ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Carlo Scarpa

10 Hard-To-Reach Masterpieces And How To Get There

08:00 - 23 July, 2017
10 Hard-To-Reach Masterpieces And How To Get There

Visiting architectural masterpieces by the greats can often feel like a pilgrimage of sorts, especially when they are far away and hard to find. Not everyone takes the time to visit these buildings when traveling, which makes getting there all the more special. With weird opening hours, hard-to-reach locations and elusive tours we thought we’d show a selection from our archives of masterpieces (modernist to contemporary) and what it takes to make it through their doors. Don’t forget your camera! 

9 Incredibly Famous Architects Who Didn't Possess an Architecture Degree

09:30 - 19 June, 2017

Had the worst jury ever? Failed your exams? Worry not! Before you fall on your bed and cry yourself to sleep—after posting a cute, frantic-looking selfie on Instagram, of course (hashtag so dead)—take a look at this list of nine celebrated architects, all of whom share a common trait. You might think that a shiny architecture degree is a requirement to be a successful architect; why else would you put yourself through so many years of architecture school? Well, while the title of "architect" may be protected in many countries, that doesn't mean you can't design amazing architecture—as demonstrated by these nine architects, who threw convention to the wind and took the road less traveled to architectural fame.

Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa

06:00 - 2 June, 2017
Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa, Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreaosti/4505639981/'>Flickr user andreaosti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Museo Castelvecchio. Image © Flickr user andreaosti licensed under CC BY 2.0

One of the most enigmatic and underappreciated architects of the 20th century, Carlo Scarpa (June 2, 1906 – November 28, 1978) is best known for his instinctive approach to materials, combining time-honored crafts with modern manufacturing processes. In a 1996 documentary directed by Murray Grigor, Egle Trincanato, the President of the Fondazione Querini Stampalia for whom Scarpa renovated a Venetian palace in 1963, described how "above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one."

Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/batintherain/8192243875'>Flickr user batintherain</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Garden at the Querini Stampalia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8142985275'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Olivetti Showroom. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8068024216'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Central Pavilion in the Giardini at the Venice Biennale. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/10160349164/'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 10

This Concrete Furniture Hardware is Inspired by Carlo Scarpa's Architecture

06:00 - 22 March, 2017
This Concrete Furniture Hardware is Inspired by Carlo Scarpa's Architecture , © Sameer Tawde
© Sameer Tawde

Material Immaterial Studio has unveiled MIRAGE, a series of concrete furniture hardware inspired by the works of architect Carlo Scarpa.

The MIRAGE series is made up of concrete handles, knobs, and robe hooks, all of which aim to create character through light and shadow. Some of the pieces, with a zigzag pattern, are meant to reduce the heaviness of the concrete material, making it seem light and delicate, while other pieces are meant to express a sense of solidity.

© Sameer Tawde © Sameer Tawde © Sameer Tawde © Sameer Tawde + 13

Riccardo De Cal: Into the Labyrinth — architetture veneziane

12:45 - 15 June, 2016
Riccardo De Cal: Into the Labyrinth — architetture veneziane, Riccardo De Cal © 2016
Riccardo De Cal © 2016

Riccardo De Cal presents his exhibition Into the Labyrinth at Fondazione Querini Stampalia in Venice, Italy. The exhibition will include 20 photographs, primarily selected from De Cal's new publication Dream of Venice Architecture. Inspired by novelist Jorge Luis Borges's statement that the maze, "is a building built to confuse people," De Cal has created an interior environment of metal armatures, audio recordings and photography. Designed by Melissa Siben, the exhibit is a modern three-dimensional representation of the labyrinthine structure of the city of Venice.

"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships

09:30 - 9 July, 2015
"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships, Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA
Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA

The world of architecture is small. So small in fact, that Rem Koolhaas has been credited with the creation of over forty practices worldwide, led by the likes of Zaha Hadid and Bjarke Ingels. Dubbed “Baby Rems” by Metropolis Magazine, this Koolhaas effect is hardly an isolated pattern, with manifestations far beyond the walls of OMA. The phenomenon has dominated the world of architecture, assisted by the prevalence and increasing necessity of internships for burgeoning architects.

In a recent article for Curbed, Patrick Sisson dug into the storied history of internships to uncover some unexpected connections between the world's most prolific architects. With the help of Sisson's list, we've compiled a record of the humble beginnings of the household names of architecture. Where did Frank Gehry get his start? Find out after the break.

Renzo Piano's pavilion at Louis Kahn's Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Robert Laprelle Jeanne Gang worked on OMA's Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Mies van der Rohe worked on Behren's AEG Turbine Factory. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>. Image © Flickr CC user Joseph The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York by Louis Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Jack E. Boucher + 8

Carlo Scarpa. Venini 1932–1947 at Rooms for Glass / Selldorf Architects

15:00 - 5 June, 2012
Corroded, 1973 by Carlo Scarpa | via Selldorf Architects
Corroded, 1973 by Carlo Scarpa | via Selldorf Architects

The new exhibition space Rooms for Glass (Le Stanze del Vetro) in Italy, designed by Selldorf Architects, will open this summer in August 2012.  The first exhibit to inaugurate the space will be Carlo Scarpa. Venini 1932–1947, a collection of over 300 glassworks by architect Carlo Scarpa. The exhibit will run until November 29, 2012, after which Rooms for Glass will continue showcasing the art of Venetian glassmaking in the 20th century with other exhibits.

Read on for more after the break.

Aerial View of Rooms for Glass in Venice, Italy via Selldorf Architects Rooms for Glass Interior, Courtesy of Selldorf Architects Roman Murrine, 1936 by Carlo Scarpa | via Selldorf Architects Carlo Scarpa, circa 1970 via Selldorf Architects + 11