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Roman: The Latest Architecture and News

Capitals Of Classical Antiquity: Understand The Difference Between The 5 Orders

Whether it's to start analyzing a detail or impressing someone in conversation, understanding a classical building begins with an awareness of the different classical orders of architecture. In the historical records of architecture, the first account of the orders was written by Vitruvius: "[...] The orders came to provide a range of architectural expressions, ranging from roughness and firmness to slenderness and delicacy. In true classical design, order choice is a vital issue—it is the choice of tone," [1] which for the author, synthesizes the "architecture grammar." [2]

According to John Summerson, author of The Classical Language of Architecture, "[...] a classic building is one whose decorative elements derive directly or indirectly from the architectural vocabulary of the ancient world—the 'classical' world [...]. These elements are easily recognizable, such as, for example, the five standard types of columns that are used in a standardized way, the standard treatments of openings and pediments, or, still, the standardized series of ornaments that are employed in classical buildings." [3]

Foster + Partners' Roman Antiquities Museum in Narbonne Nears Completion

Foster + Partner’s Musée de la Romanité Narbonne (Roman Museum of Narbonne) has moved closer to completion, with the scheme's building envelope now fully constructed. The museum seeks to become one of the most significant cultural attractions in the Southern French region, hosting more than 1000 Roman artifacts. The scheme’s progress was celebrated at a topping out ceremony on 30th January 2018, with the installation of VELUX Modular Skylights marking the completion of the building envelope.

Once a major Roman port, the city of Narbonne has amassed an abundance of ancient buildings, relics, and archaeological sites. The Foster + Partners scheme, designed in collaboration with museum specialist Studio Adrien Gardere, centers on the prime exhibit for the museum: a collection of over 1000 Roman funerary stones recovered from the city’s medieval walls in the 19th century. The stones are to be placed at the heart of a simple rectilinear structure, separating the public galleries from private research spaces.

Museum Narbonne. Image Courtesy of Nigel Young / Foster + PartnersMuseum Narbonne. Image Courtesy of Nigel Young / Foster + PartnersMuseum Narbonne. Image Courtesy of Nigel Young / Foster + PartnersMuseum Narbonne. Image Courtesy of Nigel Young / Foster + Partners+ 17

A Roof for Verona’s Roman Amphitheater – Competition Winners Announced

The results of a competition to propose an openable roof over the Arena di Verona, Italy have been announced. Three winners were chosen out of eighty-seven proposals to cover the famous amphitheater, a defining symbol of the city of Verona. The competition was announced in March 2016 in order to protect the Roman monument from the elements and to ensure that it continues to provide quality entertainment to spectators two thousand years after its construction.

Winning proposal by GMP. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press OfficeWinning proposal by GMP. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press OfficeSecond place proposal by Vincenzo Latina. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press OfficeThird place proposal by Roberto Ventura. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press Office+ 19