-Pierre Dalbéra Olivetti Showroom. Image © Flickr CC user Jean-Pierre Dalbéra Central Pavilion in the Giardini at the Venice Biennale. Image © Flickr CC user Jean-Pierre Dalbéra

Carlo Scarpa. Venini 1932–1947 at Rooms for Glass / Selldorf Architects

Corroded, 1973 by Carlo Scarpa | via Selldorf Architects
Corroded, 1973 by Carlo Scarpa | via Selldorf Architects

The new exhibition space Rooms for Glass (Le Stanze del Vetro) in Italy, designed by Selldorf Architects, will open this summer in August 2012.  The first exhibit to inaugurate the space will be Carlo Scarpa. Venini 1932–1947, a collection of over 300 glassworks by architect Carlo Scarpa. The exhibit will run until November 29, 2012, after which Rooms for Glass will continue showcasing the art of Venetian glassmaking in the 20th century with other exhibits.

Read on for more after the break.

Aerial View of Rooms for Glass in Venice, Italy via Selldorf Architects Rooms for Glass Interior, Courtesy of Selldorf Architects Roman Murrine, 1936 by Carlo Scarpa | via Selldorf Architects Carlo Scarpa, circa 1970 via Selldorf Architects