Beret / y+M

© Yohei Sasakura / Sasa no kurasya

Architects: y+M
Location: Kagawa Prefecture,
Photographs: Yohei Sasakura / Sasa no kurasya

Elenberg Fraser Reveals Designs for Melbourne’s Tallest Residential Tower

Courtesy of Golden Age Group

Elenberg Fraser Architects have revealed designs for what is slated to be Melbourne’s tallest residential tower. The project seeks to reinvent the natural landscape of ’s Victoria state in an urban setting, through an optically transformative facade and botanical aesthetic.

This Whimsical Cage Redefines Public Space

Courtesy of Warren Techentin Architecture

Folly is a word not often used in architecture. By definition, ‘folly’ is a lack of good sense, or foolishness. And in the realm of architecture, folly is used to describe an extravagantly ornamented structure with no practical purpose. Yet gathering their inspiration from this word, Warren Techentin Architecture (WTARCH) have created and mounted a functional folly, appropriately named La Cage aux Folles (The Cage of Follies). Constructed of painted, steel tubes and installed at Materials & Applications, an exhibition centre in Los Angeles, La Cage aux Folles played host to an array of musical performances and lectures.

Explore La Cage aux Folles with more photos and info after the break.

Ban House / Zhang Dongguang + Liu Wenjuan

©

Architects: , Liu Wenjuan
Location: Weinan, Shaanxi, China
Area: 80.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Liu Wenjuan

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2014 Venice Biennale

The Conflict Between the Global North and South at the 2014 Venice Biennale

A view from the floor of the Latvian pavilion. The sheets of paper carry images of Modernist buildings; the ceiling asks, “There is no Modernism in Latvia”, commenting on the lack of historical scholarship. Image Courtesy of NRJA

“Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014 is an invitation to the national pavilions to show, each in their own way, the process of the erasure of national characteristics in architecture in favor of the almost universal adoption of a single modern language and a single repertoire of typologies.” In this article, originally published on  as “Whose Modernity?“, Avinash Rajagopal investigates the conflict this mandated theme at the 2014 Venice Biennale unintentionally created between the Northern and Southern pavilions - with Northern pavilions tending to declare sole ownership over Modernism and many Southern pavilions denying that their countries were passive recipients of the North’s globalization. For more on how the Southern pavilions challenged the typical conveyance of architectural history, continue reading after the break.

Happycheap House / Tommy Carlsson

© Michael Perlmutter

Architects: Tommy Carlsson
Location: , Sweden
Area: 110.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Michael Perlmutter

9 Endangered Monuments to Receive Funding for Conservation Works

The Güell Pavilions in Barcelona, Spain. Image Courtesy of Samuel Ludwig

From Gaudí-designed pavilions in Barcelona, Spain to the Tenyuji Temple in Ogatsu, Japan, nine “at-risk” historical monuments will receive funding for works, thanks to a $1.5 million grant from American Express to the World Monuments Fund (WMF). The nine sites were all included on WMF’s 2014 Watch list, and include Pokfulam Village in Hong Kong (SAR), China; the churches of Saint Merri and Notre-Dame-de-Lorette in Paris, France; the Farnese Aviaries in Rome, Italy; Tenyuji Temple, in Ogatsu, Japan; Fundidora Park in Monterrey, Mexico; the Güell Pavilions in Barcelona, Spain; the House of Wonders in Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania; Battersea Power Station in London, United Kingdom; and Sulgrave Manor in Sulgrave, United Kingdom.

This is the second portion of a $5 million, five-year grant from American Express to support WMF. “The longstanding support of American Express to the World Monuments Watch has resulted in preservation work at more than 150 sites in over 60 countries,” said WMF President Bonnie Burnham in a press release. “The sites on the 2014 Watch that will receive support are extraordinary places whose preservation will benefit both local populations and visitors from around the world.”

Read on after the break for a description of the sites.

Video: Sheppard Robson Underlines Importance of Hand Sketching

Our friends at Crane.tv have brought you the personal insights of Dan Burr and Lee Bennett of Sheppard Robson on the innumerable merits of hand sketching in the design process. The architects describe the process of designing within a team and communicating ideas to clients through simple and powerful visuals. Explaining their current projects, the two discuss the various roles of computer generated drawings versus hand drawings, and the instrumental value a single drawing could have in shaping a client-designer relationship, or the entire trajectory of a project.

Lee Bennet muses, “When you’re working with a computer, there’s a machine in the way. When you’re drawing, its an instant connection between your brain and the paper, and there’s something kind of instant about it, and magical.”

Grupo CP / SPACE

© Adrenorama

Architects: SPACE
Location: , Federal District, Mexico
Architect In Charge: Juan Carlos Baumgartner, Gabriel Téllez Galindo
Area: 4800.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Adrenorama, Paul Czitrom

Osteopathie praktijk Roosendaal / zone zuid architecten

Courtesy of Gido van Zon

Architects: zone zuid architecten
Location: Wouwbaan 216, 4703 TA Roosendaal, The Netherlands
Architect In Charge: Gido van Zon
Area: 225.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Gido van Zon

Dunrobin Shores / Christopher Simmonds Architect

© Doublespace Photography

Architects: Christopher Simmonds Architect
Location: Ottawa, ON, Canada
Year: 2014
Photographs: Doublespace Photography

Master Plan Revealed for Binhai Eco City in Tianjin

Courtesy of Holm Architecture Office

Holm Architecture Office and have been named shared winners of the Eco City Binhai Master Plan. Located outside Tianjin in Northern China, the project will consist of a new Central Business District and five new cultural buildings. Learn more about this plan after the break.

Offices Business Incubato / bureau faceB

© Vincent Fillon

Architects: bureau faceB
Location: Nanterre,
Associate Architects: Ateliers
Area: 17541.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Vincent Fillon, Jonathan Alexandre

Courtesy of MARK Magazine
Courtesy of MARK Magazine

MARK Magazine #51

Articles on China’s building boom often highlight the property bubble, megalomaniac planners, governmental corruption and private graft, substandard building practices and the destruction of the nation’s cultural heritage.
In Mark… #51, we interviewed four Chinese architects on four aspects of

The Critics Speak: 6 Reasons why Hadid Shouldn’t Have Sued the New York Review of Books

© ZHA

For those that follow the ins and outs of architectural criticism, it will have been hard to miss the news this week that Zaha Hadid is suing the New York Review of Books, claiming that the critical broadside launched by Martin Fuller against Hadid in his review of Rowan Moore’s book Why We Build was not only defamatory but also unrepresentative of the content of the book. Hadid’s lawyers demanded a retraction of the review, which they claimed had caused Hadid “severe emotional and physical distress.”

Hadid’s lawsuit did manage to elicit an apology from Filler, but probably not the one she was hoping for: Filler posted a retraction admitting that his review confused the number of deaths involved in all construction in Qatar in 2012-13 (almost 1,000) with the number of deaths on Hadid’s own Al Wakrah stadium (exactly zero). However, much of Filler’s comments criticizing Hadid’s cold attitude to conditions for immigrant workers in Qatar remain unaddressed.

Throughout the week, a number of other critics took this opportunity to pile more criticism on Hadid, unanimously agreeing that the lawsuit was a bad idea. Read on after the break to see the six reasons they gave explaining why.

Morvest Headquarters / Anthrop Architects

© Dewald van Helsdingen

Architects: Anthrop Architects
Location: Noordwyk, ,
Year: 2013
Photographs: Dewald van Helsdingen

UNESCO: Friend or Foe?

Right now Istanbul epitomizes the debate in question, with would-be developers taking on preservationists. Do new developments threaten Istanbul’s world-class heritage, or does heritage protection restrict important new development? Image © Flickr CC User Jules Gervais

Earlier this week, two articles on Domus engaged each other in a debate over the affect of UNESCO World Heritage status on the cities they supposedly protect. Is UNESCO turning the world’s cities into museums and hindering their future cultural development? Or could it be a positive force for protecting architecture and culture? Read on after the break to learn more about these clashing opinions.

Courtesy of ANCB
Courtesy of ANCB

“Seoul: Towards a Meta-City” Exhibition Opens in Berlin

On Thursday, the Aedes Network Campus Berlin (ANCB) Metropolitan Laboratory hosted a symposium to mark the opening of the exhibition ”Seoul: Towards a New City,” in collaboration with the City of Seoul. The city has identified three key objectives to help them strike a balance between restoration and change when moving forward with future development: revival of history, restoration of nature, and renewal of people’s lives. Seven projects that reflect these goals are on display at the exhibition. For more details, continue reading after the break.